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Full text of "Announcements"

SSOCIATION OI 
CHICAGO 

Theological 
Schools 



Bethany Theological Seminary 
Catholic Theological Union 
Chicago Theological Seminary 

GaRRETT-Ev ANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville / Lombard Theological Seminary 
North Park Theological Seminary 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 
St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
19 8 5-1986 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Association of Chicago Theological Schools 1 

Basic Information 1 

The Member Seminaries 2 

Common Council 8 

Faculty Area Groups 8 

Additional Resources 12 

Chicago Theological Institute 12 

Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 12 

Cluster Student Federation 13 

Feminist Theological Coalition 13 

The Urban Academy in Chicago 14 

Spertus College of Judaica 14 

Center for Advanced Study of Religion and Science (CASIRAS) 15 

The Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial Society (ICUIS) 15 

El Centro de Estudios Teologicos 15 

Non-Credit Language Courses 16 

Library Resources 17 

Academic Calendars 19 

Information about Course Listings 22 

Organization of Course Descriptions 22 

Abbreviations 22 

Explanations of Course Numbers 22 

How Cross-Registration Works 24 

Course Descriptions 25 

Fall 25 

Biblical Studies 25 

Historical Studies 30 

Theological Studies 33 

Ethical Studies 37 

World Mission Studies 40 

Ministry Studies 40 

Winter 50 

Biblical Studies 50 

Historical Studies 55 

Theological Studies 58 

Ethical Studies 62 

World Mission Studies 64 

Mi nistry Studies 65 

Spring 74 

Biblical Studies 74 

Historical Studies 78 

Theological Studies 82 

Ethical Studies 86 

World Mission Studies 89 

Ministry Studies 90 

Special Areas of Interest Within Courses of Study 99 

Hispanic Studies 99 

Black Studies 99 

Judaic Studies 100 

Women's Studies 100 

ACTS Personnel 101 

Faculty and Executive Officers 101 

Librarians 116 

Locations of ACTS Schools 120 



ASSOCIATION 

OF 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 

BASIC INFORMATION 

The organization known as ACTS has emerged out of conversations during 1982-84 
among representatives, especially presidents, deans and librarians, of all of the 
theological schools located in or near Chicago. It is intended to be the chief avenue of 
cooperation among its member institutions, particularly in the areas of student cross- 
registration, library access and acquisitions, interchange among faculty members in the 
various disciplines of theological education, and communications between the schools. 

The formation of ACTS follows many years of successful ecumenical cooperation 
primarily within two other organizations, the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools 
(see pp. 12-13) and the Chicago Theological Institute (see p. 12). Other cooperative 
agreements between these schools are embodied in a wide variety of arrangements be- 
tween two or more institutions. 

All of the schools in ACTS are accredited members of the Association of Theological 
Schools in the United States and Canada. Each is affiliated with or sponsored by a 
denomination, a diocese, a religious organization or several religious orders. Each offers 
professional degree programs for ministry at the master's and doctoral levels, and most 
offer other academic degrees as well. All offer some variety of continuing education for 
clergy and lay leaders, and conferences, lectures and other programs of interest to a 
wider public. 

Together, the schools within ACTS offer an enormously rich network of resources for 
theological education, making it one of very few such centers of theological education in 
the world. Available to the approximately 3500 students currently enrolled at its 
member schools is a faculty of some 300, over 1000 courses offered annually, and library 
collections of over 1.2 million volumes and nearly 5000 currently received periodical 
subscriptions. Several schools have well-stocked theological bookstores. Most impor- 
tant, ACTS makes it possible for students and faculty to pursue their work, study and 
reflection in interaction with people from many different cultural and theological tradi- 
tions. 

Students in ACTS schools also have access to many other resources pertinent to 
theological education made available by institutions related to ACTS (see pp. 12-16). 
Many also draw on the vast resources of other institutions of higher education and the 
numerous religious organizations and agencies in the Chicago area related to one or 
more of the institutions in ACTS. 

ACTS itself does not offer either courses or degrees. Application for enrollment is 
made to one of the member institutions. 

An essential tool for cross-registration purposes, this catalog also includes information 
about utilizing the many resources for theological education available to students enroll- 
ed in member schools of ACTS. 

Inquiries regarding ACTS should be directed to President Neal Fisher, Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary, 2121 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60201; 
Phone (312) 866-3900. 



THE MEMBER SEMINARIES 



BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Bethany education is shaped by Church of the Brethren concerns in such areas as 
peace, discipleship, and servanthood. It seeks to provide a community of scholarship 
and love where insistence upon academic excellence is balanced by concern for personal 
growth. Curricular design includes peer accountability groupings oriented toward in- 
tegration of heritage and ministerial competencies. 




Butterfield and Meyers Roads 

Oak Brook, Illinois 60521 

(312)620-2200 



President 

Dean of Faculty 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Dean of Students 

Treasurer and Business Manager 

Director of Development 

Associate in Development 

Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

M.A.Th. 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Warren F. Groff 

Graydon F. Snyder 

Donald E. Miller 

John J. Cassel 

Duane L. Steiner 

E. Floyd McDowell 

Kenneth S. Frantz 

N. Geraldine Plunkett 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 
9 years 



CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 

A collaborative school serving twenty religious orders, founded to promote diverse 
theological and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Emphasis on 
preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic pattern augmented by strong field 
education programs. Other special features: fully individualized M.A. Program; World 
Mission Program designed to prepare American and foreign students to minister in 
other cultures. Programs open to all serious students, men and women. 



President 

Vice President and Dean 

Treasurer and Business Manager 

Director of Development 

Dean of Students 

Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Director of M.Div. Program 

Director of M.A. Program 

Director of M.T.S. Program and 

Continuing Education 
Degree Programs: 



John E. Linnan, C.S.V. 
Robert J. Schreiter, C.PP.S. 

Mary C. Bernstein, R. S.C.J. 

Thomas F. Wogan 

Steven Murphy 

Raymond F. Dieshourg, M.S.C. 

John Paul Szura, O.S.A. 

JohnT. Pawlikowski.O.S.M. 

Francis Tebbe, O.F.M. 



M.T.S. 

M.A. in Theology 

M.Div. 

M.Div. with Mission Specialization 

M.Div. with Word and Worship Specialization 



Time 


Beyond A.B. 


Normally Required 




2 years 




2 years 




3-4 years 




3-4 years 


l 


3-4 years 




5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-8000 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

An ecumenical Seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering 
rigorous theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and profes- 
sional integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. The basic professional degree 
program is the three year Master of Divinity, but the Master of Arts in Religious Studies 
may be awarded at the end of the second year as a terminal master's degree. The 
post-M.Div. Doctor of Ministry is available full or part-time for students with experience 
in ministry. Joint programs with pastoral care institutions are available. The Ph.D. pro- 
grams focus on Theology and the Human Sciences, Marriage and Family Therapy and 
Christian-Jewish Relations. 

President Kenneth B. Smith 

Academic Dean Yoshio Fukuyamn 

Registrar and Director of Professional Studies Cheryl W. Miller 

Director of Field Education William R. Myers 

Dean of Student Life W. Dow Edgerton 

Director of Recruitment, Admissions, Richard D. Lewis 

and Financial Aid 
Vice-President for Business Affairs 
Vice-President for Development 
Degree Programs: 




5757 South University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 752-5757 



M.A. in Re 

M.Div. 

M.Th. 

D.Min. 

Ph.D. 



IglOU! 



Studi 



Randall Vaughn 
Stephen J. Davidson 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 
4-5 years 

6 years 



GARRETT-EV ANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Garrett-Evangelical is a graduate divinity school of the United Methodist Church. 
While the majority of the faculty and the students is affiliated with the school's 
denominational heritage, the seminary is ecumenical in religious and educational ap- 
proaches. The curricula emphasize theory and practice; they include the institutional 
emphases on The Church and the Black Experience, Peace and Justice, and Women in 
Ministry. The basic programs lead to the Master of Divinity, Master of Christian Educa- 
tion or Master of Theological Studies degrees. The advanced professional program leads 
to the Doctor of Ministry degree, while the Joint Program with Northwestern University 
leads to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 



President 

Dean 

Associate Dean 

Director of the Ph.D. Program 

Vice President for Student Affairs 

Vice President for Development 

Vice President for Business Affairs 

Registrar 

Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 

M.C.E. 

M.T.S. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 

Ph.D. 



Neal F. Fisher 

Richard D. Tholin 

Douglas E. Wingeier 

Wolfgang Roth 

Adolf M. Hansen 

David L. Heetland 

Sadayuki Mouri 

Vera L. Watts 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

3 years 

2 years 

2 years 

9 years 

6 years 




212 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, Illinois 60201 

(312)866-3900 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 



Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, 
academic study of theology. Curriculum features strong accent upon study of the tradi- 
tions of the Church and a comprehensive field work program. Now including also 
resources of Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

President William E. Lesher 



*2K& 



a 




1100 East 55th Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312)667-3500 



Dean 


Franklin Sherman 


Vice President for Development 


Donovan J. Palmquist 


Vice President for Administration and Finance 


Joseph L. Rodrick 


Dean of Students 


Jean Bozeman 


Director of Pastoral Studies 


Phyllis Anderson 


Director of Graduate Studies 


Philip Hefner 


Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 


Robert L. Conrad 


Director of Continuing Education 


David E. Deppe 


Director of Admissions and Registrar 


Josephine A. Brandt 


Degree Programs: 


Time Beyond A.B. 




Normally Required 


M.A. 


2 years 


M.Div. 


4 years 


Th.M. 


5 years 


Th.D. 


7 years 


D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 


10 years 



McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



McCormick is a theological center for the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It also 

welcomes many students from outside this denomination. It focuses its resources on 

education for the ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional (M.A.T.S. <Sl M.Div.) 

and professional (D.Min.) studies. Its programs in Hispanic Studies, Women's Studies, 

and Urban Ministry, its dual competency programs in Social Work and other fields, and 

its emphasis on internationalization add to its other offerings. Students are encouraged 

to plan, with advice, their own courses of study. 

President 

Dean of the Seminary 

Asst. Dean & Registrar 

Director of the Doctor of Ministry Program 

Director of the Hispanic Ministries Program 

Dean of Student Life 

Director of Admissions 

Vice President for Seminary Relations 

Vice President for Business Affairs 

Degree Programs: 



Lewis S. Mudge 
Shirley S. Dudley 
Robert C. Worley 
Ruben Armendariz 
Pauline Coffman 
Marjorie Mason 
Raymond A. Bowden 
Anthony Ruger 
Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 



McCormick 




M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div.* 

M.Div./M.S.W. 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 
*May be taken with specialization in Hispan 
Hispanic Ministries (3 year program) may 
upon completion of baccalaureate degree. 



Mi 



2 years 

3 years 


Seminary 


4 years 

8 years 

listries. Diploma in 

nverted to M.Div. 


5S5S South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 
(312) 241-7800 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 



Meadville/Lombard is a small, independent school whose central mission and purpose 
is preparation for ministry, primarily for parish ministry within the societies of the 
Unitarian Universalist Association. Neither Unitarian Universalist membership nor in- 
tention to seek ordination for parish ministry is a requirement for enrollment. The 
academic program leading to the M.Div. or D.Min. degree is closely related to the 
Divinity School of the University of Chicago, with which Meadville/Lombard is af- 
filiated, and may include a University A.M. degree. 



Ul 



5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312)753-3195 



Dean and Chief Executive 

Business Manager 

Admissions Officer, Dean of Students 

Librarian 

Registrar and Director for Student and 

Academic Services 
Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 
D.Min. 



Gene Reeves 

Randall Vaughn 

Neil H. Shadle 

Neil W. Gerdes 

Cecelia E. Smith 

Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 

3 years 

4 years 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

North Park Theological Seminary, founded in 1891, is the graduate school of theology 
of the Evangelical Covenant Church. It is a professional school designed to educate peo- 
ple for ministry, whether as pastors, missionaries, church educators or trained laity. The 
seminary is a community of professors and students gathered not only for the purpose of 
theological study, but for worship, fellowship and the deepening of the spritual life. 
Further, the seminary includes in its purposes the continuing education of ministers. It 
sees itself as a servant of the Church of Jesus Christ, and particularly, of the Evangelical 
Covenant Church. 



President 




William R. Hausman 


Vice President and Dean 


of the Seminary 


Robert K. Johnston 


Vice President for Business Affairs 


Edgar E. Swanson 


Vice President for Institutional Advancement 


Alvin Austin, II 


Dean of Students 




John E. Phelan, Jr. 


Degree Programs: 




Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 


M.Div. 




4 years 


M.A.R.E. 




2 years 


M.A.T.S. 




2 years 



* 



NorthPark 
TheologicalSeminary 

5125 North Spaulding Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60625 

(312) 794-5250 



NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



The educational purpose of the Seminary is the graduate professional theological educa- 
tion of men and women for ministry. The study and application of the Scriptures is con- 
sidered foundational. The faculty promotes free discussion and inquiry in a community 
of scholars. Growth of the whole person is fostered in a caring community. The 
Seminary has an evangelical commitment, is related to the American Baptist Churches, 
U.S.A., welcomes students from all Christian traditions and encourages participation in 
ecumenical dialogue. 

President 

Dean of the Seminary 

Assistant to the President for Business Affairs 

Assistant to the President for Development 
><-"frx Associate Dean 

#^^+^L Registrar and Director o) Admissions 

\ ifr*— ^y Director of Field Services 

V rJ4or thern baptist £' r ector °{ Z octoral l tu f* 

Director of Hispanic Studies 
Assistant to the Dean for Recruitment 

and Community Life 
Degree Programs: 



or thern baptist 
theological seminary 



660 East Butterfield Road 

Lombard, Illinois 60148 

(312) 620-2101 (President's Office); 

(312) 620-2103 (Dean's Office); 
(312) 620-2105 (Registrar's Office) 



M.A. in Christian Education 

M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div. 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



William R. Myers 

David M. Scholer 

Edmund Powell 

David L. Nichols 

Eric H. Ohlmann 

Douglas R. Sharp 

William R. Nelson 

E. Alfred Jenkins 

Osvaldo L. Mottesi 

Susan Grisham 



Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 

2 years 

2 years 

3 years 
9 years 



ST. MARY OF THE LAKE SEMINARY 

With roots in a charter granted over 130 years ago, St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 
possesses the task of preparing candidates academically, formationally and spiritually for 
the Roman Catholic priesthood. As a canonically erected Pontifical Theological Facul- 
ty, St. Mary of the Lake is empowered to confer the Bachelor, Licentiate, and Doctoral 
degrees in Sacred Theology. While originally most of the students attending St. Mary of 
the Lake came from the Archdiocese of Chicago, its alumni now include students from 
other dioceses in the State of Illinois and throughout the country, as well as members of 
various religious communities. 



President-Rector 

Academic Dean 

Registrar 

Dean of Formation 

Procurator 

Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 

ST. 13. 
S.T.L. 
D.Min. 



Gerald F. Kicanas 

John G. Lodge 

Gelia Wilson 

John F. Canary 

Richard Schroedcr 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

4 years 

5 years 

5 years 

6 years 




Mundelein, Illinois (^00(^0 
(312) 566-640 1 



SEABURY- WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Seabury- Western Seminary, one of the eleven accredited seminaries of the Episcopal 
Church, is a largely residential seminary committed to providing excellence in academic 
preparation for congregational leadership. Worship, offered three times a day, is central 
to community life. The student body reflects the breadth of Anglican tradition, drawing 
students from 25 or more states each year. Located just across the street from Garrett- 
Evangelical Seminary, the two schools have joined forces to form the United Library 
which provides an outstanding theological library of 260,000 volumes. Students study- 
ing at Seabury- Western experience the distinctive eclecticism that characterizes 
Anglicanism. 




2122 Sheridan Road 

Evanston, Illinois 60201 

(312)328-9300 



President and Dean 

Registrar 

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

Degree Programs: 

M.Div. 

M.A. (Special Ministries) 

M.T.S. 



Mark S. Sisk 

Leonel L. Mitchell 

William P. Haugaard 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

3 years 

2 years 

2 years 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School is maintained by the Evangelical Free Church of 
America to educate men and women for a world-wide Christian ministry as pastors, 
missionaries, teachers, and lay-workers who are committed to God for a particular ser- 
vice for which they recognize a need for seminary studies. The Divinity School welcomes 
the opportunity of assisting students from all denominations and independent non- 
denominational churches who are seeking preparation for fruitful Christian life and 
ministry. 

Kenneth M. Meyer 

Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. 

Warren S. Benson 

Gary Erlandson 

Joseph C. Hassey 

V. Eugene Goldy 



President 

Academic Dean and Vice President of Education 

Vice President of Academic Administration 

Vice President of Business Affairs 

Vice President of Student Affairs 

Vice President of Institutional 

and Campus Development 
Director of Doctor of Ministry 

and Doctor of Missiology 
Degree Programs: 

M.A. (eight areas) 

M.Div. 

Th.M. 

M.A.R. 

M.R.E. 

Ed.D. (4 years experience prerequisite) 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 

D.Miss. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Timothy M. Warner 

Time Beyond A.B. 
Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 
2 years 
2 years 

7 years 

8 years 
8 years 




2065 Half Day Road 

Deerfield, Illinois 60015 

(312)945-8800 



COMMON COUNCIL 

of the 

ASSOCIATION OF CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



Warren F. GrofT 

John E. Linnan, C.S.V. 

Kenneth B. Smith 

Neal F. Fisher, Chairperson 

William E. Lesher, Vice-Chairperson 

Gene Reeves, Secretary 

William R. Hausman 

William R. Myers 

Gerald F. Kicanas 

Mark S. Sisk 

Kenneth M. Meyer 



Bethany Theological Seminary (BTS) 
Catholic Theological Union (CTU) 
Chicago Theological Seminary (CTS) 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary (G-ETS) 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (LSTC) 
McCormick Theological Seminary (MTS) 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School (M/L) 
North Park Theological Seminary (NPTS) 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary (NBTS) 
St. Mary of the Lake Seminary (SML) 
Seabury- Western Theological Seminary (S-WTS) 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS) 



FACULTY AREA GROUPS (See final pages for biographical data) 



OLD TESTAMENT 

Gleason Archer (TEDS) 

Barry Beitzel (TEDS) 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) 

Phyllis Bird (G-ETS) 

Reidar Bjornard (NBTS) 

Robert Boling (MTS) 

Edward Campbell (MTS) 

James Doyle (SML - Adj.) 

Wesley Fuerst (LSTC) 

Victoria Garvey, R.S.M. (S-WTS) 

Norma Goertzen (NPTS) 

Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) 

Leslie Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Walter Kaiser, Jr. (TEDS) 

Shin Kang (TEDS - Vis.) 

Ralph Klein (LSTC) 

Andre LaCocque (CTS) 

Donald Madvig (NPTS - Adj.) 

Dennis Magary (TEDS) 

Marjorie Matthews (G-ETS - Vis.) 

Thomas McComiskey (TEDS) 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 

Walter Michel (LSTC) 

David Nasgowitz (BTS/NBTS - Adj. 

Peter Nash (G-ETS) 

Robert Nefif (BTS - Vis.) 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) 

Eugene Roop (BTS) 



Wolfgang Roth (G-ETS) 

John Sailhamer (TEDS) 

Herman Schaalman (G-ETS - Adj.) 

Alphonse Spilly, C.PP.S. (SML - Adj.) 

Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) 

NEW TESTAMENT 

William Carroll (SML - Adj.) 

Donald Carson (TEDS) 

Charles Cosgrove (NBTS) 

Frederick Danker (LSTC) 

Richard Gardner (BTS - Vis.) 

Wayne Grudem (TEDS) 

Adolf Hansen (G-ETS) 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) 

Nancy Holsey (BTS/NBTS - Adj.) 

Estella Boggs Horning (BTS - Adj.) 

Carol Howard (NBTS) 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) 

Everard Johnston (CTU - Adj.) 

Robert Karris, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Edgar Krentz (LSTC) 

Eugene LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU - Adj. 

Walter Liefeld (TEDS) 

Wilhelm Linss (LSTC) 

John Lodge (SML) 

James Mcllhone (SML - Adj.) 

Scot McKnight (TEDS- Adj.) 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 



Douglas Moo (TEDS) 

Grant Osborne (TEDS) 

Carolyn Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Richard Pervo (S-WTS) 

John Phelan, Jr. (NPTS) 

David Scholer (NBTS) 

Robin Scroggs (CTS) 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) 

Graydon Snyder (BTS) 

Klyne Snodgrass (NPTS) 

Richard Stegner (G-ETS) 

William Thompson, S.J. (MTS - Adj.) 

Laurence Welborn (MTS) 

David Wieand (BTS - Emeritus) 

CHURCH HISTORY 

Glenn Anderson (NPTS) 

Philip Anderson (NPTS) 

Dorothy Bass (CTS) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

Walter Cason (G-ETS) 

Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky (CTU) 

Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M. (SML) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

Donald Durnbaugh (BTS) 

Robert Fischer (LSTC) 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) 

Dennis Groh (G-ETS) 

William Haugaard (S-WTS) 

Kurt Hendel (LSTC) 

Clair McPherson (S-WTS - Adj.) 

Charles Meyer (SML) 

Larry Murphy (G-ETS) 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) 

Eric Ohlmann (NBTS) 

Rodney Petersen (TEDS) 

V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS) 

Charles Rogers (G-ETS) 

Theodore Ross, S.J. (CTU - Adj.) 

Thomas Schafer (MTS) 

James Scherer (LSTC) 

James Stein (G-ETS) 

Murray Wagner (BTS) 

John Woodbridge (TEDS) 

Martin Zielinski (SML) 

THEOLOGY 

Phyllis Anderson (LSTC) 
Robert Bertram (LSTC) 
Steven Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) 



Carl Braaten (LSTC) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

Ralph Burhoe (M/L - Emeritus) 

John Burkhart (MTS) 

Winston Crum (S-WTS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

David Dunbar (TEDS) 

John Feinberg (TEDS) 

Paul Feinberg (TEDS) 

Thomas Finger (NBTS) 

Neal Fisher (G-ETS) 

Dena Pence Frantz (BTS - Adj.) 

Justo Gonzalez (MTS - Adj.) 

Warren Groff (BTS) 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Philip Hefner (LSTC) 

S. Lewis Johnson (TEDS) 

Robert Johnston (NPTS) 

Kenneth Kantzer (TEDS) 

Perry LeFevre (CTS) 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) 

Charles Meyer (SML) 

Lewis Mudge (MTS) 

Thomas Parker (MTS) 

Albert Pero, Jr. (LSTC) 

Jamie Phelps, O.P. (CTU) 

Gene Reeves (M/L) 

Rosemary Ruether (G-ETS) 

Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S. (CTU) 

John Shea (SML) 

Howard Snyder (NPTS - Adj.) 

W. Taylor Stevenson (S-WTS) 

Susan Thistlethwaite (CTS) 

Robert Tobias (LSTC) 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) 

James Will (G-ETS) 

Henry Young (G-ETS) 

Warren Young (NBTS - Emeritus) 

ETHICS 

Karen Bloomquist (LSTC) 

Patrick Boyle, S.J. (SML) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

Robert Chesnut (G-ETS - Adj.) 

William Craig (TEDS) 

Donald Dayton (NBTS) 

Raymond Diesbourg, M.S.C. (CTU) 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M.C.C.J. (CTU) 

Gerald Forshey (G-ETS - Adj.) 



Ismael Garcia (MTS) 

Stuart Hackett (TEDS) 

Rosemary Keller (G-ETS) 

Jerome Listecki (SML) 

Donald Miller (BTS) 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) 

John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) 

Timothy Sedgwick (S-WTS) 

Franklin Sherman (LSTC) 

Richard Tholin (G-ETS) 

Emilie Townes (G-ETS - Adj./MTS - Adj. 

Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) 

Henry Young (G-ETS) 

WORLD MISSION 

Raymond Bakke (NBTS) 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) 

Dale Brown (BTS) 

Walter Cason (G-ETS) 

Robert Coleman (TEDS) 

William Danker (LSTC - Emeritus) 

Wayne Detzler (TEDS) 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. (CTU) 

Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) 

David Hesselgrave (TEDS) 

Arthur Johnston (TEDS) 

J. Herbert Kane (TEDS - Vis.) 

Augustine Kanjamala, S.V.D. (CTU - Vis 

David Lindberg (LSTC) 

Simon Maimela (LSTC - Vis.; MTS - Adj. 

John Nyquist (TEDS) 

Jerold Reed (NPTS - Vis.) 

Nancy Reed (NPTS - Vis.) 

Thomas Reynolds, S.S.C. (CTU - Vis.) 

James Scherer (LSTC) 

Ruth Tucker (TEDS - Vis.) 

Robert Tuttle, Jr. (G-ETS) 

David Vikner (LSTC - Adj.) 

Timothy Warner (TEDS) 

Wayne Weld (NPTS) 

MINISTRY: ITS NATURE 
AND PRACTICE 

Carol Allen (MTS) 
Delmar Anderson (NPTS - Adj.) 
Ruben Armendariz (MTS) 
Raymond Bakke (NBTS) 



Raymond Bowden (MTS - Adj.) 
Richard Carlson (NPTS) 
Robert Carlson (S-WTS) 
Pauline Coffman (MTS - Adj.) 
Robert Craig (MTS) 
Carl Dudley (MTS) 
W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) 
Hugh Halverstadt (MTS) 
Norbert Johnson (NPTS - Adj.) 
Darryl Larson (NPTS - Adj.) 
Robert Larson (NPTS - Adj.) 
George Magnuson (MTS) 
Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 
Robert Navarro (LSTC) 
James Persson (NPTS - Adj.) 
Richard Wojcik (SML) 
Robert Worley (MTS) 
Walter Wright (NPTS - Adj.) 



PASTORAL CARE 

Philip Anderson (CTS) 

James Ashbrook (G-ETS) 

Homer Ashby, Jr. (MTS) 

Paul Bauermeister (LSTC) 

David Carlson (TEDS - Vis.) 

Gary Collins (TEDS) 

David Dillon (TEDS) 

Karin Granberg-Michaelson (NPTS - Adj. 

Emily Haight (G-ETS) 

Edwin Hallsten, Jr. (NPTS) 

John Hinkle (G-ETS) 

Everett Jackson (NPTS - Adj.) 

Emma Justes (G-ETS) 

Marie McCarthy, S.P.. (CTU) 

David McKay (TEDS - Vis.) 

Robert Moore (CTS) 

James Poling (BTS) 

John Powell (TEDS - Vis.) 

Thomas Rzepiela (SML) 

William Secor, Jr. (TEDS) 

Paul Swanson (LSTC) 

George Taylor (NBTS) 

Edward Upton (SMLS) 

Edward Wimberly (G-ETS) 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

Richard Carlson (NPTS) 
John Cassel (BTS) 
Calvin Hanson (TEDS) 



10 



David Lindberg (LSTC) 
Carl Linde (TEDS) 
Milo Lundell (TEDS) 
William R. Nelson (NBTS) 
Neil Shadle (M/L) 
John Szura, O.S.A. (CTU) 
Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 

WORSHIP AND PREACHING 

Mark Bangert (LSTC) 

Richard Bodey (TEDS) 

Ernest Campbell (G-ETS) 

Donald Chatfield (G-ETS) 

David Deppe (LSTC) 

Vicky Schreiber Dill (BTS - Adj.) 

O. C. Edwards (S-WTS) 

Paul Engle (TEDS - Vis.) 

Nancy Faus (BTS) 

Edward Foley, O.F.M. Cap. (CTU - Adj. 

Frederic Hang, C.S.S.R. (CTU - Adj.) 

Herbert Hedstrom (NPTS - Adj.) 

J. Robert Hjelm (NPTS) 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 

Willard Jabusch (SML) 

Ralph Keifer (CTU) 

David Larsen (TEDS) 

Paul Manz (LSTC) 

Leonel Mitchell (S-WTS) 

William Myers (NBTS) 

Arthur Nelson (NPTS - Adj.) 

Leon Nelson (TEDS - Adj.) 

Morris Niedenthal (LSTC) 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) 

Arturo Perez (CTU - Adj.) 

Lloyd Perry (TEDS) 



Donna Peterson (TEDS - Vis.) 
Jay Rochelle (LSTC) 
Philip Stenberg (NPTS - Adj.) 
Don Wardlaw (MTS) 
C. John Weborg (NPTS) 
James Westgate (TEDS) 
John Wiens (NPTS - Adj.) 
Gail Wilson (MTS) 

RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

Frances Anderson (NPTS) 

Deirdre Banks (NPTS - Adj.) 

Warren Benson (TEDS) 

Jean Bozeman (LSTC) 

Elizabeth Caldwell (MTS) 

Robert Conrad (LSTC) 

Perry Downs (TEDS; NPTS - Adj. 

Dorothy Jean Furnish (G-ETS) 

E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) 

Bruce Lawson (NPTS - Adj.) 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) 

Donald Miller (BTS) 

Wilda Morris (NBTS) 

William Myers (CTS) 

Daniel Schipani (MTS - Adj.) 

Charles Sell (TEDS) 

Mark Senter (TEDS) 

Henry Simmons (G-ETS) 

Ted Ward (TEDS - Vis.) 

Douglas Wingeier (G-ETS) 

CANON LAW 

John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) 
Edward Stokes, S.J. (SML) 



11 



ADDITIONAL RESOURCES 

CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE (CTI) 

The Chicago Theological Institute (CTI) was organized by five theological schools in 
1974 for educational and ecumenical purposes: Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary, North Park Theological Seminary, Seabury- Western Theological Seminary, 
St. Mary of the Lake Seminary and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. 

The schools are located on the north side of the greater Chicago area, with one in 
Chicago, two on continguous campuses in Evanston adjacent to Northwestern Univer- 
sity, one in Deerfield and one in Mundelein. 

The activities of the CTI are under the direction of a Board of Directors whose officers 
are elected annually. From its beginning the CTI has emphasized the importance of stu- 
dent representation on its boards and committees. 

The CTI sponsors three events annually. In the fall an academic, ecumenical program 
is held for students and faculty members of its five schools. This fall event is planned to 
commemorate a significant moment in the history of Christian theological or spiritual 
development, for example, the birth of Martin Luther (1983) and the 200th anniversary 
of American Methodism (1984). 

In January each member school of CTI observes the Week of Prayer for Christian Uni- 
ty through activities appropriate to its own tradition. Exchange of pulpit speakers is one 
practice that has proven to be an enrichment of the schools at this time. 

The Spring Seminar offered annually is a three-hour course which has addressed 
various theological themes in a variety of forms. In recent years the seminar has focused 
on the diversity in which Christians of many traditions understand "Life in the Spirit." 
In its present format the seminar includes two overnight, intensive retreat experiences 
on the campus of St. Mary of the Lake Seminary. Registration for the seminar is limited 
in number. A minimal fee is requested of student participants. Further information 
regarding the "Life in the Spirit" Seminar can be obtained from Professor John Weborg, 
Coordinator (NPTS); Phone: (312) 583-2700 or from Sister Agnes Cunningham, 
S.S.C.M., CTI Executive Secretary (SML); Phone: (312) 566-6401. 

CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS (CCTS) 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools (CCTS) is an ecumenical association of 
seven seminaries: Bethany Theological Seminary, Catholic Theological Union, Chicago 
Theological Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, McCormick 
Theological Seminary, Meadville/Lombard Theological School and Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. The Cluster was organized in 1970 and incorporated as a not-for- 
profit corporation in 1971. 

Two of the seven member schools are located on contiguous campuses in west subur- 
ban Oak Brook and Lombard. Five schools are grouped closely together on the south 
side of Chicago adjacent to the University of Chicago, with which they maintain rela- 
tionships on various levels: bi-registration, a coordinated M.Div./Ph.D. program, facul- 
ty interaction, library and physical education facilities. 

Students of the member seminaries have benefited from the combined resources of 
these schools by active cross-registration and from the results of cooperative curriculum 
planning, especially in special areas such as Hispanic Studies, Black Studies, Judaic 
Studies and Women's Studies. 

Faculty members have interacted regularly in meetings according to their theological 
disciplines for the reading and discussion o( papers presented by Cluster faculty or 

12 



visiting scholars. 

A Cluster Committee on International Programs has united several schools in plan- 
ning Cluster-wide international events. The principal such event is the annual World 
Mission Institute (WMI), tentatively scheduled to be held April 10-12, 1986. The 1985 
Mission Institute featured outstanding international speakers and resource persons and 
dealt with the subject "North - South: Toward Bridging the Gap." Inquiries for the 1986 
WMI should be directed to James Scherer (LSTC); Phone: (312) 753-0754. 

With the advent of ACTS, discussions are underway regarding reorganization of func- 
tional and geographical sub-clustering that may restructure or expand these and other 
programs out of the rich history of Cluster cooperation. 



CLUSTER STUDENT FEDERATION (CSF) 

The Cluster Student Federation (CSF) was born in the winter of 1982 at a Cluster Stu- 
dent Assembly Day. It grew out of a recognition that an association of theological 
schools does not by itself create an ecumenical learning community. Students from 
member schools must find ways to communicate with each other and learn from the 
diverse religious heritages represented in order to share in the impact of ecumenism. 

In addition to the annual Assembly Day, the CSF has sponsored ecumenical worship 
services, a fall festival, some First Friday Breakfasts, fall and spring blood drives, and 
social events for Cluster students. Joint action on issues of peace and social justice has 
been made possible through the Social Action Coordinating Committee. A monthly 
newsletter, highlighting ecumenical events and ideas, has also facilitated communica- 
tion among students, making it possible for them to take part in the activities of Cluster 
schools. 

Supported entirely by student fees, the CSF seek to represent the needs of Cluster 
students as a unified body and also the needs of individual student constituencies, such 
as minorities and women. Two CSF representatives are elected from each school, and, 
ideally, one CSF representative each is elected by women, Hispanic, Black and Interna- 
tional students, respectively, to serve on the Representative Council which meets 
monthly'. In light of the incorporation of ACTS, the CSF is discussing implications for 
student cooperation in the future. 



FEMINIST THEOLOGICAL COALITION (FTC) 

In the fall of 1980 a group of women in theology and in ministry in the wider Chicago 
area began serious discussion of a program of feminist theology and ministerial prepara- 
tion. The Cluster Women's Caucus, consisting of one faculty or administrative person 
appointed by the president of each school, established the Feminist Theological Coali- 
tion (FTC) for the purpose of encouraging the ecumenical and academic concerns of 
female seminarians and to propose supplemental courses in women's studies. Students 
and faculty plan Women's Study Days, held quarterly, and faculty women meet regular- 
ly to share and critique ongoing writing and research. For further information, contact 
Carol Allen (MTS), Coordinator; Phone: (312) 241-7800. 

In conjunction with the Urban Academy of Chicago, the FTC offers a summer in- 
ternship program for women seminarians in city ministry under the supervision of 
female pastors. For details contact Gretchen Leppke; Phone: (312) 475-4251. 

13 



THE URBAN ACADEMY IN CHICAGO (UA) 

941 Lawrence Avenue Director: Donna Schaper 

Chicago, Illinois 60640 

(312) 271-7982 

The Urban Academy in Chicago is an interfaith, interracial urban training center 
that works cooperatively with theological schools and churches in the Chicago 
metropolitan area to promote the public ministry of religious institutions. Academy pro- 
grams provide an analysis of urban issues and practical experience in action for struc- 
tural change. 

Courses sponsored by the Urban Academy include: a 10-week Summer Quarter Ur- 
ban Internship program for seminarians with placements in urban churches, agencies 
and community organizations; a 6-week Summer Internship program for women 
seminarians with placements in churches served by women pastors; a series of Saturday 
Chicago Overview Seminars which examine different sectors of the city, including City 
Hall and ward politics, the Black, Hispanic and Asian communities, and the special pro- 
blems faced by women in the city; seminary courses on community organizing, com- 
munity development, urban stewardship and the politics of compassion; workshops on 
ministries addressing hunger, homelessness, joblessness, peace, sanctuary and the 
nuclear freeze. Urban Academy methods include an "urban plunge" where students 
sleep in shelters, eat in soup kitchens and attend neighborhood caucuses. 

Academy programs are open to all seminary students and most of the ACTS schools 
accept its courses for credit. Courses offered by the Urban Academy during the 1985-86 
academic year are listed in the course descriptions in this catalog under the appropriate 
headings with a UA prefix. Because procedures and modes of payment for participation 
in Urban Academy programs differ in individual schools, students are responsible to 
determine what particulars apply at their own schools. 

SPERTUS COLLEGE OF JUDAICA (SCJ) 

618 South Michigan Avenue Chancellor: David Weinstein 

Chicago, Illinois 60605 Vice-President for Academic Affairs: Byron Sherwin 

(312)922-9012 

Established in 1925, Spertus College of Judaica, a liberal arts institution, located in the 
Chicago Loop, offering undergraduate and graduate degree programs in Jewish and 
Hebrew studies, is the largest non-theological, secular institution of higher Jewish learn- 
ing in the Midwest. In addition to offering degree programs in Jewish studies, Spertus 
College of Judaica seeks to provide adult continuing education in Jewish studies for the 
Chicago community at large and to be a vibrant cultural resource center for Judaic lear- 
ning and activities in Chicago and the Midwest. 

An agreement between Spertus College of Judaica and the Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools was signed in 1978 to provide for cross-registration of students and 
library access. By special arrangement four Spertus courses will be taught on the cam- 
puses of Hyde Park member schools o( ACTS during the academic year 1985-86. These 
are listed in the courses descriptions in this catalog under the appropriate headings with 
an SCJ prefix. These courses are open for cross-registration for students o( all ACTS 
schools, but special considerations apply. Because procedures for cross-registration, ac- 
ceptance of courses for credit and modes of payment may differ in individual schools, 
students are responsible to determine what particulars apply at their own schools. 

14 



For further information about all the courses and programs of Spertus College of 
Judaica, contact the Department of Admissions and Student Services. 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE 
(CASIRAS) 

This is an independent incorporated institution located in Hyde Park which has 
developed an effective working relationship with neighboring theological schools. The 
Director is Ralph Wendell Burhoe, recent recipient of the Templeton Award. 

The purpose of such a cooperative relationship is to achieve a greater integration be- 
tween the scientific and religious models or images concerning the nature and destiny of 
humans. Dimensions of CASIRAS' work include seminars, courses, conferences, sym- 
posia and guided research as well as co-sponsorship of Zygon: journal of Religion and 
Science. 

For further information contact Professor Philip Hefner (LSTC); Phone: (312) 
753-0725. 

THE INSTITUTE ON THE CHURCH IN URBAN-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY 
(ICUIS) 

5700 South Woodlawn Avenue Director: Dick Simpson 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312)643-7111 

ICUIS is an ecumenical agency which identifies and monitors urban mission projects 
throughout the United States and in other countries. It facilitates contact and com- 
munication among local congregations engaged in urban ministries so they can learn 
from each other, collaborate in their work, and help initiate similar ministries in other 
churches. 

ICUIS was founded in 1944 as the Presbyterian Institute on Industrial Relations and 
was affiliated with McCormick Theological Seminary. It has since become in- 
terdenominational and cooperates with all Chicago area seminaries. The ICUIS files 
cover 40 years of urban mission history in the USA and abroad, and are available to the 
ACTS community. 

ICUIS currently is focusing on ministries addressing hunger, homelessness, peace, the 
sanctuary movement, nuclear free zones and US-Central America policies. With the Ur- 
ban Academy in Chicago it has developed training workshops on these issues for use by 
local, regional and national church groups. 

Internships and field placements are available for seminary students at the ICUIS office. 

EL CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS TEOLOGICOS 

2914 West North Avenue Director: Peter Earle 

Chicago, Illinois 60647 

(312)489-4533 

In 1981, El Centro de Estudios Teologicos was organized with the cooperation of The 
United Church of Christ Board of Homeland Ministries, The United Church of Christ 
Illinois Conference, San Lucas United Church of Christ, Chicago Theological 
Seminary, McCormick Theological Seminary and West Town Coalition of Chicago. 
The purpose of El Centro is to develop resources which will enable supporting 
denominations, agencies, congregations and institutions to prepare leadership for 

15 



Hispanic congregations and communities in the present and for the future. 

El Centro is located in an Hispanic community of Chicago. Through its programmatic 
efforts it provides space and coordination for Hispanic seminary level courses offered by 
Chicago Theological Seminary, Catholic Theological Union, Lutheran School of 
Theology, McCormick Theological Seminary and Northern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. In this setting, opportunity is provided for lay persons and community 
leaders for participation with seminarians in course work. El Centro also provides lay 
leadership consultations and workshops in response to the expressed needs of Hispanic 
churches and community. 

El Centro serves as the program unit for The Urban Academy of Chicago through 
organizing experiences and overviews which focus on the Hispanic community. 

NON-CREDIT LANGUAGE COURSES 

Non-credit courses in Spanish, French, German and Latin, as warranted by student 
interest, are available to graduate students in the Chicago area through a program 
established by the Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools. The aim of the courses is to 
assist students to achieve facility in reading the respective languages. Such facility is re- 
quired for certain degree programs, especially those beyond the M.Div. level. Moderate 
fees are charged. For further information, contact the Graduate Studies office at the 
Lutheran School of Theology; Phone: (312) 753-0764. 



16 



LIBRARY RESOURCES 

The combined library resources of the ACTS schools, comprising over 1.2 million 
volumes of books and about 5,000 currently received periodical subscriptions, represent 
one of the largest collections among the theological consortia of the nation. Nine 
libraries serve the twelve ACTS schools. Students and faculty of the member schools 
have borrowing, privileges at all of the libraries, but must abide by the circulation 
policies of each library. The Library Council and the Task Force on Acquisitions further 
the cooperative endeavors of the libraries of ACTS. 

THE LIBRARY COUNCIL 

The Library Council was formed in July, 1983 by the following libraries: Catholic 
Theological Union Library, Chicago Theological Seminary Library, Jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library (LSTC and MTS), Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
Library, North Park Theological Seminary Library, The Seminary Library (BTS and 
NBTS), Trinity Evangelical Divinity School Library and The United Library (G-ETS 
and S-WTS). 

The Library Council operates a courier service among its members to facilitate the 
loan of books and periodicals. Users may request materials from other member libraries 
which will be sent through the courier. The courier's schedule is three times a week dur- 
ing the Fall, Winter and Spring quarters and once a week during quarter breaks and the 
summer. 

The Library Council has published a brochure available at all of its member libraries 
describing the individual strengths and special collections of its members and detailing 
the services of each library. 

TASK FORCE ON ACQUISITIONS 

All of the libraries of the ACTS schools are members of this task force which meets 
regularly to discuss cooperative collection development and is presently working on an 
on-line union list of serials. The Billy Graham Center Library and The University of 
Chicago Library are also members of this task force. 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES 

In addition to the resources in the libraries of the ACTS schools, the resources of the 
Chicago Area Theological Library Association (CATLA) are available to the faculty 
and students of member schools. The United Library of Garrett-Evangelical and 
Seabury Western is part of NOTIS 3 (Northwestern Total Library Information System). 
Other member libraries afford access to the Illinois Library and Information Network 
(ILLINET) and to the holdings of OCLC (Online Computer Library Center). 

The Ecumenical Parish Resource Center (EPRC), administered by the Jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library and located at LSTC, provides a variety of current resources for use 
in church programs. The Center's resources include more than 50 religious education 
curricula; a special collection of materials pertaining to the various functions of the con- 
gregation, including worship, stewardship, church organizations, education and simula- 
tion games. 



17 



LIBRARIES OF THE MEMBER SEMINARIES OF ACTS 

In the following listing the library location is given only in the instance of a joint 
library. Hours are given for regular academic sessions. 



Bethany Theological Seminary 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

The Seminary Library 
BTS Campus 



Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary 
Society of Jesus: Chicago Province 

Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 



620-2214 






LSTC Campus 


Monday-Thursday 


8:00 a.m. 


10:00p.m. 


753-0739 


Friday 


8:00a.m. 


5:00 p.m. 


Monday-Thursday 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m 


Saturday 


9:00 a.m. 


5:00p.m. 


Friday-Saturday 8:30 a.m.- 4: 30 p.m 


Sunday 


2:30 p.m. 


5:00p.m. 


Sunday 7:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m 




7:00 p.m. 


10:00 p.m. 


Meadville/Lombard Theological School 


Catholic Theological Union 




The Library 


The Library 






753-3196 


324-8000, x22 






Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m 


Monday-Thursday 


8:30 a.m. 


10:00 p.m. 




Friday 


8:30 a.m. 


5:00 p.m. 


North Park Theological Seminary 


Saturday 


12:00 noon 


5:00p.m. 


Mellander Library 


Sunday 


5:00 p.m. 


10:00 p.m. 


^£1-7700 v 4?^ 



Chicago Theological Seminary 

Hammond Library 

752-5757, x25 

Monday-Thursday 8:45 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:45a.m.- 4:30p.m. 



Saturday 
Sunday 



1:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

7:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m. 



Monday-Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 

Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Saturday 10:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

Sunday 1:00 p.m. - 12:00 p.m. 

St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 

The Library 
566-6401 



Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 
Seabury-Westem Theological Seminary 

The United Library 
Both Campuses 



866-3909, 866-3899 






Monday-Thursday 


8:00 a.m. 


11:00 p.m. 


Friday 


8:00 a.m. 


5:00 p.m. 


Saturday 


12:00 noon 


5:00 p.m. 


Sunday 


3:00 p.m. 


10:00 p.m. 



Monday-Friday 



8:00 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. 



Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

Rolfing Memorial Library 

945-8800, x3 17 

Evenings and Saturdays, 945-8808 

Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 1 1:00 p.m. 

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 



18 



ACADEMIC CALENDARS 



All ACTS schools have three quarters of instruction each academic year, although 
they do not all use a common calendar. Essential dates are given below. 



bethany theological seminary 
catholic theological union 
chicago theological seminary 
lutheran school of theology at chicago 
meadville/lombard theological school 
Mccormick theological seminary 
northern baptist theological seminary 

1985-86 



September 25 
September 30 
November 19-21 
November 28-Dec. 1 
December 14 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 



1986-87 

September 24 

September 29 

November 18-20 

November 27-30 

December 13 



January 6 
February 25-27 
March 22 



WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 



January 5 

February 24-26 

March 21 



March 31 

(During Spring Recess) 

May 20-22 

June 7 

(M/L and UC, June 14) 



SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 



March 30 

April 17 

May 19-21 

June 6 

(M/L and UC, June 13) 



GARRETT-EV ANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1985-1986 

September 26-27 
September 30 
November 25-29 
December 2-4 
December 13 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 
Classes Begin 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Registration for Winter Quarter 
Fall Quarter Ends 



(1986-87) 
(tentative) 

September 25-26 
September 29 

November 24-28 
December 1-3 
December 12 



January 2 
February 24-26 
March 7 



WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 



January 5 

February 23-25 

March 6 



March 17 
March 27-28 
May 23 



SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Spring Quarter Ends 



March 16 
April 16-17 

May 22 



19 



NORTH PARK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1985-86 



September 9-13 
September 16 
October 14-18 
November 22 



January 6 
February 3-7 
March 14 



FALL 

Registration for Year* 
Classes Begin 
Reading Week 
Fall Quarter Ends 

WINTER 

Classes Begin 
Reading Week 
Winter Quarter Ends 



1986-87 
(tentative) 



September 15 
November 21 

January 5 
March 13 



March 24 
March 28 
April 28-May 2 
May 23 



SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Reading Week 
Spring Quarter Ends 



March 23 



May 22 

*Registration is accepted for adds, drops or changes through the first week of classes in 
each quarter. 

ST. MARY OF THE LAKE SEMINARY: 



1985-86 

April 22-May 6 
September 9 
October 16-30 
November 15 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 
Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 
Fall Quarter Ends 



1986-87 

May 5-16 

September 8 

October 15-29 

November 14 



December 2 
December 21-Jan. 
January 17-31 
February 21 



March 10 
March 26-April 
May 5-16 
May 23 



WINTER 

Classes Begin 
Christmas Recess 
Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 

SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 



December 1 

TBA 

January 16-30 

February 20 



March 9 

April 15-21 

May 4-15 

May 22 



20 



SEABURY-WESTERN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY: 



1985-86 

September 26-27 
September 30 
November 25-29 
December 2-3 
December 13 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 
Classes Begin 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Registration for Winter Quarter 
Fall Quarter Ends 



1986-87 
To Be Announced 



January 2 
February 24-25 
March 7 



WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 



March 17 
March 27-28 
May 24 



SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Spring Quarter Ends 



TRINITY EVANGELICAL DIVINITY SCHOOL: 



1985-86 

September 26-30 
September 30 
November 19-20 
November 28-Dec. 
December 20 



FALL 

Registration for Fall Quarter 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Fall Quarter Ends 



1986-87 

September 25-29 

September 29 

November 18-19 

November 27-Dec. 1 

December 19 



January 6 
February 25-26 
March 21 



WINTER 

Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 



January 5 

February 24-25 

March 20 



March 31 
April 5 

May 20-21 
June 13 



SPRING 

Classes Begin 
Good Friday Recess 
Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 
Spring Quarter Ends 



March 30 

March 28 

May 19-20 

June 12 



21 



INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE LISTINGS 



ORGANIZATION OF COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

In the section of "Course Descriptions" the courses of the ACTS schools are listed for 
each quarter according to an outline of major areas of study as follows: Biblical Studies, 
Historical Studies, Theological Studies, Ethical Studies, World Mission Studies and 
Ministry Studies. There are subdivisions indicated within each area. 

Within each unit of the listings, courses are given in alphabetical order of the offering 
schools. 



ABBREVIATIONS 

Each course number is preceded by the initials of the institution by which it is offered, 
as follows: 

BTS Bethany Theological Seminary 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

M/L Meadville/Lombard Theological School 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

NBTS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

SML St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 

S-WTS Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

SCJ Spertus College of Judaica 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

UA The Urban Academy 

The H suffix on a course number indicates that the course is taught in Spanish or bi- 
lingually in Spanish and English. If a course is taught in Spanish only, the course 
description is given in Spanish. 

The standard abbreviations (M,T,W,Th,F) are used for days of the week. TBA is used 
to indicate that a professor or time for a course remains to be arranged (see note regar- 
ding updating course listings in the section on cross-registration below). 



EXPLANATIONS OF COURSE NUMBERS: 



BTS: 

Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Studies 

H- Historical Studies 

T - Theological Studies 

E - Ethical Studies 

W- World Mission Studies 

M- Ministry Studies 

I - Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 

CTU: Same as BTS above 



Levels of courses: 

300-399 - Introductory 
400-499 - Intermediate 
500-599 - Advanced 
600-699 - Doctoral 



22 



CTS: 

Fields of study: 

CH - Christian Heritage 

TEC - Theology, Ethics and Contemporary Culture 

CM - Christian Ministries 



Levels of study: 

Same as BTS above 



G-ETS: 

Fields of study: 

1 1 - Old Testament 

12 - New Testament 

13 - Church History 

21 - Theology 

22 - Ethics and Society 

31 - Preaching and Worship 

32 - Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 

33 - Christian Education 

34 - Church Administration and Evangelism 



Levels of courses: 

501-599 - Foundational courses 
601-699 - Advanced courses 



LSTC: Same as BTS above 
MTS: Same as BTS above 
M/L: Same as BTS above 



NPTS: 

Fields of study: 

B - Biblical Field 
H - Historical Field 
T - Theological Field 
M - Ministry Field 



Levels of courses: 

100-199 - Core or introductory courses 
200-299 - Elective or intermediate courses 
300-399 - Seminar courses 



NBTS: 

Fields of study: 

B - Biblical History and Thought 

C - Christian History and Thought 

M - Ministries of the Church 

I - Integrative or Cross-Divisional Studies 



Levels of courses: 

Same as BTS above 



SML: 

Fields of study: 

B - Bible 

S - Systematic Theology 

M - Christian Life 

H - Church History 

MS - Ministerial Sciences 



Levels of courses: 

200-299 - Introductory 
300-399 - Intermediate 
400-499 - Advanced, requiring research 



23 



S-WTS: 

Fields of study: 

01 - Old Testament 

02 - New Testament 

03 - Church History 

05 - Theology 

06 - Spirituality 

08 - Ethics and Society 

09 - Liturgies 

1 1 - Preaching and Church Music 

12 - Christian Education 

13 - Pastoral Psychology and Care 

14 - Church Administration/Small Church 

15 - Theological Bibliography 

TEDS: 

Fields of study: 

OT - Old Testament Studies 

A - Biblical Archaeology 

NT - New Testament Studies 

CH - Church History and the History of 

Christian Thought 
ME - Mission and Evangelism 
ST - Biblical and Systematic Theology 
PR - Philosophy of Religion 
CE - Christian Education 
PC - Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
H - Homiletics 
PT - Pastoral Theology 



Levels of courses: 

500-599 - Introductory 

600-699 - Intermediate; prerequisites or 

permission of instructor 

required 
700-799 - Advanced; permission of 

instructor required 



Levels of courses: 

500-599 - Introductory courses 
600-799 - Intermediate courses 
800-899 - Advanced courses 
900-999 - Research courses 



HOW CROSS-REGISTRATION WORKS 

Students of any of the ACTS schools may take courses from any of the other member 
schools directly and with no added charges. Cross-registration into courses of Spertus 
College of Judaica and the Urban Academy (see pp. 14-15) may involve differing pro- 
cedures and payment in each school; students are responsible to determine what par- 
ticulars apply at their own schools. 

Exceptions to the process of cross-registration exist a) during the summer quarter 
when tuition is normally paid to the school offering the course; b) for D.Min. courses 
other than Pastoral Care and Counseling; c) in certain courses with limited enrollment. 
Each school in ACTS reserves the right to limit enrollment in certain courses for 
pedagogical reasons and to set its own policies for the admission of students from other 
schools to such courses. Courses limited to small numbers because they are taught in 
seminar or practicum style are generally indicated in the following listing of courses. 
Students are advised that certain other courses may at times grow so large that enroll- 
ment in them must be restricted in the registration process or during the first week of 
class. Every effort will be made to inform students of this possibility as early as possible 
through the Registrars of their own schools. It is strongly recommended that students 
planning to enroll in courses which may be limited make alternative course selections in 
advance. 

It should be noted that, although the following listings were accurate when published, 
each school issues a list of changes and corrections just prior to registration for each 
quarter. These lists should be consulted through the Registrar of each school. 



24 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FALL 1985 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

GENERAL 

BTS B-310 

Introduction to Biblical Languages 

This course is aimed at providing the student with 
an introductory knowledge in both Hebrew and 
Greek. Its primary purpose is to enable individuals 
to use an interlinear Bible and to do word studies 
using the Hebrew and Greek words. 
Roop WF 1-2:20 Fall 

LSTC B-601 

Graduate Biblical Seminar 

Graduate students in the Biblical field will make 
presentations based on their specialized interests 
and scholarly research. (For post-M.Div. students. 
Admission of others by consent of instructor.) 
Michel T 2:30-5 Fall 



OLD TESTAMENT 
L INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-323 

Introduction to the Old Testament 

The goal of this course is to give the student an in- 
troduction to the history and thought of Israel in 
Old Testament times. The student will read a 
history of the life and literature of Israel plus other 
student selected materials. 
Roop WF 8-9:20 Fall 

CTU B-300 A, B 

Old Testament Introduction 

Analysis of the phenomenon of Sacred Scripture as 
a religious norm, its manifestations in ancient Israel 
and early Judaism and its role in the faith and life 
of the Church; an introduction to some of the 
literary and theological issues involved in Biblical 
interpretation. 

Hoppe Sec. A. MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Hoppe Sec. B T 7-9:30 pm Fall 

CTS CH-301 

People & Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the pro- 
blems of the historical and theological interpreta- 
tion of the Old Testament against the background 



of the development of historical methods of biblical 

study. 

LaCocque MW 2-3:20 Fall 

G-ETS 11-501 

Old Testament Interpretation: Pentateuch 

and Former Prophets 

Introduction to the critical, historical, and 
theological study of the Hebrew Scriptures, with 
emphasis on the development of interpretive skills 
in the Pentateuch (Genesis-Deuteronomy) and the 
Former Prophets (Joshua-Kings). 
Nash TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

Nash/TBA MTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTC B-312 

Old Testament Studies III 

A survey course covering the biblical books other 

than the Pentateuch and the Prophets, the In- 

tertestamental literature, Old Testament 

hermeneutics, and a brief introduction to the 

Talmud. 

Michel MWF 8:8-50 Fall 

Fuerst TTh 8:30-9:45 -(-discussion sec. Spring 

MTS B-301 

The Yahwist Revolution: Introduction to the 

Old Testament 

Introduction to Israel's antecedents, birth as a peo- 
ple, and early life as a nation, focusing on Genesis 
to I Samuel. Attention is given to appropriate 
critical methods for general Old Testament study, 
and to the content and theology of Israel's early 
epic traditions and law. 
Boling TTh 10-11:50 Fall 

NBTS B-323 

Old Testament Archaeology, History 

and Content 

This course is an introduction to the history of an- 
cient Israel. Attention is given to relevant ar- 
chaeological work done in the Near East and to the 
content of the historical books of the Old Testa- 
ment. 
Bjornard WF 10:40-12:00 Fall 



25 



Old Testament 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B-410 
Early Prophecy 

Classical or Writing Prophecy as it arose and 
developed within covenant traditions and the pro- 
phetical guilds. By close attention to the text we 
analyze literary forms and such religious motifs as 
remnant and day of the Lord in Amos, Yahweh- 
Spouse in Hosea, Jerusalem Davidic royalty and 
faith in Isaiah, vocation and prayer in Jeremiah. 
Stuhlmueller T 7-9:30 pm Fall 

G-ETS 11-603 
Prophetic Books 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and "The 
Twelve" (Hosea-Malachi). Emphasis on analytical 
and synthetic interpretive skills. Examples of 
topics: The Book of Isaiah, The Book of Amos, The 
Suffering Servant, Ezekiel's Vision. 
TBA MTh 1-30-3:20 Fall 

NBTS B-424 

The Book of Isaiah 

An exegetical study of the Book of Isaiah based on 
English translations. It will cover the more impor- 
tant sections of the whole book, seeking the dif- 
ferent historical, cultural and religious situations 
that are presupposed in the messages. We will in- 
quire into its relevance for today. Prereq: B-323 
and B-324. 
Bjornard WF 8-9:20 Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 
CTS CH-403 
Sin and Guilt 

Prolegomena to a discussion of the presence of Evil 
in the world (moral and physical). This course is an 
exploration into the Ethics of the Bible and its An- 
thropology. We plan to examine the corresponding 
teachings of selected religious and philosophical 
systems on the topic of offense and evil. 
LaCocque T 2-5 Fall 

LSTC B-427 
Studies in Jeremiah 

Consideration of the content and message of the 
book, with attention given to critical problems and 
issues affecting Old Testament prophecy in general. 
Fuerst TF 1-2:15 Fall 



NPTS B130 

Jews, Christians and the Bible 

In an attempt to combine practical and academic 
approaches, class members will visit various 
synagogues, meet Jewish and Christian leaders, as 
well as pursue the traditional classroom activity of 
lecture and film presentations. 
Holmgren T 7-10 pm Fall 

NPTS B320 

The Faith of the Psalmist 

An appreciation of the faith of Israel (including its 
relationship to New Testament proclamation) is 
presented by means of an exegetical-theological 
study of selected Psalms. Prereq: B120 and B121. 
Holmgren MTT/i 8-9:15 Fall 

TEDS OT 731 

Old Testament Theology 

The historical origins and developments of the car- 
dinal religious ideas of the O.T. and the interrela- 
tionships of Mosanism, Prophetism, and Wisdom 
are analyzed with emphasis on the value and mean- 
ing of the basic teaching of the O.T. for an 
understanding of the N.T. 
Kaiser TBA Fall 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

MTS B-32 1/322 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis I, II 

A non-divisible two-quarter sequence involving 
the learning of the elements of Hebrew grammar 
followed by translation and exegesis of selected por- 
tions of the Hebrew Bible, primarily prose. Atten- 
tion will be given to fundamentals of text criticism 
and general principles of biblical interpretation. 
Double course. 

Welborn/Adj. 9/3-21 Fall Pre-Term 

Campbell Sec. 1: MTWTh 8-8:50 Fall 

Campbell Sec. 2: MTWTh 9-9:50 Fall 

NPTS B102 
Intermediate Hebrew 

To assist students in developing a greater facility 
with the Hebrew language, varied texts from the 
Hebrew Bible are selected for reading and discus- 
sion. Prereq: B100 and B101. 
Holmgren (B102) TBA Fall 

Holmgren (B103) TBA Winter 

Phelan (B104) TBA Spring 



26 



Old Testament 



New Testament 



NBTS/BTSB-311a 
Hebrew I 

This course is the first quarter of a two-quarter se- 
quence intended to teach Hebrew grammar and 
synatx inductively from the Masoretic text of 
Genesis 1-8 so that the student may independently 
red biblical Hebrew with suitable reference aids. 
Nasgowitz TWF 1-1:50 Fall 



students to the methods of understanding and in- 
terpreting the New Testament. A variety of 
methods will be used, with emphasis on the use of 
texts of the New Testament to implement the 
methods and to explore their value. Prereq: Greek. 
Linss MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

Krentz MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

Danker MW 11-12:15 Fall 



S-WTS 01/02-503S 

Introduction to Biblical Languages 

The course is designed to provide a very basic 
understanding of biblical Greek and biblical 
Hebrew. They will be located within their language 
families so that the elementary structure of the 
languages can best be illumined. The alphabets, 
some vocabulary, and other appropriate exegetical 
tools will also be studied. 
Garvey TBA Fall 

S-WTS 01-624S 
Intermediate Hebrew 

Rapid reading in a selected portion of the text. 

Both prose and poetry will be read. Attention 

given to comprehension of the passages, building of 

vocabulary, understanding of grammar, syntax and 

style. 

Garvey TBA Fall 



NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH-322 

Beginnings of Christian Theology 

A study of the beginnings and development of the 
main strands of Christian thinking, from the 
emergence of the resurrection faith through 
Irenaeus. 



Scroggs 



MW 11-12:20 



Fall 



G-ETS 12-502 

New Testament Interpretation: 

Acts — Revelation 

Theory and practice of exegesis of selected 
epistolary texts, with attention to the history of 
early Christianity. Exploration of the theology of 
Paul, Acts, and of late NT. writings. Presentation 
of various viewpoints through team-taught lectures 
and exegetical section meetings in groups. 
]ewett/Stegner T 6-7:50 pm (+ groups) Fall 

LSTC B-335 

New Testament Interpretation 

An inductive course designed to introduce the 



NPTS B240 

Interpreting the New Testament: The Gospels 

In this introductory treatment of the Gospels, at- 
tention will be given to hermeneutics, critical 
studies and Jesus' proclamation of the Kingdom. 
Phelan MTTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B-435 

The Gospel According to Luke 

An analysis of the entire Gospel and its major 
theological themes. Particular attention will be 
given to the evangelist's role as interpreter of the 
Jesus tradition for a missionary community. The 
course will consider the theological and ministerial 
relevance of Luke's message for such questions as 
poor and rich, Church leadership and prayer. 
Karris MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

CTU B-452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought of Paul in his cultural and 
theological setting. Study of such Pauline motifs as 
law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death and 
resurrection, Church and apostleship - and their 
import for the contemporary Church. 
Osiek TFh 10-11:15 Fall 

G-ETS 12-602 

The Gospel of Matthew 

A critical interpretation of Matthew, focusing on 
the forms and uses of the Jesus-tradition, the 
literary relations to Mark, and the theology and 
purposes of the evangelist. Particular attention to 
the Sermon on the Mount and the Jewish 
background of the gospel. Prereq: 12-501. 
Stegner TFh 9-10:50 Fall 

LSTC B-488 

Hebrews through Revelation 

For the student who wishes to complete the study 
of the New Testament (after Gospel Tradition and 
Pauline Tradition) with a course covering the re- 



27 



New Testament 



maining books. Historical setting, content and ex- 
egesis of selected passages. 
Linss MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

NPTS B140 
Gospel of Mark 

A literary approach will be used to study the major 
themes and the message of the Gospel of Mark. 
Special attention will be given to the function of 
the Gospel in the life of the church. Intensive. 
Phelan 12/2-20, MTWTh 8-12 Fall Post-Term 

S-WTS 02-603S 
The Fourth Gospel 

The study of the Gospel of John in the context of 

its historical environment. 

Pervo TBA Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-332 

New Testament Theology 

A study of the various theologies of the New Testa- 
ment with special emphasis on Paul and John. The 
course is also designed to demonstrate the role of 
the books of the New Testament in the several 
theological traditions. 
Snyder WF 10:40-12 Fall 

CTU B-491 

Liberation Hermeneutic and 

Socio-Historical Exegesis 

Until recently biblical scholars have employed ex- 
egetic methods deriving from the humanities. Latin 
American theologians, however, prefer to seek in- 
spiration in the social and behavioral sciences. We 
will examine various attempts recently made by 
liberation theologians to exploit the exegetical 
potential of the hermeneutic of suspicion and 
ideology critique. 
Reynolds W 2:30-5 Fall 

CTU 1-495 

The Bible Exegeted and Preached: 

The Gospel of John 

Through lecture and discussion key passages and 
theological themes of the Gospel of John and the 
liturgical use of John's Gospel during the major 
seasons of the Church year will be explored. 
Students will preach on the texts under discussion. 
Meets the requirement of B-440 (J°hn) and assists 



the student working 

preaching. Lab fee. 

Hughes /Osiek M 2:30-5 



toward competency in 
Fall 



CTU B-526 

Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

Designed to deepen the student's understanding of 
the relationship of Christianity to rabbinic Judaism 
and to develop a capacity to interpret Jewish 
sources, this seminar will examine the nature of 
rabbinic Judaism and the rabbinic mind through 
an exploration of pertinent talmudic and midrashic 
material using the method of the Talmudic Sages. 
Perelmuter T 1-3:30 Fall 

CTS CH-522 

Post- War Judaism and Christianity 

A seminar devoted to the events and thinking of 
the reconstruction of Judaism and the emerging in- 
dependence o{ Christianity after the war against 
the Romans in 66-70 c.e. Themes of legalism, 
persecution, apologetics, and dialogue and conflict 
between the now-sister religions will be studied. 
Prereq: CH-321 or equivalent. 
Scroggs TFh 11-12:20 Fall 

LSTC B-629 
Miracles and Portents 

Participants in the seminar will examine New 
Testament . reports of extraphysical and psychic 
phenomena in the light of related Greco-Roman 
accounts, literary and documentary. Prereq: 
Greek. (For post-M.Div. students; admission of 
others by consent of instructor.) 
F. Danker M 7-10 pm Fall 

NPTS B180 
Women in Ministry 

A team-teaching approach will allow for investiga- 
tion of both exegetical-theological and socio- 
psychological concerns. Focus will be placed on 
pastoral issues that relate to women in ministry 
such as authority and submission, sexuality, and 
the attitudes of society and church. 
Snodgrass/ Armstrong T 2-5 Fall 

NBTSB-431 

New Testament Theology 

This course is designed to introduce the discipline 
of New Testament theology from the perspective of 
its history and task and to provide an overview of 
the various theological perspectives represented in 
its writings. Special attention will be devoted to the 
question of the unity of New Testament theology. 
Cosgrove WF 10:40-12 Fall 



28 



New Testament 



TEDS NT 761 

New Testament Theology 

Study of the major themes of N.T. theology, the 
distinctive contributions of the biblical authors, 
and the issue of unity and diversity within the 
canon of the N.T. 
Grudem TBA Fall 



NPTSB111 

Introduction to Greek Exegesis 

In addition to a review of forms and grammar, at- 
tention will be given to translation, the procedure 
and tools for exegesis, and an introduction to tex- 
tual criticism. Pass-Fail option available. 
Snodgrass MTTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

BTS/NBTS B-316a 
New Testament Greek I 

This course, together with B-316b New Testament 
Greek II, is a basic introduction to the grammar 
and vocabulary of the Greek New Testament. 
Skills for translation are developed. 
N. Holsey WF 1-2:20 Fall 

BTS B-413 

Greek Exegesis: Hebrews 

A study of the book of Hebrews according to the 
Greek text. Prereq: Elements of New Testament 
Greek or the equivalent. 
Homing WF 1-2:20 Fall 

G-ETS 12-641/2 
Elementary Greek I/II 

Essential forms and principles of New Testament 
Greek. Two unit course, credit for 12-641 after 
satisfactory completion of 12-642. 
TBA TWThF 8-8:50 (I) Fall 

TBA TWThF 8-8:50 (U) Winter 

LSTC B-300 

Biblical Greek for Ministry 

A carefully structured intensive course to prepare 
students for the theological curriculum. An in- 
depth exposure to the elements of New Testament 
Greek grammar, equivalent to an academic term. 
Enriched by opportunities for worship in Greek 
Orthodox churches, discussion of Greek culture, 
etc. 
Krentz/Staff 9/3-21 M-F 8:30-11:30 FallPre-Term 

MTS B-324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I, II 

Study of elementary Greek grammar, practice in 
translation, with introductory attention to ex- 
egesis. A non-divisible course of two quarters. 
Welborn Sec. 1 : MTWTh 9- 1 Fall 

Welborn Sec. 2: TF 2-4 Fall 

Welborn Sec. 1: MTWTh 9-10 Winter 

Welborn Sec. 2: TF 2-4 Winter 



NPTSB112 

New Testament Greek Readings 

To increase the facility of students in reading 
Greek, various passages from the New Testament 
will be translated. Open to all students who have 
had Beginning Greek and Introduction to Exegesis. 
Pass-Fail. 

Snodgrass (B 11 2) TBA Fall 

Snodgrass (B 11 3) TBA Winter 

Snodgrass (B 11 4) TBA Spring 

NBTSB-316aH 

Griego del Nuevo Testamento I 

(New Testament Greek I) 

Este curso, junto con B316bH, es una introduccion 

basica a la gramatica y el vocabulario del griego del 

Nuevo Testamento. El estudiante se aprendara a 

traducir. 

Savolainen 9/30-1 1 /6 M WF 2-4 Fall 

NBTSB-316bH 

Greigo del Nuevo Testamento II 

(New Testament Greek II) 

Este curso es la continuacion de B316aH. 
Savolainen 11/6-12/13MWF 2-4 Fall 

S-WTS 02-52 1S/02-522S 
Elementary Greek I and II 

A two-quarter course of introduction to the gram- 
mar, vocabulary and translation of the Greek 
language as it is employed in the New Testament 
and early Christian texts. 

Pervo TBA (1) Fall 

Pervo TBA (11) Winter 

TEDS NT 703 
Advanced Greek Exegesis 

Intensive exegetical study of a selected book 
evaluating the methods and conclusions of 
representative commentaries in light of recent 
studies in grammar and textual criticism. Prereq: 
NT. Greek Exegesis. 
Moo TBA Fall 



29 



Historical Studies 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-346 

History of Christianity I 

An overview of Christian history from the 
apostolic period to the Reformation. Topics in- 
clude the presuppositions of Christian history, the 
early church and Roman culture, the Constanti- 
nian church, the Augustinian synthesis, the con- 
version of Europe, monastic orders, and Eastern 
Orthodoxy. 
Wagner WF 10:40-12 Fall 

CTU H-300 
Early Christianity 

A study of the development of doctrine to the 
Council of Chalcedon. Major themes: Christian 
self-identification vis-a-vis Judaism and Pagan 
culture, conflicts between Orthodoxy and Heresy, 
trinitarian christological and anthropological 
disputes with due respect to chronology and set- 
ting. Emphasis is placed on doctrine rather than in- 
stitutions. 

Chirovsky MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

Chirovsky MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU H-302 

Early Expansion of Christianity 

A study is made of the experience of the Church in 
mission as it encounters new cultures and changes 
from being a Jewish community into a Graeco- 
Roman Community. Institutional, devotional and 
doctrinal developments are all considered. 
hlemer MW 10-11:15 Fall 

G-ETS 13-501 

History of Christianity I 

Historical analysis of the early and medieval 
church in its life and thought from the post-New 
Testament period to the 11th century. 
Ruether TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

Groh MTh 1:30-3:20 Winter 



G-ETS 13-503 

History of Christianity III 

Key events, people and concepts in the 19th and 
20th centuries with attention to theological, ethical 
and institutional formulations and power struc- 
tures, as well as to contributions of the Black 
church, women, and Third World Christians. 
Cason MTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

Murphy WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTC H-330A 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and Modern 
Church History outside America, designed to show 
in broad perspective the movements which have 
shaped world Christianity in our time. Lectures 
and discussion of selected source readings. 
Hendel MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

LSTC H-330B 

Studies in Reformation and 

Modern Church History 

A survey course for students with some 
background in church history, using the thematic 
approach to study interaction between church and 
culture, including the influence and effect of 
cultural developments on Christian self- 
understanding. (An alternative to H-330A.) 
Fischer MW 11-12:15 Fall 

MTSH-3 19/320 

The Growth of the Christian Tradition: 

A History of Christian Doctrine 

The course will seek a critical understanding of 
what the Church believed, taught, and confessed 
as it encountered its world - such an understan- 
ding being necessary for reflection upon the Chris- 
tian life and the Church's calling. Part One: From 
the development of the Catholic tradition to the 
theology o{ Augustine. Part Two: From Augustine 
to the 17th Century. 

Schafer MW 2-3:50 Fall 

Rigdon TTh 10-11:50 Winter 



G-ETS 13-502 

History of Christianity II 

Major issues, ideas, events and persons in the 
history of the church from the 11th century 
through the 18th century, with special emphasis on 
late medieval Christianity and the origins of Pro- 
testantism. 

Stein WF 9-10:50 Fall 

Rogers MW 3:30-5 Winter 



NPTSH110 

The Christian Heritage I: 

The Early Medieval Church 

A basic introduction is provided by this course to 
the history of the Christian church from apostolic 
times through the Middle Ages, with emphasis on 
the expansion of the church, persons, institutional 
growth and theological development. 
P.Anderson MTTh 11:40-12:55 Fall 



30 



NBTS C-342 

Reformation and Modern Christianity 

This course is an examination of major issues and 
developments in Christian life and thought from 
the time of the Reformation to the present. Stu- 
dent research, analysis and evaluation of selected 
topics constitute a vital part of the course. 
Ohlmann TTh 11-12:20 Fall 

NBTS C-442 

Protestant Evangelicalism 

An examination of characteristic evangelical em- 
phases through a study of their development in the 
thought of the Protestant Reformers, the Anabap- 
tists, Puritans in England and America, German 
Pietists, John Wesley, the Evangelicals in England 
and later American Evangelicals. 
Dayton W 7-9:40 pm Fall 

SMLH-211 
Patrology I 

Between the end of the Apostolic Age and the 
Council oi Nicaea, great Christian thinkers arose 
in the Church. Contemporary studies in theology 
must take into account the manner in which they 
heard and responded to the Word of God in 
witness to their faith in Jesus Christ. 
Cunningham WF 8:25-9:45 Fall 

S-WTS 03-50 IS 

General Church History I: 

The Early Church (100-600) 

A survey of church history from the time of the 
Apostolic Fathers to that of St. Gregory the Great 
with emphasis upon the development of ecclesial 
and theological traditions. 
Haugaard TBA Fall 



IL HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 

TRADITIONS 

CTUH-431 

From Newman to Vatican II 

The following subjects will be examined: an in- 
troduction to Newman; the cultural forces that in- 
fluenced Vatican I; Leo XIII: progressive or reac- 
tionary? (social issues, Anglican Orders, discipline); 
modernism and the mentality of the Church op- 
posing it; the Second Vatican Council responds to 
the era. 
Ross MW 3:30-4:45 Fall 



Historical Studies 

CTS CH-467 

Tradition and History in the 

United Church of Christ 

The UCC is a young denomination still finding its 
identity. This course begins with the general ques- 
tion of how tradition informs identity and then 
moves on to explore the specific historical sources 
which can be claimed by those who are currently 
shaping the UCC. 
Bass MW 9:30-10:50 Fall 

G-ETS 13/21/34-671 
John Wesley, His Life, Theology, and 
Ecclesiology (United Methodist History/ 
Doctrine/Polity A) 

A study of the foundational contribution of John 
Wesley to the history, doctrine and polity of emerg- 
ing Methodism, based on his sermons, letters, and 
treatises {Vi unit). 
Rogers Th 6-7:50 pm Fall 

LSTC H-360 

The Lutheran Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are nor- 
mative for Lutheran ministry and church life to- 
day. Recent interconfessional dialogues are taken 
into account. 

Scherer MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Pero MW 1-2:15 Spring 

M/L H-394 

Unitarian Universalist History 

An introduction to Unitarian Universalist history, 
focused toward preparing ministers to help con- 
gregations become aware of the heritage of liberal 
religion. Brief introductions to Polish, Transylva- 
nian, and English Unitarianism and Universalism 
will precede the major emphasis of the course, 
which will be on American Unitarianism and 
Universalism, 
Godbey TBA Fall 

NBTS C-345 

History of the Black Church in America 

Development of the Black Church from slavery 
times to the present. Also discussion of African in- 
fluence, major leaders and contemporary trends. 
F. Jones Th 7-9:40 pm Fall 

TEDS CH 752 

The Reformation Era 

Historical and theological overview of the changes 



31 



Historical Studies 



in the history of Western Christendom through 

Luther's rediscovery of the Gospel. 

Petersen TBA Fall 



III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

CTS CH-580 

Studies in the History of Christian Thought: 

Kierkegaard 

A seminar dealing with the principal writings of a 
major figure in the development of Christian 
thought. The writer chosen for study will be con- 
sidered both in the context of his own time and in 
terms of his relevance for contemporary theological 
work. 
LeFevre W 2-5 Fall 

S-WTS 03-616S 
Richard Hooker 

A study of the preeminent theologian of the 
sixteenth-century Church of England with atten- 
tion both to the situation of the church in 
Elizabethan England and to the contemporary 
significance of Hooker for the ecumenical Chris- 
tian community. 
Haugaard TBA Fall 



V. SELECT TOPICS IN 
CHURCH HISTORY 

BTS H-340 

The Believers' Church 

A study of the meaning, rise, and development of 
the Free Church tradition within Christianity 
from the Reformation to the present day and its im- 
plications for contemporary churches. 
Durnbaugh TTh 8-9:20 Fall 

CTU H-426 

Growth of Church in Asia and South Pacific 

This course will examine the growth of Christiani- 
ty in Asia and the South Pacific through the agen- 
cy of various churches and mission societies in the 
19th and 20th centuries. The student chooses a 
particular country or church or missionary society 
for in-depth study. 
Nemer TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

G-ETS 13-614 

History of the Sacraments 

A study of major theological positions on baptism 
and the Lord's Supper, and of the history of 
sacramental practice in the church. 
Rogers MW 3:30-5 Fall 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

BTS H-345 
Civil Religion 

Although church and state are legally separated in 
the United States, there is wide adherence to a 
religion of the nation. Since the time of the 
Puritans, Americans have tended to think of 
themselves as God's chosen people. This *aith- 
stance will be studied through typical literary ex- 
pressions and recent interpretations. 
Durnbaugh W 7-9:45 pm Fall 

NPTS H353 

The Emergence of Evangelicalism in America 

The course is an examination of the roots of 
evangelicalism in the American church in the 19th 
century and how that finds expression in 20th cen- 
tury neo-evangelicalism. 
G. Anderson Th 2-5 Fall 



G-ETS 13-642 

Selected Topics in American Religious 

History: Sex and Race in American History 

Examination of significant issues, movements, and 

persons. Prereq: 13-502 or 503. 

Murphy Th 7-9:50 pm Fall 

G-ETS 13-669 

Dialogue with Other Faiths and Ideologies 

The interaction of Christians with other belief 
systems for life orientation. The meaning and goals 
of dialogue, the relation of belief to social participa- 
tion, the significance of the past and the hope for 
the future as seen through mutual challenge. 
Prereq: 13-501, 502, 503. 
Cason Th 1:30-4:20 Fall 

LSTC H-439 

The English Reformation 

An examination of the course of the Reformation 
in England. Special emphasis on the role of such in- 
dividuals as Henry VIII, Cromwell, and Crammer, 
the interrelationship between political and 
religious concerns in the English Reformation, and 
the Elizabethan settlement. 
Hendel MW 1-2:15 Fall 



32 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



LSTC H-520 

Landmarks in Theology: Ancient and Medieval 

A sampling of those theological sources, from 
Irenaeus through Aquinas, which have been most 
fateful for the Christian movement and which still 
set precedents for theology today. 
Bertram W 7-10 pm Fall 

LSTC H-601 

Graduate Historical Seminar 

A seminar for graduate students, designed to ex- 
amine critically the task of historical writing. 
Writings to be studied will focus chiefly on the 
historiography of religion in America. (For 
post-M.Div. students; admission of others by con- 
sent of instructor.) 
Fischer T 2:30-5 Fall 



and the interrelationship between religion, 
material culture and ecology. It discusses some of 
the social and other functions of religion, providing 
opportunities for students to participate in and 
analyze religious expression outside their own faith. 
Gittins MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

CTU T-325 A, B 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and 
methods of theology worked out from a study of 
several case-histories. Special emphasis on the 
historical revelation in Christianity and the 
developing awareness of faith-community in rela- 
tion to shifting horizons. 

Hayes Sec. A: MW 10-11:15 Fall 

Linnan Sec. B: M 7-9:30 pm Fall 



NPTS H/T133 

Early Christian Fathers 

This seminar includes readings and research on the 
development of Christian doctrine by the Eastern 
and Western fathers during the first six centuries of 
the church. Intensive. 
P.Anderson 12/2-20 MTWTh 8-12 Fall Post -Term 

NPTS H2 11 
Christian Classics 

A study of the great devotional classics through the 
centuries is here undertaken. Their historical and 
theological significance will be explored, as well as 
their importance for spiritual formation. 
G. Anderson M 7-10 pm Fall 

SMLH-318 

Structures for Church Unity 

The years since Vatican II have been marked by 
giant leaps and hesitant steps in the task of Chris- 
tian Unity. This course in ecumenical theology in- 
troduces the student to leading persons, significant 
events and noteworthy documents in view of the 
pastoral development of "spiritual ecumenism" at 
the parish level. 
Cunningham WF 9:55-1 1:15 Fall 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

L INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

CTU T-302 
Experience of Religion 

This course examines the significance of religion in 
life. It considers the variety of religious experience 



CTS TEC-500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of theological 
interpretation aiming at developing skills in 
relating theological perspectives to the concrete 
human situation. Non-CTS, permission of instruc- 
tor required. 
LeFevre M 9:30-12:20 Fall 

G-ETS 21-501 
Systematic Theology I 

The meaning and methods of systematic theology; 
Christian understanding of God, Trinity, Crea- 
tion, Persons, and History and Eschatology. 
Prereq: Three foundational courses in Bible and 
History. 

Will WF 9-10:50 Fall 

Young TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 21-605 
Constructive Theology 

The use of studies in biblical, historical and con- 
temporary theology in the formulation of one's 
own understanding of the major Christian doc- 
trines. Prereq: One foundational course each in Bi- 
ble, History and Theology. 
Young WF 9-10:50 Fall 

LSTCT-311 
Christian Theology I 

The first of a three-course sequence providing a 
survey of the basic doctrines of the Christian faith, 
taking into account biblical origins, historical 
developments, and contemporary significance. Em- 
phasis on helping students develop their own 
theological perspectives. Topics in first term in- 



33 



Theological Studies 



elude the doctrines relating to the First Article of 
the Creed. 

Braaten MWF 11-11:50 Fall 

Hefner TTh 11-12:15 Fall 

MTS T-439H 

Teologia Protestante en el Contexto Hispano 

(Protestant Theology in the Hispanic Context) 

El curso examina la teologia protestante, su impac- 
to en los hispanos y la importancia de la inter- 
pretacion teologia hispana contemporanea. 
Gonzalez TBA Fall 

NPTSTl31a 
Systematic Theology I 

Access to theological material raises the question of 
method: how to do it. Reflection is centered on ex- 
perience, church and Scripture as they are directed 
by the Holy Spirit. 
Weborg MTTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 

NBTS C-353 

Christian Theology I: Issues and Approaches 

This course is an introduction to the way in which 
Christians have attempted to support, clarify and 
communicate their faith in various past and pre- 
sent situations. It also is an introduction to the 
leading theologians and fundamental issues in 
Reformation, Enlightenment, Liberal neo- 
Orthodox and more recent periods. Prereq: C-350 
or another course, with instructor's permission. 
Finger TTh 8-9:20 Fall 

SMLS-211 
Fundamental Theology 

This course will examine the foundations of faith 
and theology. It will consider the religious nature 
of humankind, theories of revelation and faith, the 
development of the Christian tradition and its role 
in Christian life, the inspiration of Scripture, and 
the relationship of Christianity to other religions. 
Shea MW 9:55-11:15 Fall 

TEDS ST 511 
Introduction to Theology 

Introduction to theology, historical methodology, 

revelation, inspiration, bibliography, and related 

studies. 

Kantzer TBA Fall 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

BTS T-452 

Theology of Karl Barth 

An inductive study of representative writings. Prin- 
cipal reading will be in the Church Dogmatics. 
Groff/Frantz TTh 9:30-10:50 Fall 

BTS T-457 

Brethren In Theological Perspective 

Theological presuppositions of Brethren 
historiography and development will be examined, 
and present theological trends will be traced. The 
doctrines and practices of the Brethren will be 
discussed in dialogue with contemporary thought. 
Current issues will be delineated. 
Brown WF 8-9:20 Fall 

CTU T-480 

Eastern Christian Theology 

An investigation of the principal topics in theology 
(God, Christ, anthropology, church, tradition) and 
spirituality from the perspective of the Eastern 
Christian traditions. Emphasis will be placed on 
contemporary understandings in the Orthodox 
and Catholic communions. 
Chirovsky MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

CTU T-524 

Roman Catholic Theology in an Age 

of Revolution 

A study of the conflicts in Roman Catholic 
thought in the context of the intellectual, cultural, 
and political upheavals of nineteenth-century 
Europe. The seminar will focus its attention on the 
creative work of the early Catholic faculty at Tub- 
ingen in dialogue with Protestant theology and 
with the philosophy of Hegel and Schelling. 
Hayes MW 1-2:15 Fall 

CTSTEC-451 

Introduction to Public Ministries 

Socio-economic and political introduction to ur- 
ban problems focusing on the churches' ministries 
to urban issues, people and institutions. Course in- 
tended as an introduction to cities in general and 
the Chicago metropolitan area in particular. It is 
also preparation for student planning to enroll in 
the Summer Urban Academy intensive. 
Thistlethwaite/Fukuyama T 2-5 Fall 



G-ETS 21-642 

Judaism in the Early Christian Period 

Examination of the post-biblical literature of 



34 



Theological Studies 



Judaism, with special emphasis on the Talmud - 
its structure, history, and theology, with attention 
to the thought currents in the centuries paralleling 
early Christianity. Vi unit. 
Schaalman W 5:30-7:20 pm Fall 

LSTC T-434 

Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The course consists o( an in-depth analysis of the 
theology and praxis of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 
wrestling with the philosophical and theological 
principles he employed and their relevance in to- 
day's theological marketplace. 
Pero T 2:30-5 Fall 

MTST-419 

The Theology of Schleiermacher 

A seminar on the major theological writings of 
Friedrich Schleiermacher, with a focus on the 
issues of theological method and constructive 
reinterpretation of Christian doctrines in his work. 
Includes an assessment of his contributions to 
liberal theology. 
Parker F 9-11:50 Fall 

M/L TS-395 

Liberal Theology and Mythos 

Introduction to the major theological perspectives 
(Liberal Christianity, Empirical Theism, Religious 
Humanism, Scientific Theology, and Universal 
Religion) and underlying mythic structures 
(biblical, Greek, evolutionary, democratic) of 
organized liberal religion. 
Engel TBA Fall 

NPTS H/T137 
Theology of Kierkegaard 

This seminar will be a study of selected writings of 
this significant 19th century Danish 
philosopher/theologian in their historical contexts. 
P.Anderson W 7-10 pm Fall 

S-WTS 05-60 IS 

God and the Incarnation 

The course traces the doctrines of the Trinity and 
of Christ as they were elaborated in connection 
with the first six Ecumenical Councils. 
Crum TBA Fall 

III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

CTU T-430 

The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

An analysis of why God has become problematic 



for contemporary society is followed by a critical 
review of representative Christian attempts to res- 
pond to this problem. The course seeks to help the 
student evaluate his or her own experience and re- 
spond intelligently to the modern person's problem 
of God. 

Szura TTh 11:30-12:45 Fall 

Phelps MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU T-441 
Christology and Cultures 

A critical review of the development of understand- 
ing of Jesus and salvation in the Christian tradi- 
tion, and their implications in a cross-cultural con- 
text. Special attention is given to models of incar- 
nation and salvation, universal claims about Jesus 
within a religious pluralism, and the question of 
the ethnic Christ. 
Schreher TFh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTU T-470/LSTC T-453 

Current Issues in Jewish-Christian Dialogue 

The 2000-year-old history of Jewish-Christian en- 
counter has taken many forms and has led to 
varied results. This course considers a wide range 
of issues which intersect, sometimes in understand- 
ing and sometimes in confrontation. Studies in 
topics such as election, Messianism, peoplehood 
and the land, Zionism, and the Holocaust. 
Perelmuter/ Sherman M 7 -10 pm Fall 

G-ETS 21-614 

The Vision and Praxis of Shalom 

Consideration of theological and ethical issues 
basic to peace and justice ministries, and guidance 
for the development of education and action pro- 
grams for peace and justice in congregations. 
Will TTh 3:30-5 Fall 

G-ETS 21-636 

Feminist Theology: A Systematic Perspective 

Discussion of the topics of God, Creation, 
Humanity, Sin, Christology, Salvation and 
Church. Focus on the questions raised by Feminist 
Theology for the critique of these traditional motifs 
and on their reconstruction or re-symbolization in 
the light of an affirmation of the full personhood of 
women in partnership with men in the Church. 
Prereq: 21-501. 
Ruether M 1:30-4:20 Fall 

LSTC T-470 

Real Presence, from Ignatius to the 

Lima Document 

Beginning with pre-Christian roots in primitive 



35 



Theological Studies 

animism and Hellenistic philosophy, this seminar 
will explore the development and variations of the 
doctrine of Real Presence in the early church, in 
neo-Platonism and in Luther, culminating in an 
examination of the Baptism-Eucharist-Ministry 
document of the World Council of Churches. 
Tobias TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

LSTCT-601 

Graduate Theological Seminar 

Graduate students in the theological field will 
make presentations based on their specialized in- 
terests and scholarly research. Special attention to 
the question of how the student's theology 
responds to the present cultural setting. In Fall 
1985 the Seminar will focus on the question, "What 
is Religion?" (For post-M.Div. students; admission 
of others by consent of instructor.) 
Braaten MW 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC T-450 

Senior Seminar I: Theology and the 

Church's Ministry 

An integrative course dealing with the role of 
theology in pastoral formation and functioning, 
and based on experiences and problems en- 
countered in internship. Prereq: Internship. 
Anderson TTh 11-12:15 Fall 

Bertram TTh 11-12:15 Fall 

LSTCT-310 

Theology in Multicultural Perspective 

A consideration of the implications for Christian 
faith and practice of contemporary pluralism, and 
especially of the church's encounter with Black and 
Hispanic cultures and with Feminist thought. In- 
cludes field trips and "plunges" in diverse situa- 
tions. 

Bloomquist /Navarro/ TTh 11-12:15 Fall 

Pero/Scherer 

LSTC M-452 
Christianity and Tragedy 

A seminar which probes the relationship between a 
tragic sense and vision of life and a Christian one, 
and the bearing of this relationship on theological 
understanding and Christian proclamation. Basic 
readings are dramatic works of tragedy and selected 
sermons of Paul Tillich. Limited enrollment; con- 
sent of instructor required. 
Niedenthal T 2:30-5 Fall 



MTS T-402 

Baptism and Eucharist 

A study of the Christian doctrines of baptism and 
eucharist, with emphasis on critical analysis of 
various issues now in controversy. Attention will 
be given to the liturgical implications of various 
theological outlooks. 
Burkhart TTh 10-11:50 Fall 

MTS T-407 

God and the World 

Considering issues of cosmology, theology and 
faith raised by the Christian affirmations of God as 
Creator and Sustainer and by the problem of evil. 
Attention will be given to issues of faith and 
science. Prereq: MTS T-301 or equiv. 
Parker M 2-4:50 Fall 

NPTST150 

Theology and Literature 

The possibility of dialogue between contemporary 
secular fiction and Christian theology will be ex- 
plored. Such writers as Updike, Malamud, Kesey, 
and Coover will be read. 
Johnston M 3-5 Fall 

NPTSM170 

Introduction to Theological Research 

The student is introduced to basic research 
methodology and to the basic reference tools of 
theological bibliography. The course is designed to 
encourage experience with a wide variety of 
reference tools. 
Smith Th 1:30-2:30 Fall 

NBTS C-454 

Recent Theological Thought 

This course is an analysis of major themes and 
movements in 20th century theology gained 
through careful reading and discussion of works by 
its major thinkers. Movements covered will include 
late Liberal theology, neo-Orthodoxy, Existential 
theology, recent Catholic theology, Liberation 
theologies, Process theology, theology of Hope and 
Narrative theology. 
Finger Th 7-9:40 pm Fall 

TEDS PR 711 
Religious Epistemology 

Examination of the ways of knowing and tests for 
truth with special emphasis on the problems of 
religious knowledge. 
Hackett TBA Fall 



36 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



IV. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU M-301 

Psychological Dimensions of Religious 

Experience 

This course will examine religious experience 
through an analysis of some phenomenological, 
psychological, and sociological understandings of 
the nature of religious experience followed by the 
development of specific psychological themes 
which appear in this material. 
McCarthy T 1-3:30 Fall 

CTU M-412 

Theology and Forms of Prayer 

Aim: To help students understand their own 
prayer life, to improve on it and to help others. 
After study on prayer in the New Testament, the 
course will examine the different forms of Christian 
prayer (liturgical, private, ways of mental prayer, 
devotions in popular piety) considering their 
development in history and in different cultural 
situations. 
Lozano TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

CTUM-413 

Jesus of Nazareth: Reinterpreting his Spirituality 

Based on the twentieth-century research into the 
personality and history of Jesus, this course will at- 
tempt to give fresh understanding of the spiritual 
experience of Jesus as a source of inspiration for the 
spirituality of his disciples. A personal journal of 
readings and reflections will be required. 
Lozano TTh 11:30-12:45 Fall 

SML M-405 (Sp), H-405, S-405 
Spirituality by Way of Autobiography 

An analysis of the autobiographical writings of 
Augustine, Julian of Norwich, Teresa of Avila, 
Therese of Lisieux, Dietrich Bonhoeffer and 
Thomas Merton reveals the unchanging call of the 
Gospel and the varying cultural and historical 
forms in which Christian spirituality is realized. 
Cameli Th 7 pm Fall 

S-WTS 06-50 IS 

Resources and Issues in Spirituality 

The primary objective of this course is to look at 
options and not to engage in particular practices, 
although a 24-hour retreat in silence is one element 
of the course. Ways of encouraging, supporting, 
and assisting people to be intentional about their 
spirituality are considered. Limited to entering 
students. Vi unit. 
Crura et al. TBA Fall 



ETHICAL STUDIES 
I. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E-379 

Christian Ethics: The Moral Agent 

An introductory study of the place of an agent- 
centered morality and of the notion of virtue 
within Christian ethics. Major areas of concentra- 
tion include Thomas Aquinas and the contem- 
porary virtue approach of Hauerwas. This ap- 
proach will then be contrasted with other contem- 
porary methods in order to ascertain its 
significance for moral decision making. 
Nairn MW 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Nairn MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

CTSTEC-321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical 
systems with a consideration of their implications 
and current significance. 
Schroeder MW 3:40-5 Fall 

LSTCE-310 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the sources, structure, and dynamics of 
Christian ethics, with reference to current pro- 
blems of personal and public life. (Not open to first- 
year students.) 

Sherman TF 1-2:15 Fall 

Bloomquist MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

SML M-212 
Special Moral I 

Various moral problems are examined using the 
case study method. Special attention is directed to 
the examination of magisterial pronouncements. 
The moral principles are clearly established for use 
in pastoral situations. 

Listecki WF 8:25-9:45 Fall 

Listecki WF 9:55-1 1:15 Fall 



II. SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

BTS E-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

The seminar runs continually throughout the year. 
It offers opportunity for common reading of peace- 
related materials; presentation and discussion of 
papers; sharing from peace ministries; and dialogue 
with visiting peace theologians, activists, and 
leaders. One quarter hour credit per quarter. 
Meyer T 3:10-4:40 Fall 



37 



Ethical Studies 



BTS E-461 

Christianity and Economics 

A study of the relationship of the Reformation and 
economic change in the modern world as described 
by Max Weber and Ernst Troeltsch. Problems and 
cases from contemporary economics and the 
business world will be considered from the point of 
view o{ Christian belief. 
Miller Th 7-9:45 pm Fall 

CTU E-374 

On Being A Christian in the World 

The development of a new presence and relevancy 
of the Church in public life and how this 
development is related to a new understanding of 
the Church's mission and of its claim to be "the 
universal sacrament of Salvation." Attention given 
to foundational texts to discover the ability of the 
Christian community to influence social ethics and 
public policy. 

Fornasari MW 11:30-12:45 Fall 

Fornasan MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTS TEC-533 

Contemporary Process Theology and 

Social Ethics 

This seminar will focus on the writings of people in- 
formed by the philosophical theology of A. N. 
Whitehead. Writings will be selected from the work 
of such representative figures as William Beardslee, 
John Cobb, David Griffin, Charles Hartshorne, 
Bernard Lee, Bernard Meland, Schubert Ogden, 
Norman Pittinger, and Daniel Day Williams. 
Schroeder T 2-5 Fall 

G-ETS 22-608 

Strategies for Social Change 

The use of theory (social, political, economic), 
theological commitments, and case studies in the 
analysis and development of strategic options for 
involvement of Christian communities in long- 
term social change, including such issues as peace, 
racism, sexism, and economic oppression. 
Tholin TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

MTS E-400 

Social Ethics in Latin American Theologies 

of Liberation 

The course attempts to make a constructive state- 
ment and develop a systematic understanding of 
the social ethics implicitly present in the writings of 
the theologians of liberation. Special attention will 
be given to their understanding of social justice, 
freedom, equality, authority, democracy, the com- 



mon good and human rights. 
Garcia M 7-9:50 pm 



Fall 



M/L E-393 

Religion and World Peace 

A seminar emphasizing how religious groups work 

on disarmament, development, human rights, and 

conflict resolution, especially through the United 

Nations. 

Jack M 3:30-5:30 Fall 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CTU E-470 

Formation of Conscience 

A study of the various levels of conscience in rela- 
tionship to ethical decision-making. We will discuss 
some basic theories of moral development, and 
their connection to the discovery of self. Students 
will be expected to examine their own development 
of conscience and decision-making process as well 
as the implications for ministry. 
Diesbourg T 1-2:15 Fall 

CTU E-536 

Ambiguity in Moral Decision Making 

A critical assessment of R. McCormick's essay, 
"Ambiguity in Moral Choice," in relationship to 
the tradition which preceded it and to the continu- 
ing debate which has followed it. Among areas 
which will be covered are the notion of ethical 
borderline situations, the development of double- 
effect methodology, "ontic evil," and the "direct- 
indirect" distinction in ethics. 
Nairn W 2:30-5 Fall 

CTU E-556 

The Virtue Tradition in Aquinas: 

Becoming a Friend of God 

The moral vision of Thomas Aquinas will be 
studied through the texts of the Summa. Aquinas 
saw the moral life as the project of making one's 
way back to God. The course will note especially 
the connection Aquinas forges between the pas- 
sions, the virtues, and the Gifts of the Spirit. 
Wadell MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

CTU E-581 

Marriage As a Sacrament 

This course will consider what it means to call mar- 
riage a sacrament, and will examine that by tracing 
the historical development of a theology of mar- 
riage from the scriptural texts through the 



38 



Ethical Studies 



documents of Vatican II. Special attention will be 

given the role of fidelity in marriage. 

Wadell MW 11:3042:45 Fall 

CTU E-588 

Mystery of Christ and Structure of 

Ethical Experience 

The course is designed to study the implications of 
Christology for moral theology, for a Church 
whose claim to be the "universal sacrament of 
salvation" is being challenged by an increasingly 
secular, scientific, culturally and religiously 
pluralistic world. Fundamental Christology and 
Ecclesiology are prerequisite for the course. 
Fomasari W 7-9:30 pm Fall 

LSTC M-472 

The Church as Actor or Reactor in Society 

A consideration of the theological-ethical hurdles 
that keep the church confined to the private sphere 
and from becoming an effective actor in the public 
arena, including issues such as "two kingdoms," 
power, and self-interest. Includes a study of con- 
crete models for the church's involvement in com- 
munity organizing and economic development. 
Bloomquist W 7-10 pm Fall 

LSTC E-439 

Toward a Theology of Peace and Justice 

This course will focus on international economic 
injustice and nuclear weaponry, seeking to gain a 
better understanding of the structural causes of 
these problems, to explore alternative approaches, 
and to discover what guidance the biblical and 
theological tradition of the church might offer. 
Folk MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

MTS E-406 

Women, Race and Class 

A literary, sociological and ethical examination of 
racism, sexism, and classism. The aim of this course 
is to examine the particular nature of each form of 
oppression as well as their linkages. The ethical im- 
perative of reconciliation will serve as the under- 
pinning of the discussion. Implications for ministry 
will be discussed. 
Townes W 6-8:50 pm Fall 

MTS E-412 

Philosophical and Theological Conceptions 

of Justice 

Students will have the opportunity to examine the 
main positions in the contemporary debate about 
social justice. These views will be compared with 



conceptions of justice presented by Catholic and 
Reformed theologians whose work has been rele- 
vant for some political movement, or who have in- 
fluenced the way a significant sector of the Chris- 
tian community thinks about justice. 
Garcia F 9-11:50 Fall 

M/L E-438 

Religion, Ethics and Ecology 

Against the background of the problematic rela- 
tionship that exists historically between Christiani- 
ty and Western attitudes toward the natural en- 
vironment, this course will consider recent 
religious and theological efforts to develop a 
positive environmental ethic. 
Engel TBA Fall 

NBTS C-457b 

Recent Evangelical Social Thought 

This seminar will read and analyze major represen- 
tatives of evangelical social thought from the rise of 
"neo-evangelicalism" after World War II to the pres- 
ent with a special emphasis on the creative period 
of the 1970s. Figures to be studied will include Carl 
Henry, Rich Mouw, Jim Wallis, Steve Mott, Nick 
Wolterstorff and others. 
Dayton T 7-9:40 pm Fall 

SMLM-314M-4 
Medical Ethics 

Progress in recent years in modern medicine has 
greatly benefited humanity and has opened a vast 
area of moral questions for the theologians. After 
discussing some general norms of morality for 
medicine, specific problems, such as abortion, 
sterilization, euthanasia, human experimentation, 
genetic intervention, transplants, fertilization in 
vitro, will be considered. 
Boyle MW 1:15-2:35 Fall 

SMLM-318M-3 
Christian Marriage 

An in-depth study into the real meaning of mar- 
riage and its properties from a theological as well as 
a natural point of view. Practical aspects of "what 
makes a marriage work" will also be considered. 
Boyle MW 2:40-4 Fall 

Boyle MW 2:40-4 Winter 

SCJ E-470 

Spirituality in Action: An Introduction to 

Jewish Ethics 

Approaches to ethical values will be examined after 
considering the nature of the human person from 



39 



Ethical Studies/World Mission Studies 



Ministry Studies 



the perspective of Hebrew Scripture which 
describes the activity of being human, in contrast to 
western philosophical thought which defines the 
human being. Discussion of specific issues, e.g., sex- 
ual, environmental, medial ethics et al. Meets at 
CTU. 
Sherwin T 7-9:30 pm Fall 

UA-460 

Urban Seminar: Community Organization 

Orientation to the theory and practice of com- 
munity organization is provided by means of direct 
street experience, observation of community 
organizations, and sessions with community 
organizers and church leaders from Chicago. Alin- 
sky methods of community organization, issue 
organizing, ethnic group organizations, and ex- 
plicitly church-based organizing are introduced. 
Meets at NPTS. 
Schaper /Simpson W 3-5 Fall 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

CTU W-497 

Mission Integration Seminar 

Specially designed for students returning from a 
cross-cultural training program and furloughed and 
returned missionaries. This seminar, through guid- 
ed sharing and mutual support, is specifically 
designed to help participants process their mission 
experience and their re-entry into their home 
culture. 
Barbour /Rabbiosi M 7-9:30 pm Fall /Winter /Spring 

CTU W-545 

Social Anthropology for Missionaries 

An attempt is made to 'get under the skin' of other 
cultures, by means of lectures and seminars on a 
number of themes specifically chosen for their 
relevance to missionary undertakings. We consider 
inter-culturally, belief, values, socialization, 
language, reality, perception and thinking, and 
other aspects social relationships. 
Gktins MW 1041:15 Fall 

CTU 1-460 

Training for Cross-Cultural Ministry: Intensive 

Provides both theoretical and experiential dimen- 
sions within a global context. Designed to help 
those who are preparing for a cross-cultural 
ministry in a Third World situation abroad or at 
home. Emphasis on the praxis of inter-faith and 
ecumenical dialogue, on learning how to become a 
global person, and on communicating in cultural 



contexts. Practicum fee. 
Barbour /Doidge MW 1-2:15 



Fall 



LSTC W-414 

The Local Church's Multicultural 

World Mission 

The mandate, opportunities, and resources of the 
local church for its own world mission will be ex- 
amined through readings, discussion, seminar 
papers, guest lectures, and audio-visual presenta- 
tions. Focused on equipping lay people for their 
Christian witness in this age of multicultural global 
mobility. 
W. Danker TF 1-2:15 Fall 

NPTS M150 

Theological Bases of Mission 

Theologies and theories of the world mission of the 
church are compared. Evangelical Covenant 
Church mission policies and practices, in addition 
to missionary life in general, are examined. 
Weld TTh 2-4 Fall 

NPTS Ml 54 
Christianity and Culture 

Appreciation of the impact of worldview and 
culture on theology and on Christian forms and 
practices permits more effective communication of 
the gospel. Intensive. 
Weld 12/2-20, MTWTh 8-12 Fall Post-Term 

TEDS ME 726 

Principles of Church Growth 

Consideration of people movements, homogeneous 
units, resistant and receptive peoples; the pro- 
cedures for church growth studies, and the 
signficance of studies already completed. 
Hesselgrave TBA Fall 

MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND PRACTICE 

OF MINISTRY 

CTUM-510 

Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

This full-year three credit course meets about once 
a month. It provides opportunity to read and ex- 
plore for pastoral, theological and psychological 
value the classical primary sources (great books) in 
psychology. 
Szura TBA Fall /Winter /Spring 



40 



Ministry Studies 



CTS CM-300 

The Practice of Christian Ministry 

A course to assist the student in experiencing and 
initiating a style of pastoral and theological reflec- 
tion; to provide the student with the perspective on 
the nature, history and practice of ministry in 
Christian vocation. Open to students other than 
CTS with permission of the instructor. 
Edgerton T 6:30-9:30 pm Fall 

CTSTEC-451 

Introduction to Public Ministries 

(For course description, see Theological Studies 

III.) 

Thistlethwaite/Fukuyama T 2-5 Fall 

G-ETS 34-503 

Principles of Church Administration 

Basic concepts of organizational development and 
systems theory as focused on the church and its 
sub-systems. Attention to the procedure and skills 
needed in developing a mission statement and the 
administrative process. Examination of denomina- 
tional and community resources and expectations 
in their impact on congregational decision making. 
TBA MW 5:30-7:20 pm Fall 

G-ETS 34-611 

Evangelism and the Local Church 

Biblical and theological bases and sociological and 

psychological aspects of evangelism, examination of 

past and present models of evangelism and their 

relation to individual piety, congregational life and 

social issues, introduction to the practice of 

evangelism. 

TBA MTh 1:30-3:20 Fall 

MTSM-312 

Mission Imperatives: Evangelism, Stewardship, 

Social Services, Systemic Change 

and World Community 

An introduction to the church in the world: shar- 
ing the Good News — evangelism; developing 
resources — stewardship; responding to human 
need — social service; organizing for justice — 
systemic change; and seeking peace (shalom) — 
world community; suggesting biblical-theological 
foundations, participant motivations, leadership 
personalities, available resources, case studies and 
model situations. 
Dudley MW 4-5:50 Fall 

NPTS Ml 14a 

Leadership for Pastoral Ministry 

The exploration of the various functions of church 



administration and of the role of the minister in 
the congregation includes: decision-making, polity, 
stewardship, conflict management, goal-setting and 
leadership. The course is designed particularly for 
those entering pastoral ministry. 
Carlson MTTh 10:15-11:30 Fall 

NPTS M171 

Stewardship: Theology and Practice 

Analysis and discussion of biblical, historical, 
theological, and cultural information so that the 
student can more faithfully and effectively lead a 
congregation in its stewardship and financial 
management. Course focus begins broadly with 
consideration of the stewardship of life as a whole 
and then narrows to an intensive look at the 
stewardship of money. Intensive. 
Carlson 12/9-20, MTTh 8-12 Fall Post-Term 

NPTS M267 

Modern Strategies for Church Growing 

The purpose of the course will be to acquaint the 
students with the basic principles of church 
growth. The student will be expected to take the 
basic principles and structure a strategy for 
ministry that will result in both quality and quanti- 
ty of church growth. Intensive. 
Persson 12/2-6, MTWThF 8-12 Fall Post-Term 

NPTS M261 

Theology and Practice of Evangelism 

This course is designed to give the student a basic 

understanding of New Testament evangelism. 

Students will learn to articulate their faith in order 

to effectively practice and teach personal 

evangelism. 

D. Larson M 2-5 Fall 

NPTS M262 

Patterns of Church Renewal 

This course looks at the recurring phenomenon of 
renewal of the life of the church as an important 
aspect of a biblical theology of the church. Focus is 
on biblical principles, historical patterns and con- 
temporary examples of congregational renewal and 
renewal movements. Intensive. 
Synder 12/2-20, MTWTh 8-12 Fall Post-Term 

NPTS M264 

The Healing Ministry of the Church 

This course will explore the place of healing and 
health care within the life of the church. Biblical 
perspectives concerning healing and wholeness will 
be explored in the Old Testament, in the life of 



41 



Ministry Studies 



Pastoral Care 



Christ, and in the early church. 

Granherg-Michcwlson 12/2-6, 

MTWTKF8-12 



Fall Post-Term 



ministry. 
Carlson 



TBA 



Fall 



NPTS M278 
Management Skills 

The course will review basic principles and prac- 
tices of management with a focus on developing 
practical management skills to assist the Christian 
leader in the effective conduct of his/her ministry. 
Attention will be given to planning, organizing, 
staffing, leading, deciding, and communication as 
they relate to the development of Christian 
organizations. 
Wright l2/2-6,MTWThF8-U Fall Post-Term 

NBTS 1-300 

Nature and Mission of the Church 

This course examines the nature and mission of the 
Church from the perspective of each o{ the 
disciplines within the seminary curriculum. This 
interdisciplinary approach seeks to help students 
focus their career goals in ministry and to provide a 
holistic understanding of the Church. 
W.R.Nelson /Faculty WF 8-9:20 Fall 

NBTS M-362 

The Urban Ministry of the Church 

This traveling seminar on urban ministry meets on 
campus for the first and last sessions, and confronts 
a series of very diverse Chicago communities and 
an equally broad range of church ministry 
responses in these contexts. Readings, reflective 
journal, lunches and group participation form the 
core requirements. 
Bakke M 9:30-2 Fall 

NBTS M-578a 

New Church Development in Multiple Settings 

This course will explore the ministry of beginning 
renewed communities of faith based on a holistic 
mission theology and culturally sensitive on-site 
visits throughout the Chicago area representing a 
variety of cultures and strategies. Intensive. 
). Holsey 9/9-13 TBA Fall Pre-Term 

S-WTS 14-50 IS 

Approaches to the Ministry of the Church 

This course is designed to help students refine their 
understanding of ministry in the light of biblical 
and historical precedents and some contemporary 
models. It also introduces students to ministry as 
education, pastoral care, administration, 
preaching, leading worship, and the enabling of lay 



S-WTS 14-604S 

The Dynamics of Ministry: The Small Church 

Basic elements of parish ministry, including the 
identity and organization of the congregation, the 
influence of social context and the task of leader- 
ship as these elements interact with the theology of 
the church in the arena of the local congregation. 
The small church will be used as a point of 
reference for considering the dynamics of parish 
ministry. Limit: 25. 
Dudley TBA Fall 

TEDS PC 611 
Psychology and Theology 

A survey of theories and approaches to the integra- 
tion of psychology and theology. The course will 
evaluate the theories of religious behavior proposed 
by Freud, Jung, James, Allport as well as those of 
more contemporary and evangelical writers. 
Collins TBA Fall 



II. PASTORAL CARE 

CTS CM-433 

Pastoral Care Practicum 

For advanced students who are doing counseling. 
Verbatims and tapes by the students are the data 
for reflection on the theory and practice of pastoral 
psychotherapy and counseling. Consent of instruc- 
tor required. 
Moore W 9:30- J 2:20 Fall 

CTSCM-451 

Gestalt Therapy and Religious Experience 

An exploration and experiencing of Gestalt 
Therapy as one way of understanding contem- 
porary religious experience. (Limited enrollment of 
25 - CTS priority). 
Anderson M 6:30-9:30 pm Fall 

CTS CM-534 
Advanced Pastoral Care 

An advanced seminar in pastoral care focused on 
selected human problems of particular interest to 
the student; e.g., alcoholism, death and dying, 
mid-life crises, etc. Topic for 1985: Child Abuse. 
Seniors and D.Min. only. 
Moore M 2-5 Fall 



42 



Pastoral Care 



G-ETS 32-501 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

An introductory course including a study of 
human development, growth, crisis, and 
pathology: the development of skills in integrating 
theology and the practice of ministry with an 
understanding of human growth and interpersonal 
relationships. Limit: 30. 

Hinkle (32-501 A) MW 3:30-5 Fall 

Ashbrook (32-501 B) TTh9-i0:50 Fall 

Justes (32-501 B) MW 5:30-7:20 pm Winter 

G-ETS 32-611 
Pastoral Theology 

Exploration of the integration of theology with the 
practice of pastoral care and counseling through 
the use of case studies presented by the par- 
ticipants. Limit: 12. Prereq: One foundational 
course each in Old Testament, New Testament, 
and Theology; permission of the instructor. 
justes TTh 9-10:50 Fall 

G-ETS 32-631 

Pastoral Counseling: The Pastor as Counselor 

Exposure to the theory and practice of pastoral 
counseling for the prospective parish pastor. Em- 
phasis given to counseling skill development as well 
as to theological and psychological models of inter- 
pretation. Prereq: 32-501. Limit: 30. 
Hinkle M 7-9:50 pm Fall 

LSTC M-533 

Spirituality and Pastoral Care 

Following an examination of various dimensions of 
spirituality, the spiritual context of pastoral care 
will be explored and students will be guided in pro- 
posing theological interventions in pastoral care 
situations according to a system produced by the 
instructor. Prereq: LSTC M-320 or equiv. 
Bauermeister MW 2:30-3:45 Fall 

LSTC M-520 

Group Dynamics and Group Therapy 

Emphasis upon the learning and therapeutic ex- 
perience amidst the dynamic interactions and in- 
terpersonal relation of an ongoing group situation. 
Psychological and theological reflection as well as 
consideration of small group and communication 
theory. Prereq: CPE. 
Swanson MW 11-12:50 Fall 

LSTC M-440 
Hospice Training 

This course involves working for the school year as 
a volunteer at the Meridian Hospice of Hyde Park, 



where students will receive a "hands on" experience 
in ministry to dying persons and their families. 
Students will also be exposed to the effective use of 
trained volunteers. Extends through Fall, Winter, 
and Spring, with Vs course credit each term. 
Prereq: LSTC M-320 or equiv. 
Bauermesiter/ Staff TBA Fall /Winter /Spring 

LSTC M-503 

Crisis Intervention for the Pastor 

Following a survey of crisis theory, the major types 
of crises confronting the parish clergy as they do 
pastoral care and the intervention techniques they 
require are examined by means of lectures, 
readings, and role training. Prereq: Internship. 
Bauermeister MW 11-12:15 Fall 

LSTC M-622 A and D 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

Supervised clinical work in marriage and family 
therapy in the Marriage and Family Therapy 
Center, Palos Park, IL. Therapy with individuals, 
couples, and families, together with theoretical in- 
put, staff evaluation sessions, and case review. 
(Limited to D.Min. in P.C.C. students.) 
Swanson F 12:30-2:30 Fall 

Bauermeister F 1-2:30 Winter 

Swanson F 1-2:30 Spring 

NPTS Ml 20 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(first year students) 

Case method, role play, demonstrations, readings, 
and lecture impart strategies and skills to equip the 
pastor for working with the congregation to pro- 
vide an effective ministry to personal and family 
needs. 
Hallsten MTh 8-9:15 Fall 

NPTS Ml 20a 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(second year students) 

Case method, role play, demonstrations, readings, 
and lecture impart strategies and skills to equip the 
pastor for working with the congregation to pro- 
vide an effective ministry to personal and family 
needs. 

Hallsten TTh 11:40-12:55, Fall 

Lab: W 7-10 pm or Th 2-5 

NPTS M222 

Human Sexuality and the Church 

Lecture, readings, discussion, case method, and 
films relate the theological, biblical, and 



43 



Pastoral Care 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



psychological aspects of sexuality with an emphasis 
on pastoral counseling applications. Intensive. 
Rallsten 12/9-20, MTWThF 8-12 Fall Post-Term 

NBTS M-395H 

Fundamentos de Consejeria y Cuidado 

Pastoral en el Contexto Hispano (Fundamentals 

of Pastoral Care and Counseling in the 

Hispanic Context) 

Este curso es una introduccion al ministerio de 

consejeria y cuidado pastoral. Se enfatizara el 

pastor como consejero entre la poblacion hispana 

en los EE.UU. y en Latinoamerica, las necesidades 

especificas entre la poblacion hispana y las formas 

basicas de la consejeria pastoral. 

Taylor T 6-8:40 pm Fall 

NBTS M-495 
Theories of Counseling 

Class members will study, critique and experiment 
with the following four theories of counseling: 
client-centered, problem-solving, psychodynamic, 
and behavior modification. Classes will also in- 
clude: counseling exercises, case examples and 
discussions of the theological implications of the 
theories and their application for pastoral care. 
Tyson T 7-9:40 pm Fall 

NBTS M-597 
Group Counseling 

The purpose of this course is to give students a 
basic understanding of group therapy, the group 
process and group dynamics. The class will learn 
basic skills which will enhance their ability to work 
within the context of a group setting. 
Taylor M 2:30-5:10 Fall 

S-WTS 13-652S 

The Church's Ministry with and 

to Older Persons 

This class will meet two hours a week at the North 
Shore Senior Center with a group of older persons. 
The course will give an overview of aging in its 
social and religious context and will aim towards 
the development of attitudes and skills useful in 
shaping a ministry with and to older people. Vi 
unit. 
Carlson 



TBA 



Fall 



S-WTS 16-5 IIS 

Case Seminar in Field Education 

Students will present case material from their Field 
Education experiences to be discussed with the goal 
of discovering insights for ministry and theological 



understanding. A further goal of the seminar is 
that students will enhance their ability to use peer 
groups as a resource for continuing education in 
ministry. Vi unit. Limit: 9 (Fall), 12 (Spring). 
Carlson TBA Fall 

Carlson TBA Spring 

TEDS CE 574 
Family Life Education 

Study of marriage, the family, and the biblical role 
of family in the realm of education with emphasis 
on contemporary family life problems within the 
educational program of the church. 
Sell TBA Fall 

TEDS PC 621-622 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

Consideration of the dynamics of marriage and 

family relationships focusing on the counselor's 

role in premarital, marital, and family counseling 

through lectures, discussion, case studies and 

demonstrations. Prereq: Introduction to Pastoral 

Counseling. 

Carlson TBA Fall/Winter 



ILL LITURGY AND WORSHIP 
STUDIES 

BTS M-373 

Real Worship in the Real World 

A practical study of the language and theology of 
hymn texts, aiming to improve worship skills, make 
the most of hymnals, and explore Christian doc- 
trine in relation to contemporary issues. Hymn- 
text writing will be encouraged and evaluated. 
Wren 9/18-20, 23-24; 9-12, 1:30-5 FallPre-Term 

BTS M-374 

Worship, Patriarchy, Peace 

Worship will be studied in light of contemporary 
social justice issues, such as peace and nuclear war, 
sexism, massive suffering, and the images of God. 
Wren T 7-9:45 pm Fall 

BTS M-493 

Creative Prayer As Spiritual Discipline 

The knowledge and practice of the spiritual life. 
Disciplined time will be spent individually and cor- 
porately in hearing God speak through Scripture, 
meditation, and prayer as participants continue 
their spiritual pilgrimage. Each student will study a 
spiritual leader. Dyads will provide mutual direc- 
tion. Participation in a retreat is required. 
Fans W 2:30-5:15 Fall 



44 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



CTU T-450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical 
development of the eucharistic liturgy, with em- 
phasis on the eucharistic prayer. Theological reflec- 
tion on the meaning of eucharist in light of the 
above and of contemporary discussion. Considera- 
tion of current questions, e.g., ecumenical ques- 
tions of intercommunion and eucharistic ministry. 
Keifer MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Ostdiek MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU T-455 
Initiation 

Historical, theological and pastoral reflections on 
the experience and sacraments of Christian Initia- 
tion, with particular focus on the Rite of Christian 
Initiation of Adults as the norm for initiatory prac- 
tice. 

Hughes MW 10-11:15 Fall 

Keifer TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU T-554 

Great Books in Liturgy and Preaching 

A seminar on classical works which have shaped 
this generation of studies in liturgy and preaching. 
This seminar will meet seven times during the year, 
studying one book each session. 
Huels/ Staff M 7-9:30 pm Fall /Winter /Spring 

CTU T-562 
Music in Ritual 

This interdisciplinary seminar will examine music's 
function in human ritual, and more specifically in 
Christian ritual. Initial work in the behavioral and 
social sciences will prepare the groundwork for 
theological reflection on the role and meaning of 
music in today's worship. 
Foley W 2:30-5 Fall 

CTU M-435 
Religiosidad Popular 

"Adaptation of the liturgy to various native genius 
and tradition is not a novelty but fidelity to trad- 
tion." (Chupungco) Within the Hispanic communi- 
ty this native genius is expressed through 
religiosidad popular. This course is designed to 
reflect, critique, and foster an appreciation for 
Hispanic faith expression. Lab fee; Spanish 
reading track available. 
Perez TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

CTU M-521 

Liturgical Music: Principles and Performance 

A course designed to explore the role of music in 



liturgical celebration and the relationship between 
music and prayer. Those participating in the course 
will form the core choir for liturgical celebrations, 
thus allowing the group to experience and integrate 
the principles and repertoire in actual liturgical set- 
tings. 
Foley T 3:30-5 Fall /Winter /Spring 

CTSCM-317 

Music Program of the Church 

A general introduction to sacred music, designed 
especially for people without extensive musical 
background. Subjects covered include the history 
of choirs and choral music; organ design, purchase, 
and maintenance; hymnology; instruments in wor- 
ship; organ literature for worship, weddings, 
funerals; music staff dynamics; choral music for 
worship in the church today. 
Winfield TBA Fall 

G-ETS 31-615 

Christian Public Worship 

The importance of worship in the life and work of 
the minister and the congregation. Developing in- 
creasing competence in the understanding, 
theology, planning and leadership in worship. 
Limit: 24. 
Chatfield T 7-9:50 pm Fall 

LSTC M-380 

Worship (Teaching Parish) 

Introduction to liturgical theology and 
methodology; historical overview of Christian wor- 
ship; study of liturgical and hymnological materials 
in the Lutheran Church; the arts as worship and as 
servants to the liturgy. The course focuses on 
pastoral and presidential style in leadership, in- 
cluding communication skills, and on planning for 
worship. 

Bangert TTh 8:30-9:45 , F 1-1:50 Fall 

Rochelle MW 11-12:15, F 11-11:50 Fall 

SMLMS-211 

Music and Ministries of Worship 

An introductory course to liturgy through a study 
of the music and ministries of worship exploring: 
historical data, current issues of music for the 
assembly at worship and personal experiences of 
ministry. Student participation will include re- 
quired reading, classroom performance of music 
and theme papers. 

Wojcik MW 1:15-2:35 Fall 

Wojcik MW 2:40-4 Fall 



45 



Liturgy and Worship Studies 



Preaching and Communication 



SMLS-217 
Introduction to Liturgy 

Basic principles of liturgical theology: elementary 
examination of the interdisciplinary insights from 
ecclesial theology and human sciences which 
ground contemporary, pastoral practice in wor- 
ship. 
Broccolo W 1:15-4 Fall 

SML MS-370 
Vocal Practicum I 

Development of vocal potential as cantor, pro- 
claimer of the Word and presiding officer of the 
liturgy. Vocal training and experience. 
Wojcik MWF 8:25-9:20 Fall 

Wojak MWF 2:40-3:35 Winter 

Wojcik MWF 8:25-9:20 Spring 

S-WTS 09-504S 

History and Principles of Liturgical Worship 

A basic introduction to liturgical studies. The 
meaning of liturgical worship and its place in 
Christian life, its expression in the classical liturgies 
of the Early Church, Middle Ages, and Reforma- 
tion, and its renewal in the contemporary 
Liturgical Movement, with particular emphasis on 
the Eucharist. 
Mitchell TBA Fall 



preaching. Limited enrollment. Audio-visual fee. 
Staff Sem. ABCD: M 8:30-9:45 Fall/ 

Lab. A: M 2:30-4:30 Winter/ 

B.T1-3 Spring 

C: W 2:30-4:30 

D: Th 1-3 

G-ETS 31-501 

Developing and Preaching the Sermon 

The growth of the sermon from text and idea 
through presentation and evaluation. Delivery of 
sermons by each student in class. (This course of- 
fered five times during the year with a limit of 12 
for each section; check with the G-ETS Registrar 
each quarter to determine possible openings. May 
not be taken during a student's first year or its part- 
time equivalent.) 
Campbell or Chatfield TBA Fall /Winter /Spring 

LSTC M-540 

Language of Preaching: Shared Story 

A seminar to investigate the language form and 
theological implications of story. Readings will in- 
clude stories of the rabbis, modern short stories, 
and autobiographical stories. Students will com- 
pose and share stories dealing with selected ex- 
periences and theological themes. Prereq: Intern- 
ship. Limit: 12. 
Niedenthal TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 



IV. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

CTU M-449 

Communication Skills for Public Ministry 

In small group interaction and discussion, 
students examine the nature and dynamics of com- 
munication processes of 1) inter-personal com- 
munication, 2) public address, 3) oral interpreta- 
tion and performance of literature. Emphasis is on 
developing communication skills required in 
ministerial situations. Audio-visual fee. 
Staff MW 1-2:15 Fall 

Staff T 7-9:30 pm Winter 

CTU M-450 A,B,C,D 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

Students explore the principles and practices of 
liturgical preaching. The course includes: presenta- 
tion and development of communication theory 
and skills; appreciation of the hermeneutical task; 
the use of creative imagination; understanding how 
the ritual context shapes and informs the homily; 
and the development of a personal spirituality of 



LSTC M-542 
Preaching the Pericopes 

Careful investigation of methods of biblical inter- 
pretation basic for preaching texts from the three- 
year lectionary. Attention given to the particular 
series which begins in Advent following the term in 
which the course is offered. Students will engage in 
advance sermon preparation and, through class 
collaboration, produce a preaching portfolio for a 
portion of the church year. Prereq: LSTC M-340 
or equiv. 
Deppe MWF 9-9:50 Fall 

MTS M-315 

Introducing the Dynamics of Preaching 

This course helps the student integrate the 
disciplines of biblical exegesis, hermeneutics, the 
theology of preaching, the preacher's understan- 
ding of self and world, and oral interpretation. We 
prepare two sermons from exegesis to manuscript 
and deliver those sermons in lab settings. 
Wardlaw /Wilson MW 10-11:50 Fall 



46 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



MTS M-419H 

Del Texto al Sermon (From Text to Sermon) 

En este curso de exegesis con orientacion a la 
predicacion se examina el texto con miras a ayudar 
al estudiante en la preparacion de sermones para la 
congregacion hispana. 
Armenddriz MW 10-11:50 Fall 

NPTS Ml 24a 

Old Testament Preaching Lab 

This laboratory part of the course will be taken 
with B103, Faith of the Psalmist, from which 
resources will be drawn. 

Hedstrom W 8:30-9:45 Fall 

Wiens Th 2-3:15 Fall 

Stenberg Th 3:30-4:45 Fall 

NPTS M2 11 
Pastoral Preaching 

Middlers are prepared for internship and later 
ministry by developing a theology for the pastor's 
preaching task and by preparation and delivery of 
sermons for evangelism, teaching, and the funeral. 
Hjelm U7-10pm Fall 

NPTS M235 

Communication Theory and Skills 

The study and performance of basic experiences in 
communicating the Christian faith; speech 
preparation and delivery, oral reading, storytelling 
and interpersonal communication. 
B. Nelson MTh 3-5 Fall 

NBTS M-390 

Communicating in Pastoral Contexts 

This course is designed for junior students as a 
theological introduction to the study of pastoral 
ministry from the perspective of intercultural com- 
munication theory. It emphasizes public speaking 
as a tool for the communication of God's Word to 
God's People. 
TBA M 7-9:40 pm Fall 

NBTS M-390H 

Teologia y Metodologia de la Communicacion 

en Contextos Pastorales Hispanos 

(Theology and Methodology of Communication 

in Hispanic Pastoral Contexts) 

Introduccion a fundamentos biblico-teologicos, 

contextualizacion sociologica y presupuestos 

metadologicos para communicacion relevante - con 

enfasis en predicacion - en iglesias hispanos. Con- 

sideracion de los elementos homileticos en el orden 

cronologico en que el predicador los usa al preparar 



el sermon. Los estudiantes presentaran — no 
predicaran — sermones para evaluacion de la clase 
y profesor. 
Mottesi T 8-9:20 and 11-12:20 Fall 

S-WTS 11-602S 
Practice in Preaching 

Ten lectionary-based sermons designed for a parish 
liturgy will be presented by each student. Basic ex- 
egesis, theological integration, and presentation 
skills will be emphasized. Students will be en- 
couraged to experiment with different styles of 
preaching, and may expect individual supervision 
with the instructor as well as peer criticism. Limit: 



Edwards 



TBA 



Fall /Winter 



S-WTS 11-505S 

The Use of the Voice in the Conduct of 

Public Worship I 

A detailed working out of that portion of the 
Eucharist and office which is sung: the Sursum 
Corda, the proper Prefaces, Epistle and Gospel, 
collects and suffrages. Principles of oral interpreta- 
tion, public speaking, and chanting, especially as 
these relate to the liturgy o{ the Episcopal Church 
will be included. 
Petersen TBA Fall /Winter 



V. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

BTS M-492 

The Faith Community As Teacher 

An examination of the Christian education pro- 
gram of the local congregation from the point of 
view of the "community model." The basic contem- 
porary writings in the field will be assessed from the 
vantage point of the community model. 
Miller TTh 11-12:20 Fall 

CTU M-463 

Holistic Parish Education 

This course helps the minister design, plan and 
work with staff and volunteers in a total parish 
education program. Class sessions include adult 
catechesis, evangelization, sacramental prepara- 
tion, principles of cultural adaptation and educa- 
tion of the parish in prayer and social justice. 
Lucinio T 1-3:30 Fall 

Lucinio T 1-3:30 Spring 



47 



Educational Ministry 



CTSCM-321 

The Church's Teaching Ministry with Children 

Focus of this team-taught course is the church's 
teaching ministry from birth to age twelve. Theory 
and teaching techniques will be grounded in the 
early stages of human development. Church day 
care centers, the family unit, and the place o( the 
child in Church will be emphasized. 
W. Meyers /B. Meyers T 9:30- 12:20 Fall 



MTS M-414 

Nurturing a People: Baptism Through 

Confirmation 

This course will delineate ways that the church as 
the community of faith and parents can be partners 
in intentional planning for the growth in faith of all 
its children - from Baptism through Confirma- 
tion/Commissioning. 
Caldwell T 1-4 Fall 



G-ETS 33-502 

The Bible and Teaching 

The nature of the Bible and its use in Christian 
teaching; teaching methods for using the Bible in a 
variety of settings with children, youth and adults. 
Limit: 35; open to Levels I, II and III students. 
Furnish MW 3:30-5 Fall 

G-ETS 33-611 

Educational Ministry with Youth 

The design of practical strategies for the church's 
ministry with youth. Exploration of the range of 
resources for the creation of programs which 
respect the unfolding rhythms of young people's 
lives and the dynamics of family, school and socie- 
ty. Limit: 24. 
Simmons WF 9-10:50 Fall 

G-ETS 33-619 

Biography, Life Cycle and Theology 

A method of Christian education based on a varie- 
ty of approaches to biography and autobiography. 
The shaping of the person by society and church; 
development throughout the life cycle; theological 
reflection rooted in life experience. 
Simmons MW 5:30-7:20 pm Fall 

LSTC M-360A 

Educational Ministry: Christian Nurture 

Treatment of theological and psychological 
material related to Christian education, leading to 
the formation of principles which guide the prac- 
tice of educational ministry. Exercises both in the 
classroom and in the Teaching Parish setting. 
Conrad TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 

LSTC M-360B 

Educational Ministry: The Pastor as Teacher 

A seminar to explore the role of the pastor as 

teacher or theologian in residence in the parish, 

and the ways that education supports all functions 

of the congregation. An advanced alternative for 

M-360A. 

Bozeman TTh 8:30-9:45 Fall 



M/L M-459/UA-460 
Urban Academy Seminar: 
Community Organization 

(For course description, see UA-460, Ethical 

Studies III.) 

Schaper/ Simpson W 3-5 Fall 

NPTSMl31a 

Ministry of Christian Nurture 

The conceptual framework for the building of an 
effective teaching ministry in the local church is ex- 
amined: historical, biblical, developmental, educa- 
tional, and organizational. 
F. Anderson MTTh 8-9:15 Fall 

NPTS Ml 33 

Adult Ministries in the Church 

The course will deal with a study of recent findings 
in adult development and with the philosophy, 
principles and need for adult ministry in the 
church and community. Consideration will be 
given to special features of ministry with young 
adults, middle adults and older adults in the 
church. 
Banks 1 2/9-20, MTWThF Fall Post-Term 

NPTS M134 

Relational Youth Ministry 

The theological and psychological foundations of 

relational ministry with youth, needs of 

adolescents, issues in building relationships and 

specific programming ideas for local parish and 

para-church organizations are examined in this 

study. 

Downs T 2-5 Fall 

NPTS MHO 

Field Education Practicum I 

(Christian Education students) 

This experience includes the integration of theory 
and practice under supervision in ministry situa- 
tions in local churches. 
F. Anderson TBA Fall 



Educational Ministry 

NPTS M236 

Small Group Inductive Bible Study 

Participation in Bible study and group process is us- 
ed in this course to gain better understanding of 
equipping laity as Bible study leaders. Meets at 
Northbrook Evangelical Covenant Church, 
Northbrook, IL. 
F. Anderson Th 7:30-9:30 pm Fall 



Canon Law 

teaching ministry of the church utilizing five con- 
temporary approaches to Christian religious educa- 
tion. Students learn a basic instructional model 
and lead a peer group in a learning experience. 
Curricula resources of American Baptist 
Churches/USA and Christian Education: Shared 
Approaches are critiqued in learning centers. 
Jenkins /Morris T 7-9:40 pm Fall 



NPTS M274 
P.C. Write 

P.C. Write is a word processing program for MS- 
DOS computers. The program itself is inexpensive 
and yet able to produce and manipulate texts with 
relative ease. Students and faculty will be introduc- 
ed to the capabilities of P.C. Write to assist them in 
their various writing tasks. Intensive. 
Hallsten/Snodgrass 9/30-10/1, TBA Fall 



NBTS M-380 

Seminar in Human Development 

This is a basic course which focuses on the 
characteristics and interrelationships of 
developmental stages, including stages of moral 
and faith development. It also compares and criti- 
ques some of the major theories and explores ap- 
plications of Christian Education. 
Morris M 9:30-12:10 Fall 



NPTS M330 

Christian Education Lab School 

This experience is designed for the experiential 
development of basic teaching skills for various 
ages in the church. Co-sponsored with the Depart- 
ment of Christian Education of the Evangelical 
Covenant Church. Intensive. 
Lawson 10/11-10/13, TBA Fall 



TEDS CE 502 

Historical and Philosophical Foundations 

Survey and criticism of educational philosophies, 
especially those which have affected the church's 
ministry of education, and work toward the forma- 
tion of one's own philosophy of Christian educa- 
tion. 
Benson TBA Fall 



NBTS M-384 

Personal Growth Through Group Encounter 

In this course participants share in a laboratory 
group with a commitment to risk new personal and 
inter-personal behaviors. Human relations skills 
are developed by leadership of small groups. 
Historic and current utilization of the small group 
format by the Church for personal spiritual growth 
is examined. 
Jenkins 9/16-21 TBA FallPre-Term 

NBTS M-381 

Teaching Ministry of the Church 

This course is a basic course which introduces the 



VI. CANON LAW 
CTU M-421 
Church and Structure 

Introductory course in canon law, treating the 
nature and role of law in the Church, history of 
canon law, diocesan and supra-diocesan structures, 
Eastern rites, lay ministries, holy orders, clerical 
discipline, the teaching office of the Church, acts of 
worship other than sacraments, sacred places and 
times, and general norms. 

Huels TTh 10-11:15 Fall 

Huels TTh 10-11:15 Winter 



49 



\ 



Old Testament 

WINTER 1986 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 
GENERAL 

BTS B-418 

History of Christian Interpretation of 

Biblical Texts 

Texts important to Christian life and practice 
throughout the church's history will be examined 
in an attempt to discover how ethical-political and 
socio-religious matrices helped determine both the 
questions raised by Christians and the ways in 
which they expressed their questions, commit- 
ment, doubt, and trust. 
Meyer TTh 11-12:20 Winter 



OLD TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC B-310 

Pentateuch and Historical Books 

Introduction to the Pentateuch and Joshua to 
Kings. Emphasis on content, structure, message 
and theological significance. Survey of critical 
methods and the history of Israel through the 
United Monarchy. 

Fuerst TF 8:30-9:45 Winter 

Michel MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

LSTC B-619 

Old Testament Texts and Studies 

A directed reading course for graduate students in- 
cluding intensive study of Hebrew texts and discus- 
sion of pivotal secondary literature. 
Fuerst TBA Winter 

MTS B-312 

From David to Daniel: 

History, Literature, Theological Ferment 

A study of the Israelite and Jewish literature from II 
Samuel to I Maccabees, giving in-depth attention 
to representatives of each canonical division and 
literary category. Prereq: The course presupposes 
familiarity with critical method as acquired in 
MTS B-301 or its equivalent. 
Campbell TTh 10-11:50 Winter 

NPTS B120 

Old Testament Faith I 

The literature of the ancient Near East and the 
Jewish-Christian traditions provides the contexts 
in which we "listen" to the Hebrew Bible (Genesis 



through Judges). 

Holmgren MTThF 8-9:15 



Winter 



NBTS B-324 

Old Testament Literature 

This course is an introduction to the Old Testa- 
ment as literature. Attention is given to various 
methodologies used in interpreting the Old Testa- 
ment such as text-, form-, redaction- and literature- 
criticism. The various literary forms are studied as 
carriers of the ancient Hebrew faith and revelation. 
Bjornard WF 10:40-12 Winter 

S-WTS 01-502GS/G-ETS 11-502 
Old Testament Interpretation: Latter 
Prophets and Writings 

Introduction to the critical, historical, and 
theological study of the Hebrew Scriptures, with 
emphasis on the development of interpretive skills 
in the Latter Prophets (Isaiah-Malachi) and the 
Writings (Psalms-Chronicles); additional study in 
intertestamental writings (Apocrypha, Dead Sea 
Scrolls, Josephus, Philo). 
Garvey/TBA WF 9-10:50 Winter 

TEDS OT 624 

Old Testament Introduction 

The formation of the canon and history of ancient 
versions and of manuscript transmission with 
critical analysis of the documentary hypothesis of 
the Penteteuch, the theories of form criticism and 
issues concerning the origins of Isaiah, Daniel, 
Zechariah, and Psalms. 
Archer TBA Winter 



IL CANONICAL CORPUS 

BTS B-324 

Old Testament Exegesis: Genesis 

This course will use a study of Genesis to teach 
historical and literary exegetical methodology. The 
primary task will be to write an exegesis on a text in 
Genesis 12-50. Class discussion will focus on 
chapters 1-11. 
Roop WF 8-9:20 Winter 

BTS B-421 

Judges and 1 Samuel 

This course will have two foci. On the one hand we 
will look at various perspectives on the origin of 
Israel as a people in the land. The second focus will 
be on interpretation of selected texts in Judges and 
1 Samuel. 
Roop W 2:30-5:15 Winter 



50 



Old Testament 



CTU B-405 

Deuteronomistic History: Prophets and Priests 

A study of the Deuteronomistic Corpus which will 

focus on the role and functions of ancient Israel's 

official and charismatic leaders in order to probe 

the meaning of office and vocation in the life of the 

Church. 

Hoppe TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU B-420 
Psalms 

Select psalms will be studied from each literary or 
liturgical category for an analysis of their language, 
form and theology. Their lasting worth to Israel, to 
the New Testament Church and to us will be ex- 
plored. Helpful for students of liturgy and 
spirituality or for a review oi Old Testament 
Religion. 
Stuhlmueller W 7-9:30 pm Winter 

MTS B-437 
The Book of Job 

Study of the book of Job, examining its literary 
forms and their ancient cultural setting, and look- 
ing for its theological meaning in the present. 
Meets at First Presbyterian Church, Wilmette. 
Boling T 7-10 pm Winter 

TEDS ST 875 
Development of Canon 

A study of the growth and development of 
canonical consciousness in Judaism and early 
Christianity. Emphasis is placed on examination of 
the historical data, various possible historical 
reconstructions, and the implications for modern 
canonical studies. 
Dunbar TBA Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

BTS B-426 

Biblical Theology and Covenant 

Concentrating on the pentateuchal story and texts, 
we will examine the relation of a faith community's 
memory, story, and interpretation of life events to 
its commitment, understanding and identity. 

Meyer TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

CTU B-505 

Biblical Spirituality: Old Testament 

The religion of Israel is investigated, not only in its 
original setting but also according to its impact 
upon Christian life and ministry. Israelite tradi- 



tions and forms of worship, preaching and prayer 
will be seen for their continuity and authority to- 
day. 
Stuhlmueller M 7-9:30 pm Winter 

CTU B-506 

The Lord of All: Messianic Expectations 

The development of messianic expectations in an- 
cient Israel and early Judaism in the light of the 
royal traditions of the ancient Near East and of the 
Christian confession of Jesus as the Messiah. (M.A. 
Seminar; open to other interested students.) 
Hoppe T 7-9:30 pm Winter 

CTU B-529 

Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 

A close examination of the mystical substratum of 
Jewish historical and religious experience through 
an indepth study of the messianic movements in 
Judaism from the talmudic period up to and in- 
cluding the Sabbatai Sevi. This course will trace 
the stream of mystical thought and experience 
through the examination of pertinent historic texts 
and source material. 
Perelmuter 1/6-2/21, TTh 1-3:30 Winter 

CTSCH-310 

Ruth, Esther & Other Heroines 

The aim of this course is to read "unusual" books 
bearing the names of women: Ruth, Esther, Judith, 
Susanna, or glorifying women (Yael, Deborah, the 
Shulamite...). The old Israelite conception of 
womanhood is explored. An exploration also into 
the narrative genre; and into the intertestamental 
literature. 
LaCocque MW 2-3:20 Winter 

CTS CH-610B 

Pre-Christian Apocalyptic Literature 

This seminar especially geared towards doctoral 
students will explore the rich Apocalyptic 
literature found both in the Bible (O.T.) and in the 
"outside books". Special emphasis upon Daniel; I 
Enoch; II Baruch; and IV Esdras. Some aspects will 
be studied in depth. Considerable student involve- 
ment expected. Non-doctoral students need con- 
sent of instructor. 
LaCocque T 2-5 Winter 

LSTCB-513 
Psalms 

Survey of the major genres o{ the Psalter and their 
role in Israel's worship. Closer study of the in- 
dividual psalms and their major theological 



51 



Old Testament 



New Testament 



themes. Use of the Psalter in worship today. 
Michel MW 1-2:15 Winter 

MTSB-411 

Isael's Eighth-Century Prophets 

A study of Amos, Hosea, Isaiah and Micah against 
the backdrop of the second half of the eighth cen- 
tury, and of the redactional history of the books 
that bear their names. Students may use their 
Hebrew; others are welcome. 
Campbell MW 10-11:50 Winter 

NPTS B324 

Resources for Preaching and 

Teaching from the Old Testament 

The basis for faculty-student presentations will be 
texts selected from the Ecumenical Lectionary. 
Homiletical-devotional writings of Jewish and 
Christian leaders will be read and discussed. 
Prereq: B120 and B121. 
Holmgren M 7-10 pm Winter 



LSTC B-302 
Hebrew I 

In this course the students will become familiar 
with essential vocabulary used in Biblical Hebrew 
and gain a working knowledge of Hebrew gram- 
mar, thus acquiring a fundamental exegetical tool 
for the study of the Bible. 
Michel MWF 8-8:50 Winter 

NPTS Bl 00 
Elementary Hebrew 

Knowledge of basic biblical Hebrew is accomplish- 
ed through a survey of the grammar, translation of 
selected readings, and a study of the regular verb 
system. 
Holmgren MTWTh 1:30-2:30 Winter 

NPTS B103 
Intermediate Hebrew 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Holmgren TBA Winter 



NBTS B-523 

The Priesthood in Ancient Israel 

A seminar on the priesthood in Israel, studying 
both its relatedness to the cults of the Ancient 
Near East as well as its uniqueness. The struggle 
between priests and Levites is investigated. Atten- 
tion is given to the priestly contribution to faith in 
Israel. 
Bjornard MTh 1-2:20 Winter 



NBTSB-311aH 
Hebreo I (Hebrew I) 

Este curso es el primer trimestre de una secuencia 

de dos trimestres que intenta ensenar la gramatica 

y vocabulario hebreos, y desarrollar la habilidad de 

traduction para que el estudiantc pueda leer el 

hebreo biblico con la ayuda de herramientos de 

referencia. 

Horning MW 2:30-3:50 Winter 



S-WTS 01-60 IS 
Wisdom Literature: Job 

Following an overview of the genre and its types in 
the ancient Near East, the core of the course will 
involve a careful reading of the book of Job; the 
theological intentions which undergird the text 
will be examined and the implications for the early 
and contemporary audiences will be sampled. 
Garvey TBA Winter 



IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

G-ETS 11-641/2 
Elementary Hebrew I/II 

Introduction to the elements of biblical Hebrew 

(grammar and syntax) and translation of selected 

prose texts in the Hebrew Bible. 2 unit course, 

credit for 11-641 upon satisfactory completion of 

11-642. 

Mash MTTh 12-1:15 (I) Winter 

Nash MTTh 12-1:15 (U) Spring 



NBTS/BTSB-311b 
Hebrew II 

This course is the second of a two-quarter se- 
quence; see B- 3 1 1 a (Fall) for a description. 
Nasgowitz TWF 1-1:50 Winter 



NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B-305 

New Testament Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament will be 
presented in their historical, cultural, religious and 
sociological context. Introduction to the 
methodological tools employed in New Testament 
research and to the diverse theologies that com- 
prise the New Testament witness to Jesus of 
Nazareth. Especially designed for those beginning a 
program of theological study. 

Senior T 7-9:30 pm Winter 

Osiek MW 10-11:15 Spring 



52 



New Testament 



CTS CH-321 
Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the thought of the authors of the 
Gospels and the oral traditions which they used. 
An attempt will be made to discover which tradi- 
tions give evidence of the authentic historical 
ministry of Jesus. 
Scroggs MW 11-12:20 Winter 

G-ETS 12-501 

New Testament Interpretation: Gospels 

Theory and practice of exegesis in relation to 
selected passages, including textual, literary, form- 
and redaction-criticism and the use of programmed 
instruction. Exploration of the theology of the 
evangelists. Presentation of various viewpoints 
through team-taught lectures and exegetical sec- 
tions meeting in groups. 
Stegner/Roth TTh 9-10:50 (+ groups) Winter 

LSTC B-331 
Gospel Tradition 

A study of the content of the four gospels and the 
way each author structured and edited the tradi- 
tion so as to respond to specific needs of the 
church. Students will be introduced to the history 
of gospel study and given practice in the use of con- 
temporary critical methods. Prereq: Greek. 
Linss MWF 11-12:15 Winter 

Danker MW 11-12:15, F 11-11:50 Spring 

MTS B-302 
Jesus 

A study of the life and teachings of Jesus as 
represented in the Synoptic Gospels and various 
apocryphal and gnostic works. Attention will be 
given to the problem of the sources, the evangelists' 
theology, and the social and political context of 
Jesus' ministry. 
Welborn MW 6-8 pm Winter 

NBTS B-331 
Synoptic Gospels 

This course has two foci: the context, development 
and writing of the Synoptic Gospels, and their con- 
tent, the ministry of Jesus. The first half treats the 
Synoptic problem and the question of Jesus and the 
Gospels. The second half looks at the significant 
events and teachings of Jesus' ministry from the 
standpoint of source, form and redaction studies. 
Cosgrove WF 8-9:20 Winter 



SMLB-212 

Introduction to Biblical Studies II 

The course will deepen the student's understanding 
of the formation of the New Testament. The 
methods of exegesis will be explained and applied 
in examples, concluding with an overview of New 
Testament exegesis within the Catholic Church to- 
day, including discussion of more recent ap- 
proaches (e.g., structuralist, psychoanalytic, 
feminist, liberationalist). 

Lodge TFh 8:25-9:45 Winter 

Lodge TTh 9:55-11:15 Winter 

II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-434 

First and Second Corinthians 

Selections from the Corinthian correspondence in 
order to study the life and faith of Paul and the 
nature of the apostolic church, as such a study 
relates to the church o{ the twentieth century. 
Snyder WF 8-9:20 Winter 

CTU B-440 

The Gospel According to John 

The gospel will be studied according to its distinc- 
tive style and theology, its overall structure and 
content. Key sections will be used to highlight such 
major Johannine motifs as religious symbolism, 
sacraments, community and spirituality. 
Karris MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

Osiek TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU B-452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought o{ Paul in his cultural and 
theological setting. Study of such Pauline motifs as 
law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death and 
resurrection, Church and apostleship — and their 
import for the contemporary Church. 
Karris TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTSCH-521 

Galatians and Philippians 

An exegetical seminar of two key letters of Paul. 

Prereq: CH-321 or equivalent. 

Scroggs TTh 11-12:20 Winter 

LSTC B-544 

Exegesis of Selected Texts in Acts 

After a brief introduction to the book of Acts, we 
will select various texts such as narratives, reports, 
miracles, and speeches, and analyze them ex- 



53 



New Testament 



egetically. We will try to determine their Sitz im 
Leben, their historical implications, and their 
theological meaning. Prereq: Greek. 
Linss MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

LSTC B-474 
Preaching from Luke 

Study of Luke's compositional techniques and 
theological emphasis at the hand of selected 
pericopes, with special reference to contemporary 
proclamatory values. Beginning Greek required, 
though special arrangements can be made for 
students lacking it. 
F. Danker MW 11-12:15 Winter 

NPTS B145 

The Gospel of John 

An exegetical treatment of the fourth gospel in 
which its distinctive style and thought are analyz- 
ed. Attention will be given to the improvement of 
exegetical skills. Prereq: Greek. 
Snodgrass MTh 2-3:30 Winter 



CTU B-542 

The Social Study of the New Testament 

Study of the data and perspectives engendered by 
this recent approach, introduction to the ways in 
which sociology and cultural anthropology are us- 
ed in it, and assessment of the helpfulness of this 
approach to contemporary interpretation of the 
New Testament. 
Osiek W 2:30-5 Winter 

CTU B-550 

Violence and Peacemaking in 

New Testament Perspective 

In the light of our contemporary search for justice 
and peace, participants in this seminar will study in 
depth pertinent New Testament passages on 
violence, enemy love, nonretaliation and peace. 
The biblical material will be considered in the con- 
text of its own milieu and for its moral significance 
today. Prereq: New Testament Introduction. No 
audit permitted. 
Senior T 1-3:30 Winter 



NBTS B-432d 
Second Corinthians 

An exegetical analysis of 2 Corinthians with special 
attention to the Apostle's pastoral-epistolary 
method. Issues relating to the Corinthian cor- 
respondence as a whole will be taken up in the 
course of this study. 
Cosgrove MTh 1-2:20 Winter 

S-WTS 02-61 IS 

The Gospel According to Saint Mark 

Interpretation of the English Text of "The Earliest 

Gospel" in its historical context. Lecture and 

discussion. 

Pervo TBA Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B-472 

The Bible in Liberation Theology Since Puebla 

Beginning with Puebla's endorsement of liberation 
theology's claim that the God who revealed himself 
in the historical events of the Old Testament, and 
who incarnated himself in the poor man who is the 
historical event of the New, had a 'preferential, yet 
not exclusive, option for the poor,' we will remake 
theology through a critical rereading of both Scrip- 
ture and Tradition. 
Reynolds M 2:30-5 Winter 



G-ETS 12-603 

New Testament Theology: Christology 

An exegetical study of selected passages containing 
Christology titles, hymns, and statements, in- 
cluding a review of contemporary literature dealing 
with these texts as well as an investigation of the in- 
terplay of Jewish and Hellenistic influences found 
within them. Prereq: One foundational course in 
NT. 
Hansen Th 7-9:50 pm Winter 

LSTCB-451 

New Testament Era Archaeology 

An introduction to the methods, history, and 
results of archaeological excavation in Israel, the 
Eastern Mediterranean, and the Aegean basin. At- 
tention is given to pottery typology, excavation 
methods, and selected sites. Preparation for par- 
ticipation in the excavation of Caesarea Maritima 
in summer, 1986. 
Krentz TF 1-2:15 Winter 

NPTSB123 

Prophets After the Exile 

The struggle to reconstruct the nation of Israel in- 
volved the community in creative conflict. These 
conflicts are reflected in the work of the post-exilic 
prophets upon which this course will focus. 
Phelan T 2-5 Winter 



54 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



NPTS B340 

New Testament Theology 

Specific theological subjects are investigated in the 
teaching of Jesus and in the major New Testament 
writers. Attention will also be given to the ap- 
proaches of modern New Testament theologians. 
Snodgrass MTFh 8-9:15 Winter 

NBTS B-533 

Christology of the New Testament 

This course is an exegetical and historical attempt 
to identify and trace the forms and developments 
of Christological thinking in early Christianity, 
particularly in the New Testament, but with some 
attention to other early Christian literature. 
Scholer M 2:30-5:10 Winter 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

BTS/NBTS B-316b 
New Testament Greek II 

This course is the continuation and completion of 

B-316a New Testament Greek I. 

N. Holsey WF 1-2:20 Winter 

G-ETS 12-641/2 
Elementary Greek I/II 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

TBA TWThF 8-8:50 (11) Winter 

LSTC B-339 
Greek Readings 

Designed for those who have had an introductory 
Greek course, this course will continue the study of 
Greek grammar, based on the reading of selected 
parts of the Greek New Testament. Prereq: In- 
troductory Greek. 
F. Danker MWF 8-8:50 Winter 

MTS B-324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek, I, II 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Welborn Sec. 1: MTWTh 9-10 Winter 

Welbom Sec. 2: TF 2-4 Winter 



NPTS Bl 13 

New Testament Greek Readings 
(For course description, see Fall.) 
Snodgrass TBA 



S-WTS 02-52 1S/02-522S 
Elementary Greek I and II 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Pervo TBA 



Winter 



(11) Winter 



TEDS NT 803 

Advanced New Testament Greek Grammar 

History of the development of the Greek language 
from Homer to modern Greek and studies in Greek 
syntax and NT. exegesis with special reference to 
the standard grammars. Prereq: N.T. Greek Ex- 
egesis. 
Carson TBA Winter 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS H-437 

History of Christianity II 

An overview of the development of the Christian 
churches in the modern period. Topics include 
Protestant scholasticism and pietism, the 
evangelical revival, revolution and romanticism, 
the age of progress, the Roman Catholic reaction, 
Eastern Orthodoxy in the modern period, the 
ecumenical movement, and the churches and 
totalitarianism. 
Durnbaugh TFh 9:30-10:50 Winter 

CTU H-300 
Early Christianity 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Chirovsky MW 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTU H-307 
Christianization of Europe 

A study of the Church's encounter and interaction 
with the Barbarian nations, of their conversion, 
and of the development of Christian life. Major 
consideration will be given to: Medieval Missions; 
Charlemagne; the Papal Stages; the Schism be- 
tween East and West; and the development and ex- 
perience of a Christian European Culture. 
Bomtrager MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTS CH-344 

History of Christian Thought I 

From the early church to late medieval period. A 
survey of significant theological movements, with 
attention to their social context. A selected theme 
will provide focus. Theme for 1985-6: Redemption. 
To be followed in Spring by CH-345 History of 
Christian Thought II: from the reformation 
through the nineteenth century. 
Thistlethwaite MW 9:30-10:50 Winter 



55 



Historical Studies 



G-ETS 13-501 

History of Christianity I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Groh MTh 1:30-3:20 Winter 

G-ETS 13-502 

History of Christianity II 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Rogers MW 3:30-5 Winter 

LSTCH-310A 

Ancient and Medieval Church History 

Ancient and Medieval Church History can be 
studied either by the survey or the seminar 
method. This survey course will provide an over- 
view of historical developments, with some atten- 
tion also to the history of Christian thought 
(Historical Theology). The alternative, H-310B, 
will concentrate on selected topics in Historical 
Theology. 
Hendel TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

MTS H-3 19/320 

The Growth of the Christian Tradition: 

A History of Christian Doctrine 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



Rigdon 



TTh 10-11:50 



Winter 



NPTSH111 

The Christian Heritage II: The Modern Church 

A basic introduction to the history of the Christian 
church is continued in this study from the Refor- 
mation to the present. Special attention will focus 
on the institutional and theological diversity of the 
modern church in its cultural settings. 
P.Anderson MTTh 11:40-12:55 Winter 



background understanding of the Reformation era. 
Durnbaugh T 7-9:45 pm Winter 

CTU H-453 

Roman Catholic Identity: An Historical Overview 

The expression of the Christ-experience for Roman 
Catholics differs from that of the Protestant Chris- 
tians. An attempt to reflect on the Catholic ex- 
perience through such dimensions as mysticism 
and activism, spirituality and theology, culture 
adaptability and authentic humanism, celebration 
and suffering. 
Ross UW 3:30-4:45 Winter 

CTS CH-390A 

An Inquiry into Methodism: 

History and Doctrine 

A study of the history, theology, and polity of 
Methodism from Wesley to the present. Offered in 
two parts in alternate winter terms: A) History and 
Doctrine of Methodism; B) History and Polity. 
Blackwell Th 6:30-9:30 Winter 

G-ETS 13/21/34-672 

Spreading Scriptural Holiness: The 19th Century 

(United Methodist History/Doctrine/Polity B) 

Evangelistic thrust, social concern, institutional 
development, and theological shifts of the parent 
bodies of the United Methodist Church, from the 
formulation of organizational structures among 
Methodists, United Brethren and Evangelicals 
from 1815 onwards. Attention to the role of 
women, Blacks, Asians, Indians, to peace issues, to 
the Social Gospel and the fundamentalist con- 
troversy (1 unit). 
Stein/Cason TTh 3:30-5 Winter 



S-WTS 03-502S 

General Church History II: 

The Medieval Church 

A survey of the life and thought of the Christian 
church from Gregory the Great to the renaissance. 
McPherson TBA Winter 



II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

BTS H-440 

The Radical Reformation 

A seminar on the "left wing" of the Reformation, 
with readings in representative literature from 
Anabaptism, Spiritualism, and Evangelical Ra- 
tionalism. Participants are assumed to have general 



MTS H-486H 

Desarrollo del Protesantismo Hispano en los 
Estados Unidos (The Development of Hispanic 
Protestantism in the United States) 

El curso proporciona al estudiante conocimiento y 
apreciacion de la historia y desarrollo del 
ministerio protestante entre los hispanos en los 
Estados Unidos. Se estudian tipos de ministerio y 
las actitudes y valores propios de los mismos. Meets 
at El Centre 
Armenddriz W 6:30-9:30 pm Winter 

NPTS H300 

Covenant History and Theology 

This course examines the history and theology o( 
the Evangelical Covenant Church, rooted in the 
Lutheran reformation and pietistic heritage. The 



56 



Historical Studies 



church development in Sweden and America is 

studied in terms of its identity and mission. 

G. Anderson MTTh 8-9:15 Winter 

NBTS C-444 
Denominational Heritage 

This course is intended to meet the requirements of 
denominational heritage for non-Baptists. 
Readings and assignments will be individually 
tailored for each student. Class sessions will vary 
according to the configuration of the class but will 
include individual sessions with the instructor, 
small group meetings and some full class sessions. 
Dayton M 9:30-12:10 Winter 

NBTS C-447 
Baptist Thought 

This course is an examination and evaluation of 
characteristic Baptist emphases in theology, polity 
and practice in order to enable Baptist leaders to 
function more effectively in the context of ministry 
today. Student study, analysis and evaluation of 
selected issues constitute a vital part of the course. 
Prereq: C-342 or C-442. 
Ohlmann TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

SMLH-212 
Patrology II 

The growth and development of Christianity was 
marked in a unique manner by the theological, 
pastoral, and spiritual concerns that were address- 
ed by the Fathers of the Golden Age o( Christian 
Antiquity in the East and in the West. 
Cunningham MWF 9:25-10:20 Winter 



of salvation will shed light on both his refutation of 
gnosticism and his theological development of 
crucial Christian doctrines. 

Chirovsky MW 1-2:15 Winter 

G-ETS 13-606 

History of Christian Thought 

A study of the development of Christian thought, 
either in relation to a doctrinal issue or to a period 
in church history. (A) Schleiermacher to Barth; (B) 
Edwards to Rauschenbusch. 

Rogers TTh 9-10:50 (A) Winter 

Rogers TTh 3:30-5 (B) Spring 

G-ETS 13-608 

Seminar: Life and Work of Martin Luther 

An introduction to Luther's life and theological 
contribution through a study of his sermons, 
treatises, and letters. 
Stein WF 9-10:50 Winter 

LSTCH-512 

Luther and Social Reform 

A seminar which will focus on the theological and 
practical aspects of Luther's social thought. 
Readings and discussions of primary sources deal- 
ing with such issues as the care of the poor, educa- 
tion, authority, marriage, and war. 
Hendel MW 11-12:15 Winter 

MTS H-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

A systematic study o{ Calvin's theology as seen 
primarily in the Institutes of the Christian Religion. 
Rigdon T 1-4 Winter 



III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUAL 

BTS H-456 

Luther, Calvin, Wesley 

The works of these three men will offer an oppor- 
tunity to compare major types of Protestant 
theology. At the same time, the unifying strands 
will constitute an intensive introduction to the 
main motifs of Classical Protestantism. 
Brown TTh 11-12:20 Winter 

CTU H-410 
Irenaeus of Lyons 

This introduction to the "father of Christian 
theology" will begin with Ireanaeus' polemical con- 
text, theological method, and use and interpreta- 
tion of the Scriptures. The study of his major 
themes of revelation, tradition, unity, incarnation 
and redemption, recapitulation, and the economy 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

CTS CH-380 

History of Religion in American Society 

An introduction to the historical study of 
American religion, with emphasis on these topics: 
the churches' visions of a "Christian America" from 
the Puritans to the present; civil religion and the 
rituals and myths of public life; the religious bases 
of some reform movements. Attention to dissen- 
ting voices. 
Bass T 6:30-9:30 pm Winter 

LSTC H-350A 
American Church History 

The development of religious ideas, movements, 
and institutions in America from colonial times to 



57 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



the present. The course surveys the total religious 
milieu, including the rise of new religious 
movements. 

Scherer MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

NPTS H350 

The Church and American Society 

In tracing the development of the church in the 
American scene, among the many themes handled 
are these: European background, Puritanism, The 
Great Awakening, religious freedom, revivalism 
and social reform, denominationalism, 
Americanism and civil religion, theological con- 
troversies, the Ecumenical movement. 
G. Anderson MTTh 10:15-11:30 Winter 



tween the Revolution and the Civil War. Special 
consideration is given to theology in New England, 
the revival movement, and the growth of social and 
theological liberalism. 
Schafer MW 2-3:50 Winter 

NPTS H2 10 

Church History Survey 

In this introductory survey of the Christian church 
from its inception to the present, selection of 
historical periods and themes will be examined 
with an emphasis on the theological and institu- 
tional development in the context of specific per- 
sons and movements. 
P.Anderson MTTh 10:15-11:30 Winter 



V. SELECT TOPICS IN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

G-ETS 13/22-621 

Church, Family and Gender Roles in 

Christianity 

Outline of the shifting relations between Church 
and family and gender roles of women and men in 
Western Christianity from the New Testament 
period to the present. Formulation of a historical 
perspective; theological and ethical reflection on 
the relationship between feminism, faith and fami- 
ly today. 
Keller /Ruether Th 7-9:50 pm Winter 

G-ETS 13/32-627 

The Stranger at One's Gate, The Alien in 

One's Midst 

An examination from historical and psychological 

perspective of selected Christian women and men 

resisting, changing, and assimilating to societal role 

expectations. 

Groh/Justes TTh 3:30-5 Winter 

G-ETS 13-645 

Black Ministry: Confronting Historical 

Challenges 

Full examination of central issues faced by black 
clergy as they have sought through the centuries to 
develop viable ecclesiastical structures and to pur- 
sue effectively the ministry and mission of the 
church. 
Murphy M 1:30-4:20 Winter 

MTS H-441 

Theology in America from Edwards to 

Bushnell 

Main currents in American religious thought be- 



S-WTS 03-607S 
Caroline Divines 

A seminar study of theological and pastoral con- 
cerns of Puritans, "Arminians", and the early 
Latitude-Men in the Church of England from 1600 
to 1685. Permission of instructor required. Limit: 
16. 
Haugaard TBA Winter 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

L INTRODUCTORY AND 

FOUNDATIONAL 

CTU T-325 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and 
methods of theology worked out from a study of 
several case-histories. Special emphasis on the 
historical revelation in Christianity and the 
developing awareness of the faith-community in 
relation to shifting horizons. 
TBA UW 10-11:15 Winter 

G-ETS 21-502 
Systematic Theology II 

Christian understanding of Jesus the Christ, Salva- 
tion, the Holy Spirit, Church, Ministry, and 
Sacraments. Prereq: 21-501. 
Young TTh 9-10:50 Winter 

LSTCT-312 
Christian Theology II 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence, see Christian Theology I. The second 
course in the sequence deals with the human con- 
dition (including sin and evil) and the Person and 



58 



Theological Studies 



Work of Christ. 






Braaten 


MWF 11-11:50 


Winter 


Hefner 


TTh 11-12:15 


Winter 



LSTC T-301 

Christian Identity Today 

An introduction to theology as a confessional and 
constructive task. It introduces students to 
theological method and to hermeneutical options 
as they interpret classic Christian texts, especially 
the ecumenical creeds and the Augsburg Confes- 
sion, focusing on the question of how this tradition 
may be appropriated today. 

Bertram TF 8:30-9:45 Winter 

Braaten MWF 9-9:50 Winter 

MTS T-301 

Introduction to Systematic Theology 

Issues include: faith in God, religious experience, 
revelation and symbols of faith in relation to basic 
Christian doctrines. Provides overview of the loci 
of theology and major options for interpretation. 
Students encouraged to begin formulating their 
own theological perspective in conversation with 
the Reformed tradition. Recommended for all first 
year students. 
Parker MW 2-3:50 Winter 

NPTS Tl32a 
Systematic Theology II 

Jesus Christ is the foundation of the church, the 
center of its faith and proclamation. "Who this is" 
that communicates himself by Word and sacra- 
ment is the focus of reflection. 
Weborg MTTh 11:40-12:55 Winter 

NBTS C-354 

Christian Theology II: An Eschatological 

Approach 

This course is an introduction to the basic issues of 
systematic theology which begins from the early 
Christian proclamation of the life, death, resurrec- 
tion, exaltation and expected return of Jesus, and 
the lifestyle which it generated. The course ex- 
plores eschatology, revelation and the work of Jesus 
Christ. 
Finger TTh 11-12:20 Winter 

S-WTS 05-50 IS 

Approaches to the Study of Religion and 

Theology 

Especially concerned with the presuppositions and 
methods of theological inquiry, the course deals 
with ways of talking responsibly about God, Jesus 



Christ, and Christian living. The philosophical 

and ecumenical contexts for doing theology are 

considered. 

Stevenson TBA Winter 

S-WTS 05-602S 

Work of the Holy Spirit 

Emphasizing sacramental theology, the course also 
deals with creation-providence, eschatology, and 
workings of the Spirit. 
Crum TBA Winter 

S-WTS 05-6 12S 
Fundamental Theology I 

Anthropology (sin, grace, faith) and Christology 
(incarnation, atonement): A constructive, rather 
than historical, approach which examines these 
fundamental Christian doctrines within the con- 
text of modern and contemporary philosophy, 
history of religion sociology, etc. A guiding ques- 
tion will be: "What is available to Christian faith 
(thought, preaching, practice) today?" Middler 
standing or permission of the instructor required. 
Limit: 30. 
Stevenson TBA Winter 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

CTU T-520 

Theology of Karl Rahner 

A study of the philosophical orientation of Rahner 
and its implications in his theological writings. 
Hayes MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

CTS TEC-519/LSTC T-634 
Hegel and Whitehead 

A seminar exploring commonalities and contrasts 
in the metaphysical systems o{ G. W. F. Hegel and 
Alfred North Whitehead, with attention to their 
usefulness for constructive theology. 
Hefner /Schroeder W 2-5 Winter 

LSTC T-469 

Toward a Black Spirituality 

An attempt to achieve a basic understanding of 
black spirituality. Howard Thurman will be taken 
as the chief model, with attention given also to 
other perspectives such as that of African Chris- 
tianity. 
Pero MW 1-2:15 Winter 



59 



Theological Studies 



M/L TS-438 
Process Theology 

An intermediate-level seminar stressing careful 
reading and analysis of representative process 
philosophers and theologians, such as Whitehead, 
Wieman, Hartshorne, Meland and Cobb. Key 
philosophical concepts will be reviewed, but some 
prior reading of Whitehead will be presupposed. 
Reeves TBA Winter 

NPTST221 

Theology and Ethics of Bonhoeffer 

An overview of Dietrich Bonhoeffer's life, 
theology, and ethics forms the structure of the 
seminar and is the focus of this study. It offers a 
prime example of theology and biography. 
Nekon Th7-10pm Winter 

NBTS C-552a 

Theologies of Pannenberg & Moltmann 

The major works of these two contemporary 
theologians will be read and discussed in seminar 
style. The course will carefully compare and con- 
trast their views on such topics as Eschatology, 
Ethics, the Church, Christology and History. The 
significance of both theologians in relation to other 
contemporary theologies and current issues will be 
explored. 
Finger T 7-9:40 pm Winter 

NBTS C-454a 

Believers' Church Theologies 

Basic theological works from at least three of the 
following Believers' Church movements will be 
read and discussed in seminar style: Anabaptist, 
Baptist, Quaker, Pietist, Methodist. The course's 
basic purpose is to consider what relevance these 
movements might have for the doctrines discussed 
in Systematic Theology and for the discipline as a 
whole. 
Finger W 2:30-5:10 Winter 



CTU T-430 

The Problem of God in Contemporary Society 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Phelps MW 11 :30- 12:45 Winter 

CTU T-440 A&B 
Christology 

A critical review of Scriptural and traditional inter- 
pretations of Incarnation and Salvation in an effort 
to arrive at an articulation of what Jesus Christ and 
redemption mean for contemporary people. 
Hayes Sec. A: MW 1041:15 Winter 

Phelps Sec. B: TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU T-445 

Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the relation 
of the Kingdom to the Church; the basic images 
and themes in Scripture and tradition; the develop- 
ment of ecclesiastical office; and the relation of the 
Church to the world, especially in relation to the 
socio-political situation of "Third World" countries. 
Linnan M 7-9:30 pm Winter 

CTS TEC-485 

Theology of Peacemaking 

Approaches to the theological task in a nuclear 
age. Doctrines of God, Creation, human nature 
and eschatology are particular theological foci. 
Consideration of the U.C.C. as a "Peace Church." 
Thistlethwaite MW 11-12:20 Winter 

CTS TEC-491 

Women & Religion: The Literary Imagination 

Imaginative literature holds major resources for 
reflection upon the spiritual experiences and 
theological insights of women. This course will 
focus on some excellent examples of such fiction 
and poetry, including that of Emily Dickinson, 
Virginia Woolf, and Alice Walker, with some at- 
tention to related literary criticism and theology. 
Bass Th 9:30-12:20 Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 
BTS T-550 
Systematic Theology 

Following an examination of the doctrine of revela- 
tion and questions of theological epistemology, the 
course deals with selected theological topics. The 
student is afforded the opportunity to formulate a 
doctrinal position and to test the statement against 
the Bible and church tradition, in dialog with 
other class participants. 
Brown/Groff TTh 9:30-10:50 Winter 



CTS TEC-561 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

A seminar designed to assist the advanced student 
in the task of pastoral diagnostics. A phenomenol- 
ogical examination of psychopathology will be the 
occasion for theological reflection on the nature 
and dynamics of alienation, sin, and evil as 
manifest in human personality. 
Moore W 9:30-12:20 Winter 



60 



Theological Studies 



LSTC T-457 

Lutheran Ecumenical Relations 

The purpose of the seminar is to equip graduates 
for effective ecumenical involvement at parish, 
regional, and international levels, attending to 
theological and pastoral issues in Lutheran 
dialogues with Roman Catholic, Orthodox, 
Episcopal, and Reformed churches. 
Tobias TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

LSTC T-462 

Ecclesiology in a Multcultural Context 

An examination of the meaning of the church and 
its mission in our time, including a study of the 
doctrine of the church in Scripture and in the 
Lutheran Confessions, and an examination of this 
theme in contemporary theological scholarship, 
with special reference to the ecumenical movement 
and to liberation theology. 
Pero TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

LSTC T-545 

Ministerial Identity and Apostolic Continuity 

Research and discussion on the contemporary pro- 
blem of ministerial identity, the meaning of ordina- 
tion, the relation of "Ministry of Word and Sacra- 
ment" and "Historic Episcopacy" to apostolic con- 
tinuity. Includes study in Lutheran bilateral 
dialogues with Romart Catholic, Orthodox, and 
Reformed churches. Prereq: LSTC T-31 1-313 or 
equiv. 
Tobias W7-10pm Winter 

NPTS T130 

Source Studies in Pietism 

Pietism concerned itself with the rebirth of persons 
and the renewal of congregations. The contribu- 
tions of Arndt, Spener, Francke, Bengel, Zinzen- 
dorf and Rosenius to that end will be studied. 
Weborg Th 2-5 Winter 

NPTSTHla 

Contemporary Theological Issues 

Several crucial current theological perspectives 
(e.g., evangelical, black, feminist, and third world 
are examples) and several intersecting themes, as 
well as variations, are identified in this course. 
Nelson/Johnston MTTh 10:15-11:30 Winter 

S-WTS 15-502S 
Theological Bibliography 

A systematic examination of bibliographies in 
biblical studies. Church history, liturgies, and 
pastoral ministry. Attention will be given to 



classification and subject headings in theological 

libraries. Vi unit. 

Smith TBA Winter 

SCJ T-473 

Encountering the Holocaust: 

The Crucifixion of the Jews 

The Holocaust-event poses enormous problems for 
Jews and for Christians, and for Jews in relation to 
Christians. As a paradigmatic product of moderni- 
ty the Holocaust-event is frighteningly pertinent to 
contemporary human existence, forcing one to 
confront ultimate questions regarding faith, 
human nature, moral values and human existence. 
These questions, problems and challenges will be 
examined through an encounter with the historical 
facts, the human testimony, and the implications 
- theological, moral, political, social, legal and 
psychological - of the Holocaust event. Meeting 
place TBA. 
Sherwin T 7-9:30 pm Winter 



IV. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU T-493 

The Experience of God in Teresa of Avila 

and John of the Cross 

A study of the mysticism of the Spanish 
Carmelites, Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross. 
After an overview of the cultural and spiritual con- 
text and the body of their writings, their respective 
understanding of the nature and stages of mystical 
experience will be analyzed and compared. 
Lozano TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTUM-416 
Discernment of Spirits 

An overview of the history of the theology of 
discernment. Criteria to discern true prophets and 
teachers in the Bible. A synthesis of the main 
criteria for discernment found in the Church's 
tradition and applied to discerning God's will 
through the movements of the Spirit and discern- 
ing the authenticity of spiritual experiences. 
Lozano TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTS TEC-417 
Testimonies of the Spirit 

A careful reading of certain major spiritual 
autobiographies such as Augustine's Confessions, 
Pascal's Pensees, Tolstoy's My Confession, 
Woolman's Journal and Hammarskjold's Markings 




61 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



for theological insight and the illumination of 

Christian existence. 

LeFevre T 9:30-12:20 Winter 

G-ETS 33-627 
Spirituality and Education 

A reflective study of skills and resources needed to 
enable spiritual growth in a variety of educational 
settings. Explores major areas of spirituality such as 
theologies of the spiritual life, prayer styles, 
asceticism, spiritual direction, and retreats. Prereq: 
1 foundational. 
Simmons MTh 1:30-3:20 Winter 

LSTC T-469 

Toward a Black Spirituality 

(For course description, see listing in Theological 

Studies II.) 

Pero MW 1-2:15 Winter 



ment of a self-conscious methodology. 
Tholin WF 9-10:50 

Will MW 3:30-5 

LSTCE-310 
Christian Ethics 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Bloomquist MW 2:30-3:45 



Winter 
Spring 



Wu 



MTSE-313 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

This is an elementary course in Christian ethics. It 
seeks to familiarize the student with the vocabulary 
and analytical instruments of differentiation and 
clarification used in philosophical and theological 
ethics. It also seeks to familiarize the student with 
some of the substantive issues which concern 
Christian ethicists. 
Garcia T 1-4 Winter 



SML M-356 

Spiritual Direction — I 

An understanding of the theory and practice of 
spiritual direction emerges only through a study of 
history, an understanding of movement in spiritual 
life, and a dialog with contemporary psychological 
theory and practice. Limit: 8. 
Cameli TTh TBA Winter 



ETHICAL STUDIES 
I. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E-379 

Christian Ethics: The Moral Agent 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



Nai 



MW 2:30-3:45 



Wini 



CTS TEC-439 
Economics and Morality 

Examination of the moral bases of alternative 
economic systems. Readings will be drawn from 
representative theorists emphasizing the merits of 
relatively free market capitalism, social market 
capitalism, and socialism. Both economists and 
Christian social ethicists will be included in the 
discussion. 
Schroeder M 2-5 Winter 

G-ETS 21/22-503 
Theological Ethics 

The formulation and implementation of ethical 
norms derived from faith commitments, based on 
the study of theory and practice (cases); develop- 



S-WTS 08-602S 
Anglican Ethics 

Anglican thinkers will be studied in order to 
evaluate understandings of and resources for the 
moral life in Anglican tradition. Particular atten- 
tion has been given to Kenneth Kirk and the tradi- 
tion of Anglican moral theology and Anglican 
Christian socialism from F.D. Maurice through 
William Temple. Limit: 15. 
Sedgwick TBA Winter 

IL SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

BTS E-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 



Fates 



T 3:10-4:40 



Winter 



CTU E-375 

Theological Foundations of Social Ethics 

An exploration of the theological sources which 
have informed, and the theological grounds which 
serve to justify, a variety of perspectives on social 
justice. Attention will be given to foundational 
texts in the Roman Catholic and Protestant tradi- 
tions, and to the ways in which these texts in- 
fluence contemporary writing in social ethics. 
Wadell MW 8:30-9:45 Winter 

CTU E-488 

Marxist Humanism and Christian Faith 

The course will study the problems of the ac- 
culturation of the Christian faith within the marx- 
ist culture and political context. The course will 



62 



Ethical Studies 



study key concepts and fundamental socio-political 
structures of marxism, in view of disclosing their 
eventual capacity to become cultural expression of 
Christian faith and praxis. 
Fornasari MW 1041:15 Winter 

CTU E-541 

World Poverty, Development, Liberation 

An investigation and assessment of the division of 
the world into rich and poor countries. Poverty, 
development and liberation will be studied as 
socio-political phenomena. The responsibility of 
Christian individuals and communities with regard 
to this situation will provide the focus for the 
course. 
Fornasari MW 2:30-3:45 Winter 

CTU E-570 

Revolution and Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 

An examination of various definitions of revolu- 
tion as they have emerged in the classical Western 
revolutions. An extended look at current revolu- 
tionary theology as it has emerged from Latin 
American sources. 
Pawlikowski MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU M-429 

Psychologial Aspects of Liberation and Justice 

This course explores psychological aspects of 
selected themes in liberation and social justice: e.g., 
alienation, work, revolution, prejudice, liberation. 
Prerequisites are introductory social justice and 
some knowledge of liberation theology. 
Szura TTh 11:30-12:45 Winter 

CTS TEC-452 

Church and Community Studies: The City 

This seminar-laboratory will build on the historic 
tradition of H. Paul Douglass, Samuel C. Kin- 
cheloe and others, focusing on the application of 
sociological methods to study the church in the 
changing city. Available demographic data will be 
supplemented by empirical investigations to 
develop sociological understandings of the city 
parish. 
Fukuyama T 2-5 Winter 

G-ETS 22-502 

The Church and Social Systems 

Outline of the stances taken by churches toward 
society in different contexts. Various types of social 
systems, such as patriarchy, racism, liberal 
democracy, socialism, economic neo-colonialism 
and militarism. Formulation of ethical principles 
for Christian relations to these social systems and 



models of ministry. 

Ruether T 6-8:50 pm 



Wintei 



LSTC M-476 

From Farm to Table - But Not All Tables 

A study of the church's mission and ministry in 
relation to the agriculture economy. The course 
will consider the various aspects of agricultural pro- 
duction and marketing from the viewpoints of the 
farmer, economist, retailer, manufacturer, and con- 
sumer, with special reference to the problem of 
world hunger. 
Niedenthal T 2:30-5 Winter 

M/L E-397 

Democratic Philosophies and 

Liberation Theology 

A critical assessment of the capacities of democratic 
philosophy and liberation theology to address the 
social decisions required by the 21st century. 
Engel TBA Winter 

SMLM-319M-5 
Business Ethics 

The principles and values which flourish in the 
world of business (pursuing their own self-interest) 
are formed in references to success in business. This 
course will study the world of business and its prac- 
tices in light of Christian values and principles. 
Boyle MW 1:15-2:35 Winter 

UA-461 

Urban Academy Seminar: 
Politics of Compassion 

Orientation to electoral campaigns, government, 
lobbying on city, state, and national issues and 
issue-based campaigns via direct observation and 
meeting with political and religious leaders from 
Chicago. Also includes: introduction to political, 
liberation and practical theologies, the politics of 
compassion, and an analysis of effective grass-rocts 
church projects of social-political action. Meets at 
ICUIS. 
Simpson W 3-5 Winter 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

BTS E-565 

The Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A seminar study of the writings of Paul Tillich, 
especially the Systematic Theology, in order to 
discover his method and the fundamental concepts 
of his thought and to assess the applicability of his 



63 



Ethical Studies 



World Mission Studies 



ideas to contemporary issues. 
Miller TTh 8-9:20 



Winter 



CTU E-537 

Ethics and the Emotions 

One presupposition of ethics is that it deals with ra- 
tional people acting rationally in situations after 
ample reflection. This course asks whether the 
above presupposition is in fact valid. In doing so, it 
will investigate both moral theories and 
psychological theories, especially those dealing 
with emotions and the unconscious. 
McCarthy /Nairn T 1-3:30 Winter 

CTU E-580 

Theology and Ethics of Marriage 

Begins with the development o{ Christian an- 
thropology of human love, followed by a considera- 
tion of some traditional church teaching on the 
theology of marriage involving such issues as fideli- 
ty, indissolubility, contract/covenant, etc. Some 
contemporary concerns will then be treated: mar- 
riage preparation, on-going support for the family 
unity, separation and divorce, responsible parent- 
hood, sterilization, etc. 
Diesbourg T 3:30-4:45 Winter 

G-ETS 22-601 

The Ministry of the Laity 

Biblical, theological, and historical understandings 
of the ministry of the laity and dialogue with laity 
and ordained clergy representing churches engaged 
in creative ministry and sharing of authority 
among clergy and laypersons. 
Keller WF 9-10:50 Winter 

G-ETS 22-611 

Christian Ethics of Martin Luther King, Jr., 

and Reinhold Niebuhr 

Ethical systems compared, analysis of conceptual 
methodological frameworks, strategies of social 
change, philosophies of non-violence, relation of 
Christian realism to image of God, sin, per- 
sonhood, power, social justice, love, eschatology, 
Kingdom of God and the Beloved Community. 
Young T 7-9:50 Winter 

G-ETS 22-614 

Black Women and a Constructive Ethic 

A literary, sociological and historical analysis of 
the methods and experience of oppression used by 
contemporary black women writers to shape an 
authentic liberation ethic that goes beyond tradi- 
tional ethical systems and the implications for 



ministry within the Black Church and the Church 

universal. 

Townes MW 5:30-7:20 pm Winter 

LSTC E-438 

Theology and Politics in Southern Africa 

An examination of the extent to which different 
world views — political, social, cultural, and 
economic — condition and color theological reflec- 
tion, as seen in the ways in which different 
theological standpoints in the churches in 
Southern Africa are correlative with differences in 
approaches to and interpretations of sociopolitical 
conditions. 
Maimela TTh 2:30-3:45 Winter 

LSTC E-535 

Issues in Feminist Ethics 

A seminar which will deal with issues of sexuality, 
violence against women, and work and family as 
discussed by contemporary feminist ethicists. 
Prereq: a basic course in Christian Ethics. 
Bloomquist TF 1-2:15 Winter 

SMLM-318M-3 
Christian Marriage 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Boyle MW 2:40-4 Winter 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

CTU W-419 

Towards a Missionary Spirituality 

An exploration intended to encourage holistic 
spirituality, the course addresses specific problems 
and challenges familiar to missionaries, with a view 
to growth in and from the existential situation. Ac- 
cepting that marginality, uprootedness and isola- 
tion are implications of the call to mission, we work 
towards a relevant and sustaining spirituality. 
Gittins TTh 10-11:15 Winter 

CTU W-497 

Mission Integration Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Barbour /Rabbiosi M 7-9:30 pm Fall/Winter 

CTU W-548 

Witchcraft in Traditional Societies 

Witchcraft is a social fact in many cultures, yet it 
has been little understood, or dismissed, by mis- 
sionaries. As a personalistic explanation of misfor- 
tune, it is intimately woven into the social fabric. 
An attempt is made to contextualize witchcraft, 



64 



World Mission Studies 



Ministry Studies 



looking for Gospel values, possible approaches, and 

concerned understanding. 

Gittins MW 1-2:15 Winter 

CTU W-592 

Lakota Belief, Ritual and Spirituality 

This seminar will explore: some aspects of the 
belief, ritual and spirituality of the traditional 
religion of the Lakota Indians of the Rosebud 
Reservation (South Dakota); the effects of past and 
contemporary western technological society and 
values of the Lakota; the encounter of Christianity 
and Lakota traditional religion and the contextual 
local theologies, which arise from this encounter. 
Barbour W 7-9:30 pm Winter 

G-ETS 13/22-670 

20th Century World Mission 

Inter-disciplinary course including History, Ethics, 
and Christian Education. The challenge of con- 
temporary world mission to the local church, in- 
cluding recent changes, theological issues, 
denominational structures, and resources for inter- 
pretation. Case studies, media interpretation and 
resource persons demonstrate the vitality and 
variety of present practices and the ways these can 
relate to a parish situation. 
Cason M 1:30-4:20 Winter 

LSTC W-427 

Christian Faith and the New Religions 

The course seeks to comprehend the attractiveness 
of some "new religions" and Eastern cults which 
challenge Christian churches on their home 
ground. Selected new religions will be studied from 
various perspectives, and issues raised for Christian 
faith and pastoral leadership, especially among 
youth, will be examined. 
Scherer TF 1-2:15 Winter 

NPTSM151 

Cultural Dimensions in Mission 

Insights from the social sciences are applied to the 

missionary task of the church. Advocacy and con- 

textualization of the gospel in various cultures are 

studied. 

Weld MTh 2-3:50 Winter 

NPTS M251 

The Church and Mission 

This weekend module, primarily for M.A.R.E. and 
orientation students, defines the mission of the 
church and surveys Covenant home and world 
missions. Intensive. 
Weld 1/24-25, TBA Winter 



NBTS M-477a 

Contemporary Issues in International Mission 

A team-taught seminar that will engage students 
and faculty from three Cluster seminaries. 
Students will work in teams on selected issues that 
confront the church in mission on six continents. 
The three faculty will serve in resource and reflec- 
tive roles. The seminar will meet weekly at Shalom 
House, 4064 South Lake Park, Chicago. 
Bakke /Barbour /Brown T 7-9:40 pm Winter 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

L THE NATURE AND PRACTICE 

OF MINISTRY 

CTUM-510 

Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Szura TBA Fall /Winter /Spring 

G-ETS 22-623 

Rural Communities and the Small Church 

Analysis of the various kinds of rural communities 
in the midst of social change, including ethical 
issues related to agriculture, and the appropriate 
patterns and strategies for the Christian communi- 
ty in carrying out its mission in such settings; field 
visits and case studies included. 
Tholin/Keefer Th 6-8:50 pm Winter 

G-ETS 34-504 

The Administration of the Local Church 

Understanding the local church as a covenant 
community (biblically, theologically, functionally, 
and institutionally). Facing issues of authority and 
power. Consideration of covenantal administra- 
tion, connectionally and liturgically, as a process 
and in special events (baptisms, confirmations, ho- 
ly communion, weddings, memorial services). Prac- 
tice and preparation of a mission statement and 
building support for the local church's mission. 
TBA MW 3:30-5 Winter 

LSTC M-450 

Pastoral and Lay Leadership 

A study of church administration in general, with 
emphasis on the particular functions of the pastor 
and the laity in parish life and leadership. Half of 
the course time is spent in the classroom, half in 
workshops. Prereq: Internship. 
Conrad TTh 8:30-9:45 Winter 




65 



Ministry Studies 



LSTC M-490 

Church Administration 

The course will assist the student in developing a 
theology, theory, and praxis of the pastor as con- 
gregational officer, institutional manager, and mis- 
sion planner. We will give attention to the personal 
and professional needs of students in making the 
transition from classroom to parish. Prereq: Intern- 
ship. 
Bozeman TTh 11-12:15 Winter 

MTS M-307 

Preparing for Ministry: Polity and Worship in 

the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. 

Students are prepared for thinking and acting effec- 
tively in the various church structures they enter. 
Special attention is given to the relation between 
polity, politics and church life. Presbyterian 
students will receive specific assistance in relation 
to Standard Ordination Examinations in polity 
and worship. Recommended for Middlers. 
Worley/Bowden F 9-11:50 Winter 

MTS M-420H 

Interpretacion Historico-social del 

Desarrollo de las Comunidades Puertoriquenas 

y Mexicanas en los Estados Unidos de Norte 

America (Socio-Historical Interpretations of the 

Development of Puerto Rican and Mexican 

Communities in the U.S.) 

Se examinan en este curso algunos ensayos 

historicos, economicos y politicos sobre la ex- 

periencia de los hispanos en los Estados Unidos 

continentales. Aspira el curso a proporcionar a los 

estudiantes de ministerio recursos que los ayuden 

en su quehacer pastoral en las comunidades 

hispanas. Meets at El Centre 

Garcia M 6:30-9:30 pm Winter 

NPTS Ml 74 

Team Ministry: Theory and Practice 

This course will examine personal perceptions of 
staff ministry as well as gifts and skills that impact 
the results of working together. A common 
theology, goal and objective statements, job 
demands/enrichment and multiple leadership 
styles will be discussed. 
Johnson Th 4-5 Winter 

NPTS M261 

Theology and Practice of Evangelism 

Exploration of both self and congregation as 
evangelists and of several models for evangelism. 
Use of biblical, historical, theological perspectives 



to create faithful models for present ministry. 
Carlson M 2-5 Winter 

NPTS M266 

Discipleship: Theology and Practice 

The course aims to provide a comprehensive and 
practical experience in being a disciple, making 
disciples and training disciples. It is intended to 
equip students to do personal-context and church- 
context discipling. 
D.Anderson T 7-10 pm Winter 

NBTS M-372 

Church Administration 

This course explores the concept of the ministry 
and its duties. The organization and program of the 
local church receives attention in its relationship to 
the community, the denomination and the world 
mission. 
TBA 



Th 2:30-5:10 



Winu 



NBTS M-377 

The Theology and Practice of Evangelism 

This course is a study of the biblical message of the 
Gospel, its personal communication in contem- 
porary society, and an introduction to the assess- 
ment of evangelistic strategies in local churches and 
affiliated mission agencies. 
Bakke T 2-4:40 Winter 

NBTS CM-470 
Theology of Ministry 

This course is an examination of the vision of 
ministry implicit in major theological options and 
of theological foundations of recent efforts to ar- 
ticulate a theology of ministry. Students will be en- 
couraged to formulate their own understanding of 
ministry with special concern for coherence of 
biblical, historical, theological and practical aspects 
of the question. 
Bakke /Dayton /Jones Th 7-9:40 pm Winter 

S-WTS 14-612S 

The Management of Ministry 

Ways of assisting the parish to operate effectively in 
terms of established goals for its community life 
and ministry. Approaching the parish as a social 
system, the course will cover such topics as working 
with volunteers, staff relationships, budgets and 
finance, record keeping, the management of pro- 
perty, Canon Law, and planning and evaluating 
parish programs. 
Carlson TBA Winter 



66 



Ministry Studies 



Pastoral Care 



TEDS PC 712 
Advanced Counseling 

Advanced counseling techniques including par- 
ticipation in active counseling as a participant- 
observer. 
Secor TBA Winter 



II. PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-381 

Introduction to Care and Counseling 

This course involves an introduction to personality 
theory from several perspectives, an introduction 
to ethics as a theological component of all counsel- 
ing, a study of human documents through ver- 
batim transcripts of caring conversations, and 
beginning training in skills of listening and 
diagnosis. 
Polk W 2:30-5:15 Winter 

CTSCM-417 

Humor as Healing and Grace 

An exploration of the physiological, psychological 
and theological understanding of humor and its ef- 
fects upon the person and the community. We will 
focus on the whole person and the interrelation- 
ship of such themes as joy and grief, the comic and 
the tragic, and the physical and spiritual release in 
laughter. 
Anderson T 2-5 Winter 

CTS CM-500 

Topics in Psychotherapy: Transference and 

Countertransference 

An advanced course in psychotherapeutic theory 
and technique. Consent of instructor required. 
Moore M 2-5 Winter 

CTSCM-551 

Advanced Gestalt Therapy and 

Pastoral Counseling 

Intensive experience and exploration of the theory 
of Gestalt Therapy giving special attention to its 
relevance for pastoral counseling both in the parish 
setting and in specialized ministries. Prereq: 
CM-451 or equivalent. Consent of instructor re- 
quired. 
Anderson M 6:30-9:30 pm Winter 

G-ETS 32-501 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Justes (32-510B) MW 5:30-7:20 pm Winter 



G-ETS 32-608 

The Dream as a Hermeneutical Tool 

Exploration of the dream as a way by which in- 
dividuals express the felt meanings of their lives 
and as a way of understanding human dynamics. 
Attention given to various approaches to dream in- 
terpretation as well as to possible application to the 
biblical texts. Students are expected to keep a per- 
sonal dream diary. Limit: 10. Prereq: 32-501, per- 
mission of the instructor. 
Ashbrook Th 1:30-4:20 Winter 

G-ETS 32-634 

The Pastor as Counselor: Pre-Marital, 

Marital, and Family Counseling 

Theory and practice of pastoral counseling with 
couples and families. Issues with couples in pre- 
marital, marital, divorce, and post-marital situa- 
tions as well as counseling issues with families of 
nuclear, single parent, blended, and/or extended 
composition. Prereq: 32-501. 
TBA TBA Winter 

LSTC M-436 

Alcoholism and Drug Abuse 

This course will deal with the dynamics of chemical 
dependency and drug abuse. Consideration will be 
given to etiology, symptomatology, intervention 
and after care. Alcoholism and drug abuse will be 
viewed from the perspective of family disease. Field 
trips and workshops will be included. 
Malin/ Johnson Th 1-3:30 Winter 

LSTC M-440 
Hospice Training 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bauermeister/ Staff TBA Winter 

LSTC M-622 B and E 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bauermeister F 1-2:30 Winter 

MTS M-310 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

This course leads students toward a basic 
understanding of the meaning and practice of 
pastoral care. Focusing on various historical and 
contemporary models and styles of pastoral care, it 
helps students acquire skills necessary for field 
education, clinical pastoral education, advanced 
courses with experiental components, internships, 
and pastoral ministry itself. 
Ashby M 7-9:50 pm Winter 




67 



Pastoral Care 

NPTS Ml 22 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

Marriage enrichment groups are supplemented 
with case method, readings, and guest presenta- 
tions to equip counseling and congregational 
ministries for the needs of marriage and families. 
Hallsten W 7-10 pm Winter 

NPTSM221 

Grief, Death and Dying 

Guest presentations, lecture, readings, and case 
method provide an analysis of terminal illness and 
its implications for the patient and family, and for 
pastoral care for the dying and bereaved. 
Jackson M 7-10 pm Winter 

NPTSM321 
Pastoral Counseling 

Readings and discussion explore the principle ap- 
proaches and history of pastoral counseling, and 
case method applies these concepts to pastoral 
situations. Guest presentations to speak to areas, 
e.g., pharmacology, etc. Prereq: M-120 or equiv. 
Hallsten T 2-5 Winter 

NBTS M-394H 

Teorias de la Personalidad en el Contexto 
Hispano (Theories of Personality in the 
Hispanic Context) 

Este curso es un estudio de varias teorias de la per- 
sonalidad y su relacion al entendimiento cristiano 
de la persona. El curso esta disenado para que los 
estudiantes tengan una comprension de aquellos 
aspectos de la personalidad que determinan y afec- 
tan la conducta. Los estudiantes trabajaran en for- 
mular una definicion de la personalidad hispana. 
Taylor T 6-8:40 pm Winter 

NBTS M-395 

Fundamentals of Pastoral Care and Counseling 

This course will examine the philosophical, 
biblical, sociological and psychological base for 
counseling. Subjects such as characteristics of a 
good counselor, knowledge of clients and basic 
types of counseling will be discussed. Basic skills for 
counseling will be emphasized. The course com- 
bines theory and practice in pastoral counseling. 
Taylor M 2:30-5:10 Winter 

NBTS M-494 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

This is a course designed to provide pastors, profes- 
sionals and para-professionals with information 
concerning premarital, marital and family counsel- 



Liturgy and Worship 

ing. Considerable time will be spent on the major 
areas of marriage relationships and the problems 
that arise within these areas. Divorce will be con- 
sidered from biblical, psychological and 
sociological perspectives. 
Ideran W 7-9:40 pm Winter 

S-WTS 13-602GS 

Pastoral Care in Crisis Situation 

Pastoral care is often initiated in response to a life 
crisis such as illness, death, substance abuse, 
suicide attempt, or a breakdown in marital or fami- 
ly relationships. This course will focus on the 
dynamics of these crises and explore approaches to 
crisis intervention and the unique resources 
available to clergy in offering pastoral care. Limit: 
30. 
Carlson TBA Winter 

TEDS PT 570 

Personal Development for Ministry 

A study encouraging self-assessment and the 
measuring of gifts for careers in ministry and cover- 
ing the personal disciplines of piety, and of in- 
terpersonal relationships in the light of biblical 
materials designed to focus on the leading of an ex- 
emplary Christian life midst the pressures of school 
and parish life. 
Larsen TBA Winter 



III. LITURGY AND WORSHIP 
STUDIES 

CTU T-355 

Sacraments: Theology and Celebration 

This course will explore the human-religious ex- 
perience of the faith community and its expression 
in sacramental celebration with particular atten- 
tion to Initiation, Reconciliation, and Eucharist. A 
basic course in the sacraments designed for those 
who will not take separate courses in these 
sacraments. 
Hughes MW 10-11:15 Winter 



CTU T-450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

(For course description, see Fall. 
Ostdiek MW 1-2:15 



CTU T-455 
Initiation 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Keifer TTh 10-11:15 



Wintei 



Wintey 



68 



Liturgy and Worship 



CTU T-559 

Worship in Multi-Cultural Community 

An exploration of the needs, prospects, and 
possibilities for the development o{ liturgical pat- 
terns which affirm and support minority cultures. 
An application of fundamental principles of 
Catholic worship to minority or multi-cultural 
parishes. 
Keifer T 1-3:30 Winter 

CTU T-550 

Liturgical Seasons 

A seminar course which will trace the development 
of liturgical feasts and seasons and explore the con- 
temporary pastoral conflicts and challenges in the 
celebration of the Church year. Students will 
choose a topic of personal interest for their own 
research. 
Hughes M 2:30-5 Winter 

CTU T-554 

Great Books in Liturgy and Preaching 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Huels/Staff M 7-9:30 pm Fall/ Winter /Spring 

LSTC M-487 

The Christian Year 

A study of the development of Sunday as Christian 
feast day and the historical development oi the 
church year seasons. The course will focus on the 
sanctification of time and the remembrance of the 
Christ-event through the feasts and seasons of the 
Christian year. Practical projects will focus on im- 
plementing church year themes in parish settings. 
Rochelle M 740 pm Winter 



ty to the Sacraments, order of worship, public 
prayers, weddings, funerals, music in worship, 
children in worship, and observance of the Chris- 
tian year. 
Wardlaw MW 10-11:50 Winter 

SML MS-370 
Vocal Practicum I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Wojcik MWF 2:40-3:35 Winter 

SMLMS-371 

Understanding Modern Music 

An analysis and experience of the content and 

direction of modern music. 

Wojcik TTh 9:55- 11:15 Winter 

SML MS-380 
Vocal Practicum II 

A further development of Practicum I. Primary 
focus is ministerial chanting of liturgical texts and 
functioning as cantor at worship. As a by-product, 
it develops skills of interpretative speaking and 
reading. Prereq: MS-370 or private audition. 
Wojcik TBA Winter/Spring 

S-WTS 09-522S 
Anglican Worship 

A study of the Book of Common Prayer and the 
distinctive Anglican ethos of worship from the 
First Prayer Book of 1549 and its sources to the 
American Prayer Book of 1979. The structure and 
theology of the various revisions, especially in 
England and the United States. 
Mitchell TBA Winter 



LSTC M-539 

Ministry through the Occasional Services 

After examining the psychosocial and the liturgical 
contexts of the occasional services, the ministry 
modalities of worship, pastoral care, music, and 
preaching will be explored. Particular attention will 
be concentrated on weddings, funerals, and 
ministry to the sick and dying. Prereq: LSTC 
M-380 or equiv. 
Banger /Bauermeister MW 11-12:15 Winter 

MTSM-314 

Understanding the Dynamics of 

Corporate Worship 

We begin by studying the nature of authentic, cor- 
porate Christian worship, from theological, 
historical and pastoral perspectives. In light of that 
understanding, we then explore what gives integri- 



S-WTS 09-644S 

The Liturgical Movement 

A study of the basic principles of the Liturgical 
Movement, the basis for contemporary liturgical 
revision in Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran 
and Reformed Churches throughout the world. 
Students will read in Louis Bouyer, Odo Casel, the 
Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, Gergory Dix, 
William P. Ladd, Massey Sheperd, and others, 
and in the contemporary liturgical texts of the 
Episcopal Church and other churches. 
Mitchell TBA Winter 



69 



Preaching and Communication 



IV. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

BTS M-476 

Practicum in Biblical Preaching 

A workshop approach to exegetical skill as it leads 
to communication, the writing of sermons, and the 
delivery of sermons. The student will have the op- 
portunity to test several styles of homiletic method. 
Snyder /Faus WF 10:40-12 Winter 

CTU M-449 

Communication Skills for Public Ministry 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Hang T 7-9:30 pm Winter 

CTU M-450 A,B,C,D 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Hang/Staff Sem. ABCD: M 8:30-9:45 Winter 
Lab. A: M 2:30-4:30 

B: W 2:30-4:30 

C: Th 1-3 

D: Th 3-5 

CTU T-558 

Research Seminar in Preaching 

Students bring to this seminar their own research 
interests which are promoted and developed 
through guided readings and discussion in order to 
elaborate in seminar sessions a theology of pro- 
clamation. Students will research topics such as in- 
tercultural preaching, history of preaching, mass 
media, hermeneutics, the Holy Spirit and 
preaching, etc. 
Staff W 2:30-5 Winter 

CTS CM-301 
Proclamation 

What is proclamation? What does it aim to do? 
How does it happen? The course will be concerned 
with these and other related issues — call, faith, 
conversion, the church, Holy Spirit. Resources will 
be drawn from a broad range of biblical, historical, 
theological, poetic and literary material. 
Edgerton W 2-5 Winter 

G-ETS 31-606 

Truths in Search of a Voice 

A look at aspects of the Christian faith that are 
primarily relevant to a confused and fearful world. 
A search for better ways to understand and com- 
municate the gospel. Special attention given to the 
meaning of salvation, the scope of redemption, the 



Kingdom of God, eschatology, the incarnation. 
Some classroom preaching included. Prereq: 
31-501. Limit: 12. 
Campbell M 7-9:50 pm Winter 

LSTC M-340A 

Ministry in Preaching (Teaching Parish) 

The aim of the course is to help students develop a 
holistic view of preaching which does justice to 
four factors: the preacher, the listener, the message, 
and the churchly context, so as to establish sound 
practice in sermon design and delivery. Lectures, 
discussions, readings, lab sessions, teaching parish 
experience. 
Niedenthal Th 8:30-9:45 + practice sec. Winter 

LSTC M-340B 

Ministry in Preaching (Teaching Parish) 

An introductory course in witnessing to the 
biblical message through preaching. Pericope 
analysis; goal/diagnosis/prognosis analysis; 
development o{ ideas; examination of styles, occa- 
sions, settings, content for preaching. Format in- 
cludes lectures, readings, discussions, peer evalua- 
tions, lab sessions, teaching parish experience. 
Deppe Th 8:30-9:45 + practice sec. Winter 

MTS M-431 

Preaching with the Congregation 

We explore the corporateness of preaching by in- 
volving the student with members of a congrega- 
tion in the preparation, delivery, and evaluation of 
two sermons. We exegete the congregation to 
sharpen communication, and explore in depth par- 
ticular issues of each student for growth in 
preaching. Meets 3 times both Winter and Spring. 
Wardlaw /Wilson/ Adj. W 2-5 Winter /Spring 

NPTSM110 
Public Speaking 

The pastor must be an effective communicator. 
Basic verbal and non-verbal factors in the delivery 
of a speech will be reviewed and practiced. 
TBA MTTh 10:15-11:30 Winter 

NPTS Ml22a 
Communicating the Faith II 

Theory and practice of communicating the Chris- 
tian faith through preaching and evangelism, with 
emphasis on the parish. The course will be largely 
experience oriented. Prereq: Ml 2 la. 
Hjelm MTTh 8-9:15 Winter 



70 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



NPTS M125a 
Senior Preaching I 

The course is predicated on preaching experience, 
usually the internship year. The focus is one 
preaching gifts to be discovered/affirmed through 
lab preaching and class critique. 
A. Nelson TTh 11:40-1:10 Winter 

A.Nelson T 1:20-2:50 Winter 

TBA TBA Winter 

TBA TBA Winter 

NBTS M-391 

The Church and Preaching 

This introductory course is a middler seminar- 
practicum focused on preaching as the interpreta- 
tion and communication of God's Word to God's 
People. It presents the theoretical, theological and 
methodological framework for homiletic discipline 
and provides a supervised laboratory experience in 
which student preachers develop their ability to 
prepare and deliver sermons. 
TBA F 2:30-5:10 Winter 

NBTS M-391H 

Metodologias y Practica de la Predicacion 
en Contextos Hispanos (Methodologies and 
Practice of Preaching in the Hispanic Context) 

Consideracion de los fundamentos biblico- 
teologicos y factores psico-sociologicos presentes en 
la predicacion en contextos hispanos. Enfasis en la 
preparacion de planes sistematicos de predicacion 
pastoral. Los estudiantes predicaran sermones ex- 
puestos a videograbacion, evaluacion de la clase y 
posterior autoevaluacion y entrevista con el pro- 
fesor. 
Mottesi T 8-9:20 and 11-12:20 Winter 

SMLMS-212 

Reading and Preaching the Gospel: 

Homiletics I 

An introduction to the "primary task" of the priest 
(Vatican II). Oral interpretation of the Lectionary. 
Purpose and shape of the homily. Immediate 
preparation: short daily homily, wake and funeral 
services, wedding homilies, and preaching to 
children. 

TBA W¥ 8:25-9:45 Winter 

TBA WF 9:25-10:45 Winter 

S-WTS 11-501S 
Preparation for Preaching 

A study of the theology of Christian proclamation 
and of the steps one goes through in the prepara- 
tion of effective sermons, including interpretation 



of the biblical passages appointed for the day, 
development of ideas, sermon construction, and il- 
lustration. Vi unit. 
Edwards TBA Winter 

S-WTS 11-602S 
Practice in Preaching 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Edwards TBA Winter 

S-WTS 11-505S 

The Use of the Voice in the Conduct of 

Public Worship 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Petersen TBA Winter 

S-WTS 11-503 
The Hymnal 1982 

A study of the new and revised texts together with 
rehearsal of music which is unfamiliar. The music 
for office and Eucharist will be reheared with con- 
sideration for normal parish use. The proposed 
hymn lectionary will be studied for use with the 
cyclical readings of the Book of Common Prayer. Vi 
unit. 
Petersen TBA Winter 



V. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTU M-464 
Sacramental Catechesis 

This course will address the complementarity be- 
tween liturgy and catechesis. Attention will be 
given to defining the needs of the community being 
catechized — adults, youth, children — and 
development of programs and teaching 
methodology to serve these needs. 
Lucinio W 2:30-5 Winter 

CTS CM-428 

Religious Education for Faith Transmission 

Is there an architecture of faith, a framework or a 
map offering the traveler a universal faith pattern? 
How does the church's educational plan help or 
hinder the "faithing" person? This course is a 
critical consideration of the implications for 
religious education of Whitehead and Whitehead, 
Erikson and Fowler's work. 
Myers T 9:30-12:20 Winter 

G-ETS 33-504 

Curriculum for Christian Education 

A survey of curriculum resources produced for use 



71 



Educational Ministry 



in contemporary teaching-learning settings; special 
attention to the development of the student's own 
criteria for evaluation, including introduction to 
curriculum theory. Limit: 15; open only to M.C.E. 
students and Level II and III. M.Div. students. 
Furnish TTh 940:50 Winter 

G-ETS 33-506 

The Pastor as Educator 

The pastor's role and responsibilities in planning, 
developing, administering, and evaluating the 
educational program in the local congregation, 
with emphasis on the small church. Limit: 25; open 
only to Levels II and III students. 
Wingeier MW 5:30-7:20 pm Winter 

G-ETS 33-635 

Senior Christian Education Seminar 

A comprehensive survey of bibliography in the 
field of Christian Education, case studies with 
which students practice the integration of resources 
from theology, Bible, and history with functions 
expected of a Christian educator and with the stu- 
dent's own self-understanding. (Required for 
M.C.E. students; open to Level III M.Div. with 
permission of Ch.Ed. faculty.) 
Furnish TTh 3:30-5 Winter 

MTSM-313 

The Educational Ministry of the Church 

This course will include an introduction to ap- 
proaches to education and the dimension of plan- 
ning for education in the church, including prin- 
ciples of teaching and learning and resources for 
use now and in the future. 
Caldwell F 9-11:50 Winter 

M/L M-459/UA-461 

Urban Academy Seminar: Politics of Compas- 
sion 

(For course description, see UA-461 in Ethical 

Studies II.) 

Simpson W 3-5 Winter 

NPTS M234 

Ministry with Early Childhood Persons 

The theory and practice of the development of the 
young child and of the responsibilities of the home 
and church for their nurture in the Christian faith 
are here examined. 
Philips M 2-5 Winter 



NPTS M271 
Hymnology 

This historical overview of the great hymnic 
periods of the Christian church provides an 
analysis of selected hymns from theological, 
musical and poetical perspectives. It introduces and 
gives ideas for practical usage of The Covenant 
Hymnal in the local parish setting. Intensive. 
Eckhardt 1/31-2/1, TBA Winter 

NBTS M-383 

Teaching Methods and Practice 

This course is a practicum for planning, executing 
and evaluating teaching/learning situations for 
team ministry in an educational context and for ex- 
perimentation with a variety of teaching styles and 
techniques. Video-taping of on-site teaching for 
purposes of evaluation and personal goal setting is 
utilized. 
Morris Th 7-9:40 pm Winter 

NBTS M-484 
Ministry With Youth 

This course aims to develop the student's ministry 
skills with youth including: teaching prayer, com- 
munion, advocacy and trouble making. Three set- 
tings are used for leadership development in- 
cluding: (1) interviews with high school students; 
(2) a weekend retreat; and (3) seminar leadership 
on a selected topic. Church and community ap- 
proaches to youth will be considered. 
Amidon M 7-9:40 pm Winter 

NBTS M-484aH 

Minsterio Educacional Juvenil en el Contexto 

Hispano I (Educational Ministry with Youth in 

Hispanic Contexts I) 

Este curso es un estudio de varios temas en el 

ministerio juvenil hispano. Se enforcara en los 

asuntos que son: (1) mas perturbadores en nuestro 

tiempo, (2) mas influenciales en el desarrollo de la 

juventud, (3) mas utiles en comprender las 

necesidades de desarrollo y patrones de crecimien- 

to juvenil. 

Arauz Th 6-8:40 pm Winter 

NBTS M-487 

Educational Ministry with Adults 

In this course a study of the developmental needs 
and growth patterns of male and female adults and 
of appropriate teaching methods will preface stu- 
dent presentations on selected aspects and styles of 
adult ministry. 
Morris M 9:30-12:10 Winter 



72 



Canon La 



w 



VI. CANON LAW 

CTUM-421 
Church and Structure 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Huels MW 1 1:30-12:45 



Winter 



CTU M-422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of Church 
legislation regarding the administration and recep- 
tion of the sacraments. Particular emphasis on 
matrimonial law and practice. 
Huels MW 2:30-3:45 Winter /Spring 



S-WTS 14-505S 
Canon Law 

A two-fold introduction to 1) the history of Chris- 
tian canonical legislation with particular emphasis 
on the canonical structures of the Episcopal 
Church; and to 2) the use of canon law in pastoral 
ministry. Vi unit. 
Carlson /Haugaard TBA Winter 



73 



Old Testament 

SPRING 1986 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 
GENERAL 

OLD TESTAMENT 
L INTRODUCTORY 

G-ETS 11-501 

Old Testament Interpretation: 

Pentateuch and Former Prophets 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Nash/TBA MTh 1:30-3:20 

LSTCB-312 

Old Testament Studies III 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Fuerst TTh 8:30-9:45 + disc sec 



Spring 



Spring 



NPTSB121 

Old Testament Faith II 

The monarchy and the prophetic literature are the 
major themes covered in lectures and discussions. 
Continued emphasis is placed on the relationship 
of this material to Judaism and Christianity. 
Prereq: B120. 
Holmgren MTWTh 10:15-11:30 Spring 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B-415 
Later Prophecy 

Key passages from Ezekiel, Deutero-Isaiah, and 
some post-exilic prophets will be studied within the 
context of ancient Israel and for their value in 
struggling with traditions and adapting them to 
new theological or pastoral situations. Important 
for appreciating the Old Testament basis of 
priesthood and church, suffering, redemption and 
re-creation. 
Hoppe T 7-9:30 pm Spring 

CTU B-425 
Wisdom Literature 

Primary focus will be on such perennial themes as 
creation, suffering, birth and death, retribution 
and immortality in Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, 
Sirach, and the Wisdom of Solomon. Wisdom 
theology with its emphasis on human behavior will 
be compared with other theologies found in the 
Old Testament. Attention will be given to the ap- 
plicability of this theology to contemporary human 



development and pastoral ministry. 

Hoppe MW 10-11:15 Spring 

MTS B-441 
Exodus 

A study of the book of Exodus, with special atten- 
tion to (1) the relation between narrative and legal 
forms in the book, and (2) the relations between ar- 
chaeology, history, and biblical theology for 
understanding the book and its impact. Hebrew is 
not required, but opportunity will be provided for 
its use. 
Baling 3/31-5/2, MW 2-5 Spring 

NBTS B-429 
Interpretation of the Psalms 

This seminar will include studies of selected Psalms 
as poems, as cultic expressions and as statements of 
faith. They are all intimately tied to the Hebrew 
religion, but some have deep meaning for present- 
day Christian faith, worship and practice. 
Bjornard MTh 1-2:20 Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN OLD TESTAMENT 

BTS B-325 

Old Testament Theology 

The class will explore the various approaches of do- 
ing a theology of the Old Testament. The special 
emphasis will be on kerygmatic theology. The 
course will conclude by discussing the relationship 
between the Old Testament and the New Testa- 
ment and the unity of the Old Testament. 
Roop WF 8-9:20 Spring 

CTS CH-302 

People & Faith of Israel II 

Research in biblical hermeneutics. The fundamen- 
tal problem of communication between Bible and 
present generation. Are there warrants that we ex- 
egete rather than eisegete? The authority, the 
relevance of the Biblical Text. The Bible as God's 
Word; exclusively, uniquely, paradigmatically? Is 
God speaking today? In conformity or dissimilarity 
with the Bible? 
LaCocque M 2-5 Spring 

CTS CH-422 

Biblical Narrative: From Myth to Parable 

A literary critical exploration into the biblical nar- 
rative and its sub-genres such as myths, epics, sagas, 
novellas, fables, historiographies, prophetic 
legends, parables, etc. The synchronical reading to 



74 



Old Testament 



which often the narrative invites is contrasted with 
the diachronical. The students thus are introduced 
into the modern hermeneutical debate. 
LaCocque T 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 11-605 
Apocalyptic Literature 

Advanced study of literary units or theological 
themes in Daniel and related writings, such as 1 
Enoch, 2 Baruch, The War Scroll (Dead Sea 
Scrolls) and Revelation. Emphasis on analytical 
and synthetic interpretive skills. 
TBA TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCB-511 
Genesis 1-11 

A study of Genesis 1-11, the purpose and function 
of these narratives in the Bible, and their relation- 
ship to other Ancient Near Eastern literature. 
Michel M 7-10 pm Spring 

MTS B-471 

The Archaeology of Palestine and the Bible 

An exploration of the findings of archaeology in 
Palestine as they pertain to the Bible. Attention is 
given to the interrelationship of archaeology, 
history, and Old Testament religion. Prereq: MTS 
B-301 and/or MTS B-302, or equiv. 
Boling/ Campbell M 7-9:50 pm Spring 



from year to year. 

Garvey 



TBA 



Spring 



SCJ B-472 

Jewish Approaches to Hebrew Scriptures 

How have Jews understood the Hebrew Bible over 
the ages? Topics include: the hermeneutics of 
Jewish biblical interpretation; exegesis; homelitical 
interpretation, rabbinic amplifications; medieval 
Jewish exegesis and modern Northwest Semitic 
Comparative Philology, the ongoing process of 
"Midrash;" the Midrash o{ the Rabbis, and the 
Midrash in the Gospels; and biblical festivals. 
Meeting place TBA. 
Graber Th 1:30-4 Spring 

TEDS OT 875 
Biblical Narratives 

Application of recent studies in Text-theory and 
Text-linguistics to selected biblical narratives. 
Hebrew required. 
Sailhamer TBA Spring 

IV. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

G-ETS 11-641/2 
Elementary Hebrew I/II 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Nash MTTh 12-1:15 (U) Spring 



NBTS B-325 

Old Testament Theology 

This course concentrates on the ideas of the 
various sections of the Old Testament as expres- 
sions of Israelite religion and as precursors to Chris- 
tianity. Major trends in modern study are con- 
sulted and weighed. Prereq: B-323 and B-324. 
Bjomard WF 10:40-12 Spring 

NBTS 1-400 

Eve in Bible, Theology and Culture 

An exegesis of Genesis 2:4-4:26 and New Testa- 
ment passages which mention Adam and Eve will 
provide the foundation from which to evaluate 
theological and cultural uses of the figure of Eve. 
Morris Th 7-9:40 pm Spring 

S-WTS 01-612GS 

Studies in the Pentateuch: Genesis 

The course will examine the Pentateuch, the 
history of the periods covered, the literary and 
critical analysis of the narrative, the books which 
comprise it and the themes present in it. The 
specific book, theme or topic covered will vary 



NPTS B101 
Hebrew Readings 

Following the completion of a study of Hebrew 
grammar and the verb system, which was begun in 
Elementary Hebrew (B100), readings from the 
Hebrew Bible are assigned. Prereq: B100. 
Holmgren MTWTh 1:30-2:30 Spring 

NPTS B104 
Intermediate Hebrew 

For course description, see Fall.) 

Phelan TBA Spring 

NBTSB-311bH 
Hebreo II (Hebrew II) 

Este curso es el segundo trimestre de una serie de 

dos trimestres. Vea 311aH (invierno) para una 

descripcion. 

Horning MW 2:30-3:50 Spring 

NBTS B-413 

Intermediate Hebrew Reading 

This course is an intermediate course in biblical 
Hebrew narrative, reading in the book of Judges. 
Nasgowitz TWF 1-1:50 Spring 



75 



New Testament 



NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-330 

Introduction to the New Testament 

This course is designed to give the student an in- 
troduction to the life, times, and message of the 
New Testament as the basis for further study and 
use. The total range of backgrounds, context, text, 
canon, history of interpretation and translation of 
the New Testament will come under study. 
Homing WF 10:40-12 Spring 

CTU B-305 

New Testament Introduction 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Osiek MW 10-11:15 Spring 

G-ETS 12/31-604 

Interpretation of the New Testament through 

Preaching: Parables 

Intensive study in and preaching from selected 
New Testament passages. Exegesis of Greek or 
English texts. Presentation of sermons before the 
class. Prereq: One foundational course in NT. and 
one in Preaching. Limit: 12. 
Chatfield/Stegner TTh 9-10:50 Spring 



LSTC B-331 
Gospel Tradition 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Danker MW 11-12:15, F 11-11:50 



Spring 



LSTC B-332 
Pauline Tradition 

A study of the composition and content of the ge- 
nuine Pauline epistles as well as the deuteropauline 
writings, placing them within their historical set- 
ting. Basic theological and ethical themes of Paul 
will be investigated. 
Krentz MTWF 9-9:50 Spring 

MTSB-313 
Paul 

An initial empathy for Paul will be gained. Paul's 
letters will be read and re-read each in its historical 
setting. Paul's story of how God acted in Jesus 
Christ will be explored: dying and rising in Christ; 
God's plan of action for the world; and, persons 
and communities in the new age. 
Thompson TTh 10-11:50 Spring 



NPTS B241 

Interpreting the New Testament II: 

Acts and Epistles 

The Book of Acts and selected epistles are examin- 
ed to gain insight into the New Testament and to 
understand the emergence of the early Church. 
Snodgrass MTWTh 10:15-11 :30 Spring 

NBTS B-330 

Interpreting the New Testament 

This introductory course in exegesis provides basic 
skills in interpreting the New Testament. Emphasis 
will be placed on the concrete application of these 
skills to representative New Testament texts. 
Cosgrove WF 2:30-3:50 Spring 

NBTS B-332 
Pauline Epistles 

This course is a general introduction to the life, let- 
ters and theology of Paul in their first century con- 
texts (Judaism, Graeco-Roman society and early 
Church). Attention is given as well to the history 
of Pauline interpretation and to the issues of 
methodology in the interpretation and use of 
Pauline texts today. 
Scholer M 2:30-5:10 Spring 

S-WTS 02-502GS 

New Testament Interpretation II: 

Acts — Revelation 

Builds on the work done in NT. I and focuses par- 
ticular attention on first-century Judaism, basically 
on St. Paul and New Testament books outside the 
Gospel. 
Pervo TBA Spring 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-436 
Acts 

Acts of the Apostles: A critical study of the book of 
Acts, both as a source for the history of primitive 
Christianity and as a part of the theological pro- 
gram of Luke-Acts. 
Gardner T 7-9:45 pm Spring 

CTU B-430 

The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the content, structure, and major motifs 
of the Gospel of Matthew. Particular attention will 



76 



New Testament 



be given to the evangelist's role as an interpreter of 
tradition and history for a community in transi- 
tion. The course will consider the theological and 
ministerial relevance of Matthew's message for such 
questions as Church authority and ethics. 
Senior M 7-9:30 pm Spring 



CTU B-440 

The Gospel According to John 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Osiek TTh 10-11:15 



Spring 



CTS CH-425 

The Christologies of Paul and the 

Gospel of John 

A study of the theological center of the New Testa- 
ment. The distinctness of each author will be em- 
phasized, but an attempt will also be made to show 
convergences in the movement toward the con- 
struction of essential Christian theology. 
Scroggs TTh 9-3040:50 Spring 

G-ETS 12-606 

The Parables of Jesus 

Contemporary parable research as a way of 
discovering the meaning of the parables in the 
message of the early church and in the teaching of 
Jesus. Limit: 16. 
Stegner WF 940:50 Spring 

LSTC B-547 

Proclamation Values in I and II Peter and Jude 

Exploration of selected thematic problems and 
history-of-tradition factors, with emphasis on the 
theological contribution of these documents. For 
students who consider themselves past the Beginn- 
ing Greek level. Prereq: Greek. 
F. Danker TF 1-2:15 Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS IN 
NEW TESTAMENT 

BTS B-339 

The Post-New Testament Church: 

Signs and Theology 

This course examines early and contemporary 
marks of Christian life (baptism, eucharist, 
ministry) and early trinitarian reflections of eastern 
and western theologians. We will ask how, in the 



early church and today, Christians of diverse tradi- 
tions confess and live out our common tradition as 
members of Christ's living body. 
Meyer W 2:30-5:15 Spring 

BTS B-438 

Biblical Seminar: 

Parables and the Language of Faith 

This course is concerned with our use of language 
itself as faithful or idolatrous. Parables will be ex- 
amined as to how persons discern and properly 
communicate truth signified by, but not contained 
in, words of faith. 
Meyer TTh 9:30-10:50 Spring 

CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

The attitude of the Bible towards the outside world 
will be investigated for direction in the world mis- 
sion of the Church today. Subjects considered: the 
cultural and moral interdependency of Israel with 
the nations as well as to such motifs as election, 
universal salvation and monotheism; the mission of 
Jesus and its interpretation of the theologies of 
select Gospels, Pauline Letters and other New 
Testament writings. 
Senior /Stuhlmueller MW 1-2:15 Spring 

CTU B-562 

Justice in the Liberation Rereading of the Bible 

Apart from 'kingdom of God' there is no theme of 
the Bible more central to the concerns of liberation 
theologians than 'justice.' It is also the most urgent 
prophetic call of, and challenge to, our times. We 
will accompany the liberation theologians as they 
reread the biblical texts. 
Reynolds W 2:30-5 Spring 

CTU B-592 

The Eucharist in the New Testament 

An investigation of the Eucharist's origins and 
development in the New Testament period, focus- 
ing on historical questions as well as on the literary 
and pastoral presentation of the Eucharist in the 
various New Testament writings, and addressing 
the way our findings challenge the Church of to- 
day with regard to both inculturation and social 
justice. 
LaVerdiere Th 1-3:30 Spring 




77 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



CTU B-599 
MA Seminar 

This course prepares students for researching and 
writing their M.A. thesis on biblical topics. The 
major focus will be methodological, directing 
students in the use of primary and secondary 
sources and in styles of exegesis. The content of the 
course will be determined by the specialization of 
the students involved in the course. 
Karris T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTU 1-580 
Hermeneutics 

A survey of some of the principal theories of inter- 
pretation in contemporary theology. Attention will 
be directed to their application in a variety of situa- 
tions, with particular attention to New Testament 
texts. 
Karris /Schreiter M 2:30-5 Spring 

CTS CH-523 

The New Testament in Sociological Perspective 

A seminar showing how sociological approaches 
allow new insights into early Christian com- 
munities and their theologies. Prereq: CH-321 or 
equivalent. 
Scroggs MW 11-12:20 Spring 

LSTC B-440 

New Testament Theology 

Although the New Testament will be considered in 
its unity, the theology must be studied according to 
its major representatives: Jesus, Paul, Synoptic 
Gospels, John. Secondary sources will be the New 
Testament theologies of Bultmann, Kummel, and 
others. Prereq: Greek. 
Unss MW 11-12:15 Spring 

LSTC B-628 

Christianity at the End of the 

New Testament Era 

Seminar on problems in the history of the church 
from A.D. 70 to 135. Topics covered will include a 
survey of the sources (canonical and extra- 
canonical), local forms of Christianity, the growth 
of Christian apocalyptic, Christological 
developments, "early Catholicism," etc. Wide 
reading in New Testament and other sources in 
Greek. (For post-M.Div. students; admission o{ 
others by consent of instructor.) 
Krentz MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 



NPTS B280 

The Use of the Old Testament in the 

New Testament 

An analysis will be made of the principles and 
method by which the Old Testament is interpreted 
in the New Testament. Both specific texts and 
specific New Testament writers will receive atten- 
tion. 
Snodgrass M 7-10 pm Spring 

IV. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 
BTS/NBTSB-416 
Greek Readings 

N. Holsey TBA Spring 

MTS B-428 

Greek Exegesis: Paul's Prison Epistles 

An exegesis course in Paul's authentic letters from 
prison, Phillippians and Philemon, which will also 
explore the image of Paul as "prisoner of Christ" in 
the deutero-Pauline literature (Ephesians, Colos- 
sians, 2 Timothy) and in the apocryphal acts. At- 
tention will be given to literary, theological and 
political dimensions of these writings. Prereq: 
Greek I and II. Meets at Winnetka Congregational 
Church, Winnetka. 
Welborn W 7-10 pm Spring 

NPTS Bl 14 

New Testament Greek Readings 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Snodgrass TBA Spring 

NBTS B-438aH 

Exegesis griego de Santiago (Greek 

Exegesis of James) 

Este curso es un estudio del texto griego de San- 
tiago. Se enfocara en el contexto historico- 
sociologico-teologico de esta carta en la iglesia 
primitiva, con un enfoque especial en la relevancia 
de su mensaje en el contexto hispano. 
Horning T 2-4:40 Spring 

HISTORICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTUH-310 

Christian Reformation and 

Counter-Reformation History 

A study is made of the factors influencing the 
breakdown of the medieval synthesis. The develop- 
ment of the major reform traditions with the 
response of Rome before, during and after Trent is 



78 



Historical Studies 



presented. Finally the impact of this division on 

Europe and the Church is considered. 

Borntrager MW 1-2:15 Spring 

CTS CH-345 

History of Christian Thought II 

From the Reformation through the nineteenth cen- 
tury. A survey of significant theological 
movements, with attention to their social context. 
A selected theme will provide focus. Theme for 
1985-6: Redemption. (This course may be elected 
independently of History of Christian Thought I.) 
Bass TTh 11-12:20 Spring 

G-ETS 13-503 

History of Christianity III 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Murphy WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCH-310B 

Studies in Ancient and Medieval 

Church History 

An introductory seminar on ideas, events, and per- 
sonalities in the life of the church down to the 16th 
century. Particular attention will be given to the 
Ecumenical Councils, to selected figures such as 
Irenaeus, Augustine, Aquinas, and Palamas, and to 
doctrinal development. 
Tobias MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTCH-331 

Reformation — Orthodoxy — Pietism 

A foundational course, offered as an option to 
students who prefer a full quarter to explore Chris- 
tian thought and life from the beginning of the Pro- 
testant Reformation down to the middle of the 
18th century, to be followed by a full quarter 
course devoted to developments since that time. 
(An alternative to H-330A or B.) 
Fischer MWF 11-11:50 Spring 

MTS T/H-322 

Christian Thought in the West from 

1750 to the Present 

This course will study ways in which Christians 
have thought about faith and the life of the 
Church from roughly 1750 to the present. The 
course is designed to help us understand the path 
by which we have reached our present theological 
situation, and to learn some of history's lessons for 
dealing creatively with it. 
Mudge TTh 8-9:50 Spring 



NBTS C-341 

Early and Medieval Christianity 

This course is an examination of issues and 
developments in Christian life and thought from 
the beginning of the second century to the time of 
the Reformation. Regular and intensive reading, 
both in primary and secondary sources, is em- 
phasized as a basis for meaningful classroom discus- 
sion. 
Webber W 2:30-5:10 Spring 

S-WTS 03-503S 

General Church History III: The Continental 

Reformation and Missionary Outreach 

(1500-1648) 

A survey of the life and thought of the Christian 
church during the sixteenth-century reformation 
and counter-reformation with attention to the ex- 
tension of Christianity to the Americas and to the 
distinctive forms of doctrine and practice which 
emerged in Lutheran, Reformed, Anabaptist, and 
Roman Catholic traditions. 
Haugaard TBA Spring 



II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

BTS H-445 

The Intentional Community 

A study of religiously based communitarian 
movements in Christian history, focusing on such 
groups as the Hutterites, the Renewed Moravian 
Church, the Ephrata Community, the Shakers, 
Amana, the Hutterian Society of the Brothers, 
Koinonia Farm, and the Ecumenical Institute. 
Durnbaugh T 7-9:45 pm Spring 

CTS CH-367 

History and Polity of the United Church 

of Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, in- 
cluding its antecedents: the Congregational Chris- 
tian Churches and the Evangelical and Reformed 
Church. This course earns one credit and satisfies 
current UCC requirements for Ordination. 
Smith et al. TBA Spring 

G-ETS 13/21/34-673 
Ecumenical Trends in Social Struggle: 
The 20th Century (United Methodist 
History/Doctrine/Polity C) 

A study of theological and ethical developments in 
Methodist churches in their participation in the 



79 



Historical Studies 



growing ecumenical movement and in the matur- 
ing economic and political power of the nation. A 
study of the evolution of the policy of the United 
Methodist Church with its uniquely connectional 
character in an increasingly pluralistic society (1 
unit). 
Keller/TBA T 7-9:50 pm Spring 



LSTC H-360 

The Lutheran Heritage 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Pero MW 1-2:15 



Spring 



NPTS H200 

Free Church Heritage 

The course is designed to. help the student under- 
stand and interpret the evangelical and pietistic 
tradition within which the Evangelical Covenant 
Church stands. Attention is given to the Reforma- 
tion, to expressions of pietism and to its historic 
and theological development in Sweden and North 
American in the 19th and 20th centuries. 
G. Anderson MTWTh 8-9:15 Spring 

NBTS 1-302 

ABC/USA as Context of Ministry 

This course provides students with an exposure to 
personnel, polity, procedures and programs of their 
actual and potential denominational family 
(ABC/USA) by bringing representative members 
of that denominational family into meaningful en- 
counter with the seminary family. Students earn 
one hour of credit. 
W.E. Nelson T 2-4:40 Spring 



III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

CTS CH-454 
Augustine 

A study of some of the major writings of Augustine 
o( Hippo in the context of his own time and as a 
formative influence on Western thought. 
Bass W 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 13-602 
Augustine 

The life and theology of Augustine according to his 

writings and his times. 

Groh M 1:30-4:20 Spring 

G-ETS 13-606 

History of Christian Thought 

(For course description, see Winter.) 

Rogers TTh 3:30-5 (B) Spring 



G-ETS 13-610 

Spener and Pietism's Efforts at Church Renewal 

A survey of Spener 's life and work as an introduc- 
tion to classical Pietism's contribution to church 
renewal and mission. 
Stein WF 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTCH-510 
The Cappadocians 

This seminar will consider the formative contribu- 
tions of Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nazianzus, 
and Gregory of Nyssa in systematizing critical doc- 
trines in the life of the early church: revelation and 
divine immanence, Trinity, Christology, relation 
of spirit and matter, Imago Dei, authority of Scrip- 
ture, tradition, and councils in the life of the 
church. 
Tobias TTh 11-12:15 Spring 

NBTS C-449 

Schleiermacher & Kierkegaard: 

Subjectivity in Theology 

This course will take up the comparison, contrast 
and assessment of these two figures in terms of the 
relation between subjectivism and believing faith 
on the one hand, and theological formulation and 
reflection on the other. Attention will be given to 
contemporary aspects of these relations. 
Sharp M 9:30-12:10 Spring 



IV. AMERICAN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

BTS H-342 

History of Christianity in America 

Studies in the course of Christianity in North 
America from colonial times to the present, with 
emphasis upon source readings. 
Durnbaugh TTh 11-12:20 Spring 

LSTC H-350B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A course focusing on Lutheranism in America, 
especially on the problem of unity and polariza- 
tion. The historical development is viewed against 
the broad background of Christianity in America. 
(An alternative to H-350A.) 
Scherer MWF 9-9:50 Spring 

MTS H-406 

The American Presbyterian and Reformed 
Churches as Understood Through the Issues 
Facing General Assembly 

A historical survey of the major Presbyterian and 



80 



Historical Studies 



Reformed bodies, with special attention to the in- 
stitutional and theological history of the 
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Students may at- 
tend the 1986 General Assembly and make their 
special project a report on an issue facing that 
Assembly. 
Dudley /Schafer TTh 10-11:50 Spring 

MTS H-442 

Liberal Theology in America Since 

the Civil War 

Special attention will be given to evangelical 
liberalism, the social gospel, and modernistic 
liberalism. The present status of theological 
liberalism will be considered in the light of 
twentieth-century critiques. 
Schafer T 7-9:50 pm Spring 

TEDS CH 875 

Seminar: History of Evangelicalism and 

Fundamentalism 

An analysis of the history of Fundamentalism and 
Evangelicalism with particular reference to recent 
interpretations of these movements. Emphasis will 
also be placed on the question of Evangelical self- 
identity. 
Woodbridge TBA Spring 



V. SELECT TOPICS IN CHURCH 
HISTORY 

BTS H-348 

Evangelism and Church Growth 

The church growth movement will be examined in 
the context of the theology of evangelism, mis- 
sionological trends, positive and negative critiques, 
and dialogue with grass roots church growth activi- 
ty- 
Mundey 



TBA 



Spring 



BTS 1-545 

The Sociology of the Early Church 

A study of the beginnings of the Christian church 
by examining paintings and symbols from early 
sites of worship, meeting, and burial. Such 
evidence will be compared to written sources to 
reconstruct the story of the growth of early Chris- 
tianity. 
Snyder WF 10:40-12 Spring 

CTU H-429 

Church Growth among Marginal Communities 

A case study of mass conversion of marginal com- 
munities in India in the nineteenth and early twen- 



tieth centuries. The relation of missionaries to the 
caste system, reasons for mass conversions among 
outcastes and slaves, and relations to the govern- 
ment will be studied. 
Kanjamala MW 1 1:30-12:45 Spring 

G-ETS 13-644 

Oral History Seminar 

Introduction to the theory and methods of doing 
oral historical research, guidance in carrying 
through a specific oral history project. Prereq: 
13-501 or 502 or 503. 
Murphy MW 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTC H-540 

The Age of Pietism: Spener, Francke, 

Zinzendorf 

Focusing on the formative figures of the age, the 
course traces the rise of continental Pietism as a 
theological and practical reform movement, along 
with its varied contributions and its relationships 
with parallel movements elsewhere. Fruits of Pietist 
missions in America (Muhlenberg) and India 
(Ziegenbalg) are also examined. 
Scherer T 2:30-5 Spring 

NPTS H/T120 

The Ecumenical Movement: Past, Present 

and Future 

This course centers on the main features of 
ecumenical history from the time of the Reforma- 
tion, with special emphasis on the nineteenth and 
twentieth centuries. To be discussed are the leaders 
of the ecumenical movement, its significant events, 
its challenges and controversies. 
Engstrom T 7-10 pm Spring 

NBTS C-546 
The Christian Life 

An inquiry into some of the foremost Protestant 
perspectives on the Christian life from reflection 
and experience, with the expectation that an ex- 
amination, comparison, and evaluation of these 
perspectives will strengthen and enrich the 
student's own Christian life. 
Ohlmann WF 10:40-12 Spring 

TEDS NT 631 
Women and the Church 

A survey of the role of women and the attitudes 
toward women in the history of Christianity from 
the New Testament period to the present, with an 
emphasis on the apostolic church. 
Tucker TBA Spring 




81 



Theological Studies 

THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 

FOUNDATIONAL 

BTST-351 

Christian Faith and Thought 

A study of Christian faith and thought in its 
historical development. Following a brief overview 
of the church's interaction with cultural understand- 
ing through the earlier years, primary attention is 
given to the impact of the Enlightenment and some 
major types of contemporary response. 
Groff/Frantz TTh 8-9:20 Spring 



G-ETS 21-501 
Systematic Theology I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Young TTh 3:30-5 



Spring 



LSTCT-313 
Christian Theology III 

For description of the Christian Theology se- 
quence, see LSTC Christian Theology I. The third 
course in the sequence deals with the Holy Spirit, 
the Church, the Means of Grace, the Christian 
Life, and Eschatology. 

Bertram WF 11-12:15 Spring 

Hefner TTh 1142:15 Spring 

NFTS T100 
Introduction to Theology 

Students will be given an introduction to 
theological methodology, to 19th and 20th century 
theology, and to the range of theological expression 
available (film, literature, etc.). 
Johnston MTh 1-3 Spring 

NPTS T133a 
Systematic Theology III 

The ground of Jesus Christ, the hope of the world, 
is the holy trinity which is also the ground for 
understanding the human being as creature and 
the world as creation. 
Weborg MTWTh 8-9:15 Spring 

NBTS C-350 
Philosophy of Religion 

This course, understood as preliminary to 
systematic theology, is an examination of the 
reasonableness of belief in God, the occurrence of 
evil, the possibility of miracles, the nature of 
religious language and the relationship of faith to 
reason. Recommended for students who have not 
had at least one course in philosophy. 
Cosgrove T 7-9:40 pm Spring 



NBTS C-355 

Christian Theology III: Christian Life, 

Community and God 

This course is a continuation of C-354 exploring 
anthropology, justification and sanctification, and 
ecclesiology. Finally, the nature of God (as Person 
and Trinity) is elucidated by drawing together the 
material of both courses regarding God's revelation 
and historical activity. Prereq. C-354 or permission 
of the instructor. 
Finger TTh 11-12:20 Spring 

S-WTS 05-503S 
Sin and Redemption 

The nature of faith and theology and the relation 
between Scripture and tradition are examined. The 
biblical and patristic views of humanhood become 
the background for studying the problem of sin 
and grace, the doctrine of justification through 
faith, and theories of the atonement. 
Crum TBA Spring 

S-WTS 05-6 13S 
Fundamental Theology II 

A continuation of Fundamental Theology I utiliz- 
ing the same approach to examine ecclesiology 
(Church and sacraments) and the problem of God. 
Readings in Ricoeur, Kueng, Grainger, Barfield, 
and others. Note: Fundamental Theology I is not a 
prerequisite for this course. Limit: 30. 
Stevenson TBA Spring 



II. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS OR TRADITIONS 

LSTC H-435 
Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the stu- 
dent to Luther's theology in its broad comprehen- 
siveness and its dynamic thrust. Selected works in 
various categories are discussed in class. The stu- 
dent reads other works of his or her own choosing 
and prepares a term paper. 
Fischer MW 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC T-606 

Theology of Wolfhart Pannenberg 

Using a combination of lectures and seminar 
papers, this course will concentrate on the basic 
principles of Pannenberg as a comprehensive 
systematic thinker. Prereq: T-3 11-313 or equiv. 
(For post-M.Div. students; admission of others by 
consent of instructor.) 
Braaten MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 



82 



Theological Studies 



MTS T-414 

Studies in Reformed Theology 

A theological exploration of the distinctive 
character of Reformed theology. Emphasis upon 
understanding "thinking within a tradition." In- 
cludes study of selected writings and confessional 
documents. Special attention to the Confession of 
1967, to determine whether it is a Reformed docu- 



ment. 
Burkhart 



MW 10-11:50 



Spring 



MTS T-420 

Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr 

A study of the major writings of Reinhold 
Niebuhr. Special attention will be given to an 
evaluation of his theological method, the sources of 
his thought, and his attempt to do theology in the 
public realm. 
Burkhart T 1-4 Spring 

M/L TS-322 

Literature for Liberal Religion 

An examination of the methodological issues raised 
by efforts to create a "classical literature" for liberal 
religion in the context of the reading of selected 
non-biblical texts. 

Engel/ Staff TBA Spring 

NPTS T275 

Living Issues in Covenant Life and Theology 

A seminar that engages in an in-depth study of 
several of the living issues now confronting the 
Evangelical Covenant Church. These areas will 
form the focus of the course: doctrine, liturgy, poli- 
ty, and social ethics. 
G. Anderson /P. Anderson Th7-10pm Spring 

NPTS H/T135 
Theology of Luther 

This seminar examines through reading, research 
and discussion the selected treatises of Luther with 
particular reference to major doctrinal themes of 
the Reformation set in their historical contexts. 
P. Anderson M 2-5 Spring 

NBTS C-555 

Doctrine of Reconciliation in the Theology 

of Karl Barth 

This seminar will consist of a close reading of one 
or two volumes of the Church Dogmatics. 
Volumes and precise topics will vary from year to 
year, but themes of Christology and the doctrine of 
reconciliation will be a special and recurring 



theme. Prereq: Basic theology sequence or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 
Dayton W 7-9:40 pm Spring 

S-WTS 05-625S 

Study of a Theologian: E. Schillebeeckx 

A critical and integrative appropriation of 
Schillebeeckx's full theological position as that is 
expressed in Jesus: An Experiment in Christology and 
Christ: The Experience of Jesus as Lord, with par- 
ticular attention to the themes of history, 
hermeneutics, Christology, grace, and the life of 
redemption. Some lectures but mostly carefully 
constructed colloquia. 
Stevenson TBA Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN THEOLOGY 

BTS T-441 

Issues in Ecclesiology 

This course on the doctrine of the church will deal 
with fundamental issues which emerge in areas of 
comparative and constructive ecclesiology, current 
trends, a theology of ministry and ordination, and 
the mission of the church. 
Brown W 7-9:45 pm Spring 

CTU T-435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning 
human origins, the world and evil; a correlative in- 
vestigation of finality and eschatological sym- 
bolism. 
Hayes MW 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU T-436 

Origins and Ends in Mythical Consciousness 

An exploration of the symbolization process of 
origins, the problem of evil, death and the collec- 
tive endtime in Christian and other selected 
religious traditions. 
Bevans TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

CTU T-446 

The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

In the light of the contemporary questioning of 
"the missions," this course will try to determine 
why the Church by her very nature must be mis- 
sionary, what this mission means, how "necessary" 
it is in the plan of salvation, and how it is to be car- 
ried out in our modern, post-colonial world. 
Phelps TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 



83 



Theological Studies 



CTUT-541 

Christology in an Age of the World Church 

This is intended as a seminar for students who have 
already done a basic course in Christology. Topics 
will include: normative or non-normative 
Christologies; Christian universalism and world- 
religions; anthropology and Christology. These 
will be discussed in the light of contemporary 
authors and the experience of the Church in 
various cultural contexts. Prereq: T-440 or equiv. 
Hayes MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

CTS TEC-495 
Women in Crisis 

Crises in women's lives with particular attention to 
issues of violence. Combined historical and 
cultural background, socio-economic analysis, 
practical experience and models of decision mak- 
ing. Enrollment limited to 20. 
Thistle thwaite M 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 21-602 

Process Philosophy and Theology 

Process philosophy as a reformation of traditional 
Christian understandings of God, persons, and 
world; and the use of process perspectives and 
categories to do theology. With consideration of 
Whitehead, Teilhard, Hartshorne, Ogden, Cobb, 
Pittenger, and Williams. 
Will WF 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 21-635 

African Theology: Tradition and Liberation 

An investigation of traditional African religions 

and beliefs, with emphasis on theological motifs. 

Exploration of the influence of African theology on 

a theology of liberation. Special emphasis on 

writings of selected African and American 

theologians. 

Young TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 21-643 

Contemporary Jewish Life and Thought 

An analysis of the major theological currents in 
modern Judaism and their relationship to general 
philosophy and theology. History of the Jewish 
communities, their institutions, and problems, in 
the last two hundred years. Examination of the 
religious structure of the contemporary Jewish 
community. Vi unit. 
Schaalman M 5:30-7:20 pm Spring 



LSTC T-430 

Black Theology and the Black Church 

An analytical survey of the Black experience in the 
United States, theologically correlated with 
historical, psychological, and sociological factors. 
Special attention to the critical construction of a 
coherent expression of the Christian reality so that 
it redemptively engages the world of cultures. 
Pero TF 1-2:15 Spring 

LSTC M-453 
Christianity and Comedy 

What constitutes a comic vision of life, and what 
does that vision contribute to our Christian in- 
telligence and sensibility? Responses to these ques- 
tions are the focus of this seminar. Readings chiefly 
in fictional works of comedy plus critical essays. 
Niedenthal T 2:30-5 Spring 

LSTC T-530 

Theology as Confession and as Academic 

Discipline 

An examination of modern cases of Christian con- 
fession in situations of oppression in Europe, the 
Americas, Africa, and Asia, with an eye to how 
theological truth is thus advanced and verified, by 
comparison with the academic tradition of 
theology as "science." Readings in sources from 
modern confessors as well as in current 
methodologies (Tracy, Ricoeur, Habermas, Pan- 
nenberg, etc.). 
Bertram W 7-10 pm Spring 

LSTC T-672 

Religion and Science Seminar 

This annual seminar includes both faculty and 
students and deals each year with a specific field 
within the field of religion and science. Interested 
persons should contact Prof. Hefner for details. 
(For post-M.Div. students; admission of others by 
consent of instructor.) 
Hefner /Burhoe T 7-10 pm Spring 

MTS T-404 
Doctrine of Christ 

Considers the doctrine of the person and work of 
Jesus Christ as the basis for Christian faith in God. 
Particular attention will be given to the problems of 
the uniqueness and the universality of Jesus Christ 
vis-a-vis other bases of faith. 
Parker MW 10-11:50 Spring 



84 



Theological Studies 



MTS T-437/LSTC T-456 

Liberation Theology: Comparative Perspectives 

A critical exploration of the ways in which 
theologians of liberation have reinterpreted and 
redefined the traditional soteriological concepts 
such as sin and redemption, by analysing, compar- 
ing, and contrasting the various pictures of human 
liberation (salvation) which are drawn by Latin 
American, Black, and Feminist theologians. 
Maimela T 2:30-5 Spring 

NPTS M175 

Theological Bibliography and 

Research Methods 

The goals of this course are to introduce the 
reference tools of theological bibliography and to 
enable the student to develop appropriate research 
strategies for thesis research on a master's level. 
Goertzen M 3:15-5 Spring 

NBTS 1-400 

Eve in Bible, Theology and Culture 

(For course description, see Old Testament III.) 
Mom's Th 7-9:40 pm Spring 

S-WTS 06-680S 

Classics of English Spirituality 

A seminar in the interpretation of major figures of 
the English spiritual tradition such as Julian of 
Norwich, Augustine Baker, William Law, John 
Wesley, Evelyn Underhill, and C. S. Lewis. Martin 
Thornton's notion of an "effective-speculative syn- 
thesis" is examined. 
Crum TBA Spring 



IV. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTI Seminar (=NPTS T351, SML H-454, 

TEDS PT 875) 

Prayer and Life in the Spirit 

This course is designed to provide both students 
and professors with an opportunity to explore, 
through study and applied experience, the roots 
and the historical development of theological 
presuppositions underlying spiritual traditions in 
Christianity. Meets at various locations. Enroll- 
ment limited. 
Cunningham /Weborg TBA Spring 

CTU H-412 
Patristic Spirituality 

A thematic and historical study of the developing 
practice and theory of the spiritual life of the early 



church. It will center on the religious experience of 
the early Christians in both the East and West, 
especially as expressed in their writings on martyr- 
dom, asceticism, prayer, mysticism, and 
monasticism. Prereq: H-300 or equiv. 
Chirovsky MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTU H-493 

History of Christian Spirituality: 

XVIILXX Centuries 

A survey of the development of Christian 
spirituality from the seventeenth century onward, 
with special emphasis on the nineteenth and twen- 
tieth century. Particular emphasis given to the 
spirituality underlying the foundation of many 
religious communities in that period, and the 
origins of the liturgical, biblical and lay movements 
which prepared the way for Vatican II and contem- 
porary understandings of spirituality. 
Lozano TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTUH-491 

Women Mystics from Hildegarde to Julian 

of Norwich (XII-XV Centuries) 

An exploration of the contributions of women to 
the development of Christian spirituality in the 
Middle Ages: Hildegarde, Elizabeth of Schonau, 
the Beguine movement, Beatrice o{ Nazareth and 
Hadewijch. Catherine of Siena, Bridget of Sweden, 
the Rhenish school, and Julian of Norwich. Im- 
plications for women's ministry will also be address- 
ed. 
Lozano TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

LSTC M-480 

Silence and Speech: The Dialectics of 

Spirituality 

This course examines the relationship between 
speech and silence in the theology of the Word, 
beginning from Biblical silences through the 
rhythm of daily prayer and into the lives of the 
faithful. The phenomena of speech and silence will 
be studied in depth to understand how they inspire 
religious imagination. Prereq: LSTC M-380 or 
equiv. 
Rochelle MWF 8-8:50 Spring 

NBTS M-397 

Personality Types and Christian Meditation 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint the in- 
dividual with the phenomenon of meditation and 
contemplation through the perspective of per- 
sonality typology. The course will major on the 
more experiential dimensions and minor on the 




85 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



cognitive elements. Each session will include both 

experiential and didactic exercises. 

B. Edwards /H. Edwards W 7-9:40 pm Spring 

SMLM-412(Sp), S-412 

Mary and the Saints in Christian Theology 

and Spirituality 

The course will study the doctrinal, historical, 
systematic and formation aspects of Mary, Mother 
of the Lord, and other saints of the Christian tradi- 
tion. The course aims for a theoretical and prac- 
tical appreciation of the experience of living in the 
communio sanctorum. 
Cameli TTh TBA Spring 

SCJT-471 

Hide and Seek: An Introduction to 

Jewish Spirituality 

Jewish spirituality focuses on the hidden and the 
revealed, the distance and the intimacy, the in- 
itiative and the response that characterize the 
divine-human relationship. In the context of this 
polarity, this course treats issues such as revelation, 
worship, the Jewish mystical experience, sacred 
study, prayer and ethics, using Scriptural and post- 
biblical Jewish sources and resources. Meets at 
CTU. 
Sherwin T 7-9:30 Spring 



CTU E-370 

Christian Ethics: Language of a Community 

Christian ethics describes a community's pursuit of 
a life, a sharing in which values important to that 
community are displayed and embodied. This in- 
troductory course will consider the relationship of 
Christ to morality, the centrality of the virtues, the 
natural law tradition, and other themes important 
to contemporary Catholic morality. 
Wadell MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 



CTU E-374 

On Being a Christian in the World 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Fomasari MW 11 -30- 12:45 



Spring 



G-ETS 22-633 

Religious Issues in American Film 

Examinations o{ classic American films in their 
cultural, historical and religious contexts. Em- 
phasis on applying theological assessments to 
discover what has been happening in American 
culture and films. 
Forshey TTh 3:30-5 Spring 



G-ETS 21/22-503 
Theological Ethics 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Will MW 3:30-5 



Spring 



ETHICAL STUDIES 
L MORAL THEOLOGY 

BTS E-352 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

An examination of the basic concepts and tradi- 
tions in Christian ethics. The relation of ethical 
questions to theological teaching and to changing 
attitudes will be explored. Such topics as the rela- 
tionship of love and justice, principles and context, 
Christ and culture will be considered. 
Miller TTh 9:30-10:50 Spring 

BTS T-358 

Contemporary Pacifist Issues 

Historic attitudes of Christians toward war and 
peace will be studied; contemporary issues in 
violence and nonviolence will be examined; cri- 
tiques, definitions, biblical pericopes, and contem- 
porary theologians will contribute to formulations 
of a theology of peacemaking. Course includes trip 
to seminar in Washington, D.C. 
Brown WF 8-9:20 Spring 



MTSE-318 

Ethics II: Moral Issues 

An examination of various substantive moral pro- 
blems in the light of different theological and 
philosophical principles and methodological pro- 
cedures. Among the possible topics for considera- 
tion: abortion, racism and sexism, poverty, sexual 
morality, punishment, civil disobedience, suicide, 
lying. This course is complementary to MTS E-3 1 3. 
Garcia F 9-11:50 Spring 

SMLM-211 

Christian Principles of Moral Theology 

This course is an introduction to Catholic Moral 
Theology. Scripture, tradition (magisterium of the 
Church) and natural reason are studied in light of 
moral decision making. Christ is the paradigm of 
human action. The believer is challenged to live 
the faith. Various methodologies are examined. 
Boyle TTh 9:55-11:15 Spring 

Boyle TTh 1:15-2:35 Spring 

SML M-358 

Spiritual Direction - II 

Through the use of taped interviews, which will be 



86 



Ethical Studies 



heard and processed in a small group setting, 
students will continue to develop skills in the art of 
spiritual directions. Prereq: M-356 and M-405. 
Limit: 4. 
Cameli T TBA Spring 

S-WTS 08-504S 

Foundations for the Moral Life 

An introduction to the foundations for a 
theological ethic. The course will focus on Chris- 
tian faith in relation to the moral life, practical 
moral reasoning, and the church as a moral com- 
munity. 
Sedgwick TBA Spring 



II. SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

BTS E-369 

Peace Studies Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Roop T 3:10-4:40 Spring 

CTUE-491 
Conscience and Politics 

The course will explore the nature and foundations 
of political life understood as the life of and in the 
human community, assessing the place and role of 
conscience. Conscience will be related to social and 
historical consciousness and to their embodiments, 
tradition and community and to the specific unity 
to theory and practice that is constitutive of 
political conscience and praxis. 
Fomasari TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTS TEC-450 

The Voluntary Church and the American 

Experience 

A seminar devoted to a consideration of voluntary 
associations in general and the voluntary church in 
particular in the context of the American ex- 
perience. Historical, sociological, philosophical, 
and theological resources will be used to illumine 
the special character of the voluntary church in 
America. 
Schroeder W 2-5 Spring 

CTS TEC-456 

Empirical Studies in American Religion 

Examination of representative empirical studies of 
American Religion and their relevance to contem- 
porary religious institutions. Sociological theories 
and methods as well as theological assumptions 



underlying these studies will be analyzed and 

discussed. 

Fukuyama T 2-5 Spring 

G-ETS 22-504 

Church and Community 

Analysis of local churches' interaction with their 
communities in city, suburb, and small town as a 
basis for ministry in evangelism, counseling, social 
service, and action for social change. Theological 
options, use of social theory and data, case studies 
of effective ministry, and exploration of racism, the 
role of women, and peace action in the local com- 
munity. 
Tholin MW 3:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 22-505 

Christianity and American Culture 

Historical and systematic exploration of the rela- 
tionship between Christ and culture in its in- 
fluence on the nature of the church, especially in 
America, the church's witness for social change, 
the character of American civil religion, the roles 
of men and women in the family and at work, and 
of ministries in relation to these issues. 
Keller TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

LSTC M-370 

Ministry in Church and Society 

The role of the church vis-a-vis society is to work 
toward the realization of social justice. 
Understandings, strategies, and concrete models 
for engendering this in the local parish will be the 
focus of this course. 
Bloomquist TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

LSTC M-474 

Community Resources for Social Ministry 

Community and parish analysis, using field 
research techniques; identification and cataloging 
of resources for ministry (with a focus on social ser- 
vice agencies); designing of a proposal for how such 
resources can be employed in the service of the 
Gospel. 
Deppe/Ellor T 2:30-5 Spring 

M/L E-492 
Environmental Ethics 

An introduction to the leading positions and con- 
temporary literature in environmental ethics, with 
special attention to the relation of social and en- 
vironmental justice, and the challenge of the 
World Conservation Strategy. 
Engel TBA Spring 



87 



Ethical Studies 



NPTS T222 

The Church's Peace Ministry 

The key issues, documents, and writers on peace 
questions will be considered, with particular atten- 
tion to the ministries of congregations. 
Nelson W 7-10 pm Spring 

NBTS C-357 
Church and Society 

This course considers theological presuppositions 
about the relation-tension o{ Christian-world and 
Church-society and analyzes the United States' 
socio-economic-political-cultural situation as a 
reality in conflict. Students engage in a contem- 
porary reading of the Bible from this perspective in 
order to develop paradigms for the Church's life 
and Mission. 
Mottesi Th 8-9:20 and 11-12:20 Spring 

NBTS C-559 

Christian Faith and Marxism: 

A Mutual Challenge 

A comparative analysis of the roots of thought, the 
historic origin and developments, and the key con- 
cepts of both traditions. Particular attention will be 
given to revolutionary Christian movements and 
the Marxist critique of religion in their contem- 
porary mutual challenges, as well as factual ex- 
periences of renewal and enrichment. 
Mottesi T 6-8:40 pm Spring 



III. SELECT TOPICS 
IN ETHICS 

CTU E-482 
Medical Ethics 

A study of the relation of general ethical principles 
and methods to the concerns o{ the medical profes- 
sion. Among topics treated will be abortion, stan- 
dards for determining human death, experimenta- 
tion with human subjects, genetic engineering, ac- 
cess to health care, and the interrelationships 
among the rights of patients, of doctors, and of 
society. 
Nairn MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU E-535 

Freedom and Moral Theology 

An investigation into the role of freedom in con- 
temporary moral theology. Areas of concentration 
will include scripture, tradition, modern and con- 
temporary philosophy, and current theology. Of 
central importance will be the notion of fundamen- 
tal option. 
Nairn T 1-3:30 Spring 



CTU E-557 

The Social Responsibility of the Church 

This course will explore the relationship between 
the Church and society through the question of 
how the Church should understand its respon- 
sibility towards society, and how this concern has 
been addressed through the writings of Rauschen- 
busch, Reinhold Niebuhr, John Howard Yoder 
and others. 
Wadell MW 1-2:15 Spring 

CTU E-584 

Moral Issues in Economics and Business 

The relationship between Christianity and the 
origins of modern captalism; a Christian critique of 
capitalism; the Corporate Responsibility move- 
ment; international economic issues; ethics in 
business. 
Pawlikowski TTh 10-11:15 Spring 

NPTS T220 

Christian Ethics and the Church 

Several contemporary moral issues are considered 
from the perspective of biblical theological 
guidelines. The role of the congregation and other 
church structures as a major focus. 
Nelson MTWTh 8-9:15 Spring 

NBTS C-458d 
Issues in Social Ethics 

This seminar-style class will focus on a single issue 
each year and probe it from various angles 
(biblical, historical, theological, social scentific or 
appropriate). The emphasis will be on method. The 
class may be taken more than once because of the 
rotation of topics. 
Dayton Th 7-9:40 pm Spring 

S-WTS 13-608 
Women in Ministry 

This course will meet once a week for an extended 
period of time to discuss major issues confronting 
women. Special attention will be given to questions 
of identity and priesthood focusing on the ex- 
perience and consciousness of women. Readings 
from feminist literature will be combined with 
some discussions with women from outside the 
seminary. Limit: 15. 
Sedgwick /Garvey TBA Spring 

TEDS PR 816 
Ethical Theory 

An analysis of the principal theories and problems 

of philosophical ethics. 

Hackett TBA Spring 



88 



Ethical Studies 



World Mission Studies 



UA-462 

Urban Academy Seminar: Community 

Economic Development 

Orientation to the theory and practice of com- 
munity economic development is provided as well 
as a practicum in small business development for 
church organizations. Site visits included. Meets at 
ICUIS. 
Schaper W 3-5 Spring 



WORLD MISSIONLSTUDIES 

CTU T-402 
Classical Hinduism 

A study of the sacred books of the Hindus (Vedas); 
the speculative writings (Upanisads); the Ultimate 
Reality (the unknowable God); Popular Hinduism — 
gods, deities, festivals; Hindu ethics (Dharma and 
ashrams); Hindu sacramental system; Hindu rituals 
and worship; sin and reincarnation; Yoga; 
Spirituality of contemplation, devotion and action 
according to Bhagavad Gita. 
Kanjamala MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

CTU W-546 

African Traditional Religion 

Contextualization.or the incarnation of the Gospel 
in cultures, is crucial to evangelization; yet without 
an informed respect for local cultural forms, the mis- 
sionary is doomed to recapitulate the tired pater- 
nalism of an earlier age. This course explores tradi- 
tional religions as systems, looking for their 
coherence and rationale and resilience. 
Gittins MW 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTU W-446 

Initiatory Rites and Christian Initiation 

This seminar will make a comparative study of the 
nature, function and significance of initiatory rites 
in traditional religions and Christianity by study- 
ing the ritual of death and rebirth present in 
religious systems. African and Native American 
contextual local theologies will be used as case 
studies. 
Barbour T 7-9:30 pm Spring 



CTU W-497 

Mission Integration Seminar 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Barbour /Rabbipsi M 7-9:30 pm 



Spring 



CTU W-498 

World Mission Colloquium 

A seminar on select topics in mission. Interested 



persons gather in January to select topics, which 
are then announced prior to registration. Prereq: at 
least ten months of previous cross-cultural 
ministerial experience. 
Gittins M 2:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 13-661 
Theology of Mission 

The theological roots of mission for conversion ver- 
sus mission as social betterment and strengthening 
of other religions. 
Cason MTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTC W-433 

Indigenous Religion and Mission in North 

America: The Native American 

A study of the encounter of two religious visions: 
the Native American's response to the natural en- 
vironment and the Christian identification of the 
same environment as a promised land. 
Lindberg W 7-10 pm Spring 

MTS W-430 

Seminar on Eastern Orthodox Christianity 

A survey of the history of Eastern Orthodoxy from 

the Byzantine period with special attention to 

selected theological motifs and problems. Intensive 

course. 

Rigdon TBA Spring 

MTSW-431 

Traveling Seminar on Eastern Orthodox 

Christianity in the Middle East 

Travel for approximately three weeks to Egypt, 

Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Israel. Prereq: MTS 

W-430. 

Rigdon TBA Spring 

NPTS M152 

Mission Strategy and Methodology 

Church growth strategies, methods of evangeliza- 
tion and discipleship, theological education in the 
Third World, and missionary/national relation- 
ships are some of the topics considered. 
j.Reed/N.Reed MTh 2-3:50 Spring 

NBTS M-475 
Missiology 

This course introduces the Christian global mis- 
sion and the role of the Church and the individual 
in that mission. Students examine contemporary 
missiological issues from historical, theological, 
geographical and organizational perspectives; par- 
ticipate in a two-day area mission conference; ac- 
quire resources for a responsible local church mis- 



89 



World Mission Studies 



Ministry Studies 



sion strategy; and formulate a personal philosophy 

of mission. 

Bakke Th 7-9:40 pm Spring 

NBTS M-375a 
World Religions 

This course consists of an investigation of the main 
ideas from the world's major living religions, in- 
cluding Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, 
Taoism, Confucianism, Shintoism, and Primal 
Religions. They are examined from two perspec- 
tives: their own tradition's perspective and a Chris- 
tian perspective. 
Ellenbaum W 7-9:40 pm Spring 

TEDS ME 620 

Theology of Mission and Evangelism 

Theology oi mission in the Old and New 
Testaments with special attention to the operation 
of the Trinity; the missionary mandate, call, 
methods, and motives; and the problems of 
dialogue, syncretism, and universalism. 



Coleman 



TBA 



Spring 



TEDS ME 875A 
Liberation Theology 

An evaluation of the history and the presupposi- 
tions with its focus on the sociological and ec- 
clesiastical context. Seminal liberation thinkers 
will be studied such as Guiterrez, Segundo, Miran- 
da, Assman, Alves. The evaluation of liberation 
theology will search not only for refutation but for 
a Biblical response which combines truth, praxis, 
and compassion. 
Taylor TBA Spring 

TEDS ME 875B 
Women in Missions 

A survey of women in missions from the early 
church to the present, with an emphasis on con- 
temporary issues, problems, opportunities and mis- 
sion board distinctives. 
Tucker TBA Spring 



G-ETS 22-616 

Urban Church Ministry 

Theoretical frameworks for understanding ministry 

and mission in the urban context; the urban 

church facing social crisis; empowering the local 

congregation; inward and outward dimensions of 

caring; developing a purposive urban based 

ministry. 

Tholin T 7-9:50 pm Spring 

G-ETS 22/34-637 
Congregation as Community 

Examination of the congregation as a socio-cultural 
system. The organizing question: How can the ma- 
jor components of congregational life (e.g., 
fellowship, pastoral care, worship, education, 
outreach) be synergetically interrelated, upbuilding 
a holistic religious community ? (A local congrega- 
tion serves as learning laboratory.) 
Chesnut Th 7-9:50 pm Spring 

G-ETS 34-674 

Computers and Parish Ministry 

Ethical and theological issues in a computerized 
society. Practical experience in computer use for 
word processing, filing and information manage- 
ment, financial applications and communications. 
Evaluation of selected computer systems, including 
equipment and programs for churches. Limit: 10; 
Level II and III students only. Experimental course. 
Cason MW 5:30-7:20 Spring 

LSTCM-416H 

Hispanic Pastoral Dynamics (Dinamica 

Pastoral Hispanica) 

The realities of the Hispanic communities in the 
USA and their implications for ministry form the 
core of this course. It is an exploration of the pro- 
blems a minister encounters in the development of 
strategies for an effective ministry among 
Hispanics. Taught bilingually in Spanish and 
English. 
Navarro T 7-10 Spring 



MINISTRY STUDIES 

I. THE NATURE AND PRACTICE 

OF MINISTRY 

CTUM-510 

Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Szura TBA Fall /Winter /Spring 



LSTC M-419 

Contemporary Theologies of Ministry 

A survey of recent theological reflection about 
Christian ministry in the light of changes in church 
and society in the last twenty-five years. Study 
will include Kung, Schillebeeckx, Moltmann, and 
the documents of current ecumenical dialogues. 
Anderson TTh 11-12:15 Spring 



90 



Ministry Studies 



Past< 



Care 



MTS M-430 
Partnership in Ministry 

For men and women who want to explore together 
the origins of resistance to women in leadership 
positions in the church. This course will focus on 
the integration of theory and the practice of 
strategies for improving communication between 
men and women that will enhance their partner- 
ship in ministry. 
Allen/ Co ffman MW 8-9:50 Spring 

NPTS M268 
Parenting Churches 

Parenting Churches focuses on both home Bible 
studies and discipleship as two major complemen- 
tary strategies for church planting and church 
multiplication. 
J.Reed/N.Reed U7-10pm Spring 

NPTS Ml 72 

Sociology of Congregational Life 

An analysis of the major factors that affect and 
determine patterns o( belief and behavior within 
congregations. Students will do field study of local 
churches to test learnings. 
Carlson T 2-5 Spring 

NPTS M254 

Introduction to Church Planning 

An introductory exploration of the principles and 
practices of church planning. Topics to be con- 
sidered will be: how cities grow; churches and the 
comprehensive plan; and factors in locational 
criteria for churches. 
R. Larson W 2-5 Spring 

NBTS M-377H 

Hacia una Teologia Hispana de la 
Evangelizacion (Toward a Hispanic Theology 
of Evangelism) 

Consideracion de presupuestos biblico-teologicos 
de evangelizacion por medio de realidades fun- 
damentales tales como el Seriorfo de Cristo, el 
pecado de la humanidad, el amor santa de Dios, la 
obra del Espfritu, la dinamica y universalidad del 
kerygma y la importancia de la fe hecha 
discipulado. El contexto sera las situaciones 
hispanas de los EE.UU. y la America Latina. 
Alaniz W 6-8:40 pm Spring 



II. PASTORAL CARE 

BTS M-387 
Ministry to Families 

This course involves the study of theories of family 
formation, development, and difficulties as they 
shape individual personalities within the context of 
biblical theology. Students will interview families 
for practical experience and will learn beginning 
skills in changing family structures. 
Polk W 2:30-5:15 Spring 

CTU M-405 

Introduction to Basic Pastoral Counseling 

A basic introduction to the principles, methods, 
and techniques of pastoral counseling; 
characteristics of an effective counseling relation- 
ship; the initial interview and assessment; and use 
of referral. Considerable time is spent outside the 
class developing counseling skills and techniques 
by taping reality practice role play with peers and 
in evaluation sessions. Limit: 15. Audio-visual fee. 
McCarthy TTh 11:30-12:45 Spring 

CTS CM-330 

Personal Transformation 

The basic course dealing with the nature and 
dynamics of personal transformation approached 
both experientially and theoretically. The context 
and uniqueness of pastoral care and the nature of 
the caring church community will be explored. 
CTS priority. 
Moore MW 9:30-10:50 Spring 

CTS CM-432 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

The theory and practice of marriage and family 
counseling. Attention will be given to the growth 
and self-actualization of well-functioning marriages 
and families. 
Anderson W 6:30-9:30 pm Spring 

CTS CM-435 

Jungian Psychology and Contemporary 

Spirituality 

An investigation of the contribution of Jungian 
psychology to the theory and practice of 
postmodern spirituality. The course will include 
both theoretical and experiential components. 
Topics considered will include the role of the 
shadow, the influence of psychological typology, 
the experience of synchronicity, and the spiritual 
significance of dreams. 
Moore W 2-5 Spring 



Pastoral Care 



CTS CM-439 

Aging and the Human Spirit 

A study of the phenomenon of aging, interweaving 
biblical, historical, and theological perspectives in 
relation to social scientific studies with a view to 
discerning their practical implications for church 
and ministry. 
LeFevre T 6:30-9:30 pm Spring 

CTS CM-472 

House Church Leadership Intensive 

Experiencing, theological reflection, and leadership 
skills training go hand in hand in this course, 
which utilizes and adapts the insights of Gestalt, 
Psychosynthesis, Bioenergetics, journal writing, 
fantasy, and meditation as pathways for personal 
growth and religious experiencing, and for 
revitalizing the church. Consent of instructor re- 
quired. 
Anderson 6/8-23 Intensive Spring 

G-ETS 32-602 

Pastoral Care of Women 

An examination of theology, issues, and attitudes 
related to the pastoral care of women with an aim 
of improving pastoral care. Prereq: 32-501. 
Justes TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 32-605 

Human Sexuality in the Context of 

Pastoral Care 

An examination of the place of human sexuality in 
self-fulfillment and self-understanding, especially in 
relation to the pastoral ministry of the church. 
Limit: 12. Prereq: 32-501, permission of the instruc- 
tor. 
Justes MW 3:30-5:20 Spring 

G-ETS 32-607 

Case Approach to Pastoral Care (Seminar) 

A group consultation with student presentation of 
pastoral care situations and pastoral incidents. 
(Students must be involved in some practice of 
ministry.) Limit: 10. Prereq: 32-501. 
Ashbrook TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 32-609 

The Working Brain and the Work of Theology 

The knowledge of the way the brain works neuro- 
psychological^ is used as an analytical metaphor to 
organize the human condition in historical and 
theological expressions. These are assessed as to 
adequate, deficient or disturbed functioning for the 



purpose of identifying ways to enhance fuller 
human functioning. A seminar. Limit: 16, Lev. II 
and III students. Prereq: 32-501. 
Ashbrook MTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

G-ETS 32-612 

Cultural Dynamics and Pastoral Ministry 

A study of the significance and impact of cultural 
dynamics of persons, groups, and socieities in rela- 
tion to the requirements for effective ministries of 
maintenance (care) and intervention (change). 
Review of the student's own cultural assumptions, 
world view, and value system in the light of 
cultural change and of the requirements for effec- 
tive ministry to persons and groups with other 
assumptions, world views, and value systems. 
Prereq: 32-501. 
Hinkle MW 3:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 32-633 

Pastoral Therapy with Groups 

The application of principles of group therapy to 
the practice of ministry. (32-632 is strongly recom- 
mended as a prerequisite for this course.) 
Hinkle T 7-9:50 pm Spring 

LSTC M-437 

Training the Laity for Pastoral Care 

This course equips students to initiate programs of 
lay ministry in pastoral care by: discerning the 
areas of need, application into organizational struc- 
ture, recruiting, training in basic skills and 
representative areas of need, and dynamics of 
ongoing supervisory relationships. Prereq: Intern- 
ship. 
Bauermeister MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

LSTC M-439 

Marriage and Family Enrichment 

Consideration of the theological, psychological, 
and sociological issues in marriage and family living 
is followed by an examination of dynamics and 
techniques relevant to various marriage and family 
enrichment models. The course concludes with a 
marriage enrichment and training workshop for 
class members and spouses. Prereq: LSTC M-320 
or equiv. 
Bauermeister W 7-9 pm Spring 

LSTC M-440 
Hospice Training 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Bauermeister /Staff TBA Spring 



92 



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Liturgy and Worship 



LSTCM-521 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

A course aimed at the preparation of the pastor for 
his or her predominant type of counseling, con- 
sidering theories and practices in present-day con- 
joint and family therapies, pre-marital education, 
divorce, sexuality, and the sociology of marriage. 
(Limited to M.Div. Seniors and D.Min. students.) 
Swanson F 8-12:15 Spring 

LSTC M-622 C and F 

Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Swanson F 1-2:30 Spring 

MTSM-311 
Pastoral Counseling 

This course introduces basic concepts and models 
for effective pastoral counseling. Areas covered in- 
clude initial assessment, establishing and maintain- 
ing the counseling relationship, crisis intervention 
and referral. Counseling techniques related to in- 
dividuals, couples, and families are considered. 
Video taping of simulated counseling sessions are 
used in the analysis of counseling procedures. 
Ashby TF 1-3 Spring 

MTSM-413 
Conflict Management 

This course will assist students in becoming aware 
of a conflict, diagnosing its nature, and using effec- 
tive problem-solving methods in its resolution. The 
course will focus on needs conflicts and values con- 
flicts. Case studies and role plays will be used to il- 
lumine theoretical understandings. 
Ashby 5/5-6/6, MW 2-5 Spring 

NBTS M-394 

Theories of Personality and Counseling 

Class members will examine and critique four 
theories of personality and the accompanying 
counseling techniques. Theorists studied will be: 
Freud, Jung, Skinner and Fromm. Classes will also 
include counseling exercises, case assessments and 
student presentations on a topic of their interest in 
personality theory. 
Tyson W 7-9:40 pm Spring 

NBTS M-496 
Marriage Enrichment 

This course explores the possibilities and problems 
in marriage enrichment. Issues such as intimacy, 
communication skills and personal growth will be 
examined. Couples will be encouraged to take part 



in exercises that will help them understand con- 
flicts and how to resolve them and the importance 
of openness in marriage. 

Taylor M 7-9:40 pm Spring 

S-WTS 16-5 US 

Case Seminar in Field Education 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Carlson TBA Spring 



III. LITURGY AND WORSHIP 
STUDIES 

CTU T-350A & B 

Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 

A course designed to help the entering student ex- 
plore key dimensions, forms, and principles of 
pastoral liturgy in the light of Vatican II. Explora- 
tion and reflection will be carried out through 
practicum exercises, lectures, readings, and study 
projects. Students are to participate in three lab 
sessions on dates to be announced at the beginning 
of the course. Lab fee. 

Hughes Sec. A: MW 10-1 1:15 Spring 

Keifer Sec. B: MW 1 1:30-12:45 Spring 

CTUT-351 

Basic Principles of Worship in Hispanic Context 

A course designed to help the entering student ex- 
plore key dimensions, forms, and principles of 
pastoral liturgy in the light of Vatican II, Medellin, 
and Puebla. The course will explore and reflect 
upon the Hispanic liturgical experience through 
reading, lectures, and a final creative project. Two 
tracks: for Spanish and non-Spanish speaking 
students. Lab fee. 
Perez T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTU T-458 

Liturgy and Sacraments in the 

Byzantine Tradition 

An introduction to Byzantine worship. The ethos 
of Byzantine worship is studied from the point of 
view o( clergy and faithful. Divine liturgy, office 
and holy mysteries (sacraments) are examined in 
their development and present practice. Includes 
visits to churches and A-V presentations. 
Chirovsky MW 2:30-3:45 Spring 

CTU T-561 

Liturgy and Spirituality 

This seminar will explore the structures, prayer 
forms, and rhythyms of liturgical celebration to 



93 



Liturgy and Worship 



draw out its foundations and implications for 

Christian spirituality and living. 

Ostdiek T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTU T-554 

Great Books in Liturgy and Preaching 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Huels/Staff M 7-9:30 pm Fall /Winter /Spring 

CTUM-516 
Leadership of Prayer 

A practicum course in the leadership of the com- 
munity's non-sacramental prayer, including the 
Liturgy of the Hours, rites of the catechumenate, 
wake and graveside services, penance services, ser- 
vices of the Word and eucharistic ministry to the 
sick. Students not anticipating ordination may 
satisfy competency requirements through this 
practicum. Audio-visual fee. 
Hughes M 7-9:30 pm Spring 

CTU M-520 
Liturgical Law 

The course establishes the nature and role of 
liturgical law, and describes the competent 
authorities for and sources of liturgical discipline. 
Particular emphasis is given to the acquisition of 
sound principles of interpreting liturgical law and 
their application in pastoral practice. 
Huels M 2:30-5 Spring 

CTUM-521 

Liturgical Music: Principles and Performance 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Foley T 3:30-5 Spring 

CTSCM-319 
Introduction to Hymnology 

The study of the rich heritage of Christian hymns 
and the recent explosion in hymnwriting in 
America and England. The latest in hymnal edi- 
tions and supplements. The use of hymns by the 
great composers in their choral works. How to lend 
excitement to congregational hymn singing; pro- 
ven ways to introduce new hymns in worship. 
Winfield TBA Spring 

G-ETS 13/31-617 

History of Christian Worship 

Examination of the development of Christian wor- 
ship from its Jewish background and New Testa- 
ment setting into the Greek Orthodox and Roman 
Catholic liturgies, and various Protestant liturgical 
forms. 
Stem MTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 



LSTC M-485 

Survey of Christian Hymnody 

Analysis of the Christian hymn as an expression of 
worship for the individual Christian and the cor- 
porate community. Survey of history and develop- 
ment of the hymn. Evaluation of appropriateness of 
texts, tunes, and harmonizations and of present 
trends in hymnody. Prereq: LSTC M-380 or equiv. 
Bangert TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

NPTSM113a 
Worshipping Community 

An examination of the worshipping experience of 

the congregation, including the history and 

theology of worship. The relationship of preaching 

and the sacraments to worship will be given special 

attention. 

Weborg MTh 10:15-11:30 Spring 

NBTS M-388 

Introduction to Christian Worship 

This course is an ecumenical study of the history, 
theology and practice of worship in the Church 
emphasizing the ecclesiological dynamics of the 
evangelical tradition and enabling students to be 
effective worship planners and leaders. 
TBA TTh 8-9:20 Spring 



SML MS-370 
Vocal Practicum I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Wojcik MWF 8:25-9:30 



SML MS-380 
Vocal Practicum II 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Wojcik TBA 



Spring 



Spring 



SML MS-375 

Congregational Music of Worship 

A study in theory and sound of the congregational 
music of worship. Analyzing traditional and con- 
temporary participation music. 
Wojcik TBA Spring 

S-WTS 09-608S 
The Liturgical Year 

The liturgical theology of festival and the develop- 
ment of Christian calendars and their effect on 
liturgical observance, with implication for contem- 
porary pastoral practice. 
Mitchell TBA Spring 



94 



Liturgy and Worship 



Preaching and Communication 



S-WTS 09-60 IS 

Practicum in Liturgical Celebration 

A practicum in the conduct of worship of the Book 
of Common Prayer in accordance with Anglican 
traditions. Attention will be paid to "presidential 
style" with an opportunity for students to critique 
themselves from videotaype and to participate in 
general class critiques. Limited to final-year 
students. 
Mitchell TBA Spring 

TEDS CE 871 
Religious Drama 

Theory, history and use of drama as a means of 
enriching the local church program of worship, 
education, and evangelism. The techniques of 
preparation and presentation are applied in actual 
dramatical performance. 
Andrews TBA Spring 



IV. PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

BTS M-377 

Communication and Reconciliation 

A survey of the role of communication in the 
resolution of conflict, with emphasis on the ap- 
plication of theory to ministry-related situations. 
Amett Weekend Intensive TBA Spring 

CTU M-450 A,B,C,D 

The Homily in the Sunday Assembly 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
Hang/Staff Sem. ABCD: M 8:30-9:45 Spring 
Lab. A: M 2:30-4:30 

B: W 2:30-4:30 

C: Th 1-3 

D: Th 3-5 

CTU M-552 

Advanced Practicum in Preaching 

Open to students who have taken a CTU-400 level 
or equivalent course in preaching, this practicum 
gives opportunities for refining and expanding 
preaching skills through self-critical analysis, peer 
evaluation and intensive personal guidelines from 
the instructor. Audio-visual fee. 
Hang W 7-9:30 pm Spring 

CTS CM-303 
Preaching 

The theology and practice of the preaching 
ministry. The approach will emphasize both the art 
of sermon preparation and the place of preaching 



in pastoral ministry. Limited to second and third 

year students. 

Edgerton M 6:30-9:30 pm Spring 

G-ETS 31-601 
Practice in Preaching 

Increasing mastery of the preaching ministry. Two 
or three sermons are preached before the class. 
(May be repeated for second quarter of credit.) 
Limit: 12. Prereq: 31-501. 
Campbell MW 5:30-7:20 pm Spring 

G-ETS 12/31-604 

Interpreting the New Testament 

Through Preaching 

Intensive study in and preaching from selected 
NT. passages. Exegesis of Greek or English texts. 
Presentation of sermons before the class. Prereq: 
31-501 and one foundational course in NT. Limit: 
12. Course may be used to satisfy the second re- 
quirement in preaching. 
Chatfield/Stegner TTh 9-10:50 Spring 

G-ETS 31-608 
Preaching from Genesis 

Special emphasis will be given to the material deal- 
ing with the creation, the fall, the tower of Babel 
and the flood and series preaching from Patriarchal 
cycles. In addition to classical exegesis, the course 
will introduce students to literature explaining and 
celebrating the story telling art of the ancients. 
(Counts for second preaching requirement.) Limit: 
12. 
Campbell MTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

LSTCM-551 
Preaching Seminar 

Sermon content analysis (biblical, theological and 
current issue) with eye toward suitability for a par- 
ticular audience; skill development employing a 
variety of preaching styles (proclamation, didactic, 
narrative, dramatic); sermon writing using case 
study for a particular occasion; preaching 
laboratory. Prereq: LSTC M-340 or equiv. 
Deppe/Bauermeister MW 8:30-9:45 Spring 

MTSM-316 

The Dynamics of Speech Communication 

This course helps each student to define his/her 
personal communication style. Students will give 
regular, in-class presentations to test and refine 
their skills. Analyzing and responding to in-class 
presentations will help students generate critical 
standards by which to guide future performances. 
Wilson F 1-4 Spring 



95 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



MTS M-509 

Advanced Seminar in Preaching 

A seminar course for students who have had MTS 
M-315 or its equivalent and substantial work in ex- 
egesis. The course will meet for five weeks. 
TBA TBA Spring 

NPTSM111 
Introduction to Homiletics 

The student will learn fundamentals of theology of 
preaching, principles of sermon construction, and 
practice these learnings in laboratory experience. 
Hjclm MTTh 8-9:15 Spring 

NPTS Ml 23a 

New Testament Preaching Lab 

This laboratory part of the course will be taken 

concurrently with B241, Interpreting the New 
Testament, from which resources for preaching will 
be drawn. 

Hcdstrom W 8:30-9:45 Spring 

Wiens Th 2-3:15 Spring 

Stenberg Th 3:30-4:45 Spring 

NPTS Ml 26a 
Senior Preaching II 

This lab correlates with Ml 13a, Worshipping 
Community, with focus on preaching in relation- 
ship to the entire worship service in the church 
year cycle. 
Hjelm TTh 11:40-12:55 Spring 

S-WTS 11-602S 
Practice in Preaching 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Edwards TBA Spring 

S-WTS 11-508S 

Use of the Voice in the Conduct 

of Public Worship II 

The advanced section will place its emphasis on 
music for the Eucharist, the Litany and other 
chanted intercessory prayers, the chanting of the 
Gospel, and lessons, and the music for Holy Week. 
A half hour each week will be spent with the in- 
structor in private work, in addition to the regular 
class. Vi? unit. Limit: 4. 
Petersen TBA Spring 



V. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

CTU M-463 

Holistic Parish Education 

(For course description, see Fall.) 

Lucinio T 1-3:30 Spring 

CTS CM-322 

The Churches' Teaching Ministry with Youth 

Offering a variety of distinct youth ministry 
models, this course emphasizes team and peer 
ministry, distinct leadership styles, getting in touch 
with one's own adolescence, developmentally based 
retreats, covenantal discipline and symbol making. 
Resources and issues of youth will be critical. 
Discussions with youth will highlight the course. 
M-vers 6/8-13 Intensive Spring 

CTS CM-324 

The Churches' Teaching Ministry with Adults 

Offering distinct adult education models and utiliz- 
ing a life-span framework, this team-taught course 
explores the dynamics of adult maturing and 
religious meanings of intimacy, power, generative 
care and integrity within a variety of teaching 
methodologies. Central to course are texts by 
McKenzie, Palmer, Whitehead and Whitehead. 
With Dr. Carol Munro. 
M-ver.s TBA Spring 

G-ETS 33-501 

Teaching and Learning in the Church 

The development of competence in teaching based 
on theories of learning and instruction, within 
theological perspective. Basic skill development in 
teaching. Limit: 25; open to Levels I, II, and III 
students (Level I priority). 
Simmons MW 5:30-7:20 pm Spring 

G-ETS 33-603 

Teaching and Supervision Skills for 

Christian Education 

The development of teaching and supervision skills 
through microteaching practice in the use of in- 
teraction analysis, and introduction to Instroteach. 
Limit: 12; Pass/Fail. 
Furnish MW 3:30-5 Spring 

G-ETS 33-610 

Educational Ministry with Children 

Issues that must be resolved as the church attempts 
to provide a ministry with children in a changing 
world; resources that will contribute to the resolu- 



96 



Educational Ministry 



tion of these issues. A developmental approach. 

Limit: 24. 

Furnish WF 940:50 Spring 

G-ETS 33-612 
Adult Life and Faith 

Primary literature in life-span psychology and 
readings from selected novels serve as the basis for 
a study of the development of faith in the adult 
years, and for appropriate Christian education. 
Simmons MTh 1:30-3:20 Spring 

G-ETS 33-625 

Formation and Transformation: Christian 

Education, Evangelism and Social Change 

A study of contrasting approaches to Christian for- 
mation and transformation — conversion, con- 
scientization, initiation, and enculturation — and 
the ministries of evangelism, education, and social 
transformation that enable persons and com- 
munities to develop Christian identity and 
character and become more fully human. Ex- 
amines methodologies of evangelism, nurture, in- 
terpersonal communication, confirmation educa- 
tion, and change agentry. (Prereq: 1 foundational 
course.) 
Wingeier TTh 3:30-5 Spring 

LSTC M-461 

Baptism, First Communion, and Confirmation 

A study of the biblical, historical, and doctrinal 
aspects of this ministry and its development in the 
church today. Emphasis will be placed on an in- 
depth study of curriculum, teaching methods, and 
programs for baptism, first communion, and confir- 
mation. 
Bozeman MW 11-12:15 Spring 

LSTC M-463 

Christian Education for Adults 

This course begins with a study of research on 
adult development and the implications for Chris- 
tian education. Curricular resources for meeting a 
wide variety of adult educational needs are examin- 
ed. 
Conrad TTh 1-2:15 Spring 

MTS M-319H 

Fundamentos y Principios de la Educacion 
Cristiana (Christian Education in the 
Hispanic Community) 

Curso en el que se presentan diversas bases de la 
Educacion Cristiana como teoria (fundamentos 
biblico-teologicos, psico-sociologicos, pedagogicos, 



etc.). Tambien se explora la articulacion de prin- 
cipios para la implementacion de la Educacion 
Cristiana en la Iglesia, a la luz de aquellas con- 
sideraciones fundamentales y en terminos del con- 
texto hispano. 
Schipani TBA Spring 

MTS M-439 
Models of Teaching 

Focusing on the teaching function of ministry, 
viewed in the context of educational theory and 
practice, this course will provide opportunities to 
examine and practice varieties oi methods for 
teaching/leading groups in the congregation. 
Caldwell TTh 8-9:50 Spring 

M/L M-305 

Religious Education for Ministers 

An introductory course emphasizing the 
knowledge and skills in religious education needed 
by parish ministers serving smaller churches. Par- 
ticular attention given to the development of 
theological understanding of the place and purpose 
of religious education, identifying human and cur- 
ricular resources, and balancing task orientation 
and people orientation in the management of 
religious education programs. 
Nelson TBA Spring 

M/L M-459/UA-462 

Urban Academy Seminar: Community 

Economic Development 

(For course description, see UA-462 in Ethical 

Studies III.) 

Schaper W 3-5 Spring 

NPTS M130 

Leadership for Educational Ministry 

The course is an examination of the professional 
nature of leadership in the church and in 
equipping of laity for leadership responsibilities. 
F. Anderson MTWTh 2-3 Spring 

NPTS M132 

Group Life in the Church 

The course involves a study of small group theory, 
theology, and practice through participation in a 
small group with both personal growth and task 
orientations. Applications are made to Bible study 
groups and to church boards and committees. 
F. Anderson MTTh 1 1 :40- 12:55 Spring 



97 



Educational Ministry 



Canon Law 



NPTS MHO 

Field Education Practicum I 

(For course description, see Fall.) 
F. Anderson TBA 



Spring 



NBTS M-481 

Ministering with Preschool Children and 

Their Parents 

Lab experiences with preschoolers will preface 

workshops led by instructors and students, dealing 

with topics of interest to the parents of 

preschoolers and to pastors and Christian 

educators who minister with the children and their 

families. 

Morris/Wilkie M9:30-12:10 Spring 

NBTS M-382 

Organization and Administration of 

Christian Education 

This course is a graduate seminar where students 
will research and discuss topics relating to manag- 
ing the church's educational program. Subjects for 
consideration include: evaluation, financial plan- 
ning, leadership development, management theory, 
planning, organizational models and professional 
growth. 
Jenkins TTh 11-12:20 Spring 



NBTS M-484bH 

Ministerio Educacional Juvenil 

en el Contexto Hispano II (Educational 

Ministry with Youth in Hispanic Contexts II) 

Este curso es una continuation de M-484aH. Los 
estudiantes se familiarizaran con las caracterfsticas 
de la juventud y maneras de ministrar con ellos. 
Planificaran actividades especificas tales como: (1) 
retiros de fin de semana, (2) seminarios sobre la 
juventud, (3) intrevistas con estuidiantes de la 
escuela secundaria, (4) presentaciones topicales 
sobre el ministerio con jovenes. 
Arauz Th 6-8:40 pm Spring 

TEDS CE 504 
Theological Foundations of 
Christian Education 

An examination of the biblical base and 
theological implications for developing a mature 
Christian education ministry. 
Sell TBA Spring 



VI. CANON LAW 

CTU M-422 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

(For course description, see Winter.) 
Huels MW 10-11:15 



Spring 



SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST WITHIN COURSES OF STUDY 



In this section abbreviated listings are given for courses in four special areas of interest 
in the theological curriculum. Full course descriptions are given in the section of course 
listings as specified. 

HISPANIC STUDIES 



CTU B-491 
CTU M-435 
MTSM-419H 
MTS T-439H 
MTS E-400 

NBTSB-316aH 
NBTS B-316bH 
NBTS M-395H 
NBTS M-390H 



CTU B-472 
CTU E-541 
CTU E-570 
CTU M-429 
CTU T-559 
MTS M-420H 



MTS H-486H 

NBTSB-311aH 
NBTS M-394H 
NBTS M-391H 
NBTS M-484aH 



FALL 

Liberation Hermeneutic and Socio-Historical Exegesis 

Religiosidad Popular 

Del Texto al Sermon 

Teologfa Protestante en el Contexto Hispano 

Social Ethics in Latin American Theologies of 

Liberation 
Griego del Nuevo Testamento I 
Griego del Nuevo Testamento II 
Fundamentos de Consejeria y Cuidado Pastftral ... 
Teologfa y Metodologia de la Communicacion ... 

WINTER 

The Bible in Liberation Theology since Puebla 
World Poverty, Development, Liberation 
Revolution and Liberation: Ethical Perspectives 
Psychological Aspects of Liberation and Justice 
Worship in Multi-Cultural Community 
Interpretacion Historico-social del Desarrollo de 

las Comunidades Puertoriquenas y Mexicanas en 

los Estados Unidos de Norte America 
Desarrollo del Protestantismo Hispano en los 

Estados Unidos 
Hebreo I 

Teorias de la Personalidad ... 
Metodologias y Practica de la Predicacion ... 
Ministerio Educacional Juvenil I ... 



New Testament III 
Ministry Studies III 
Ministry Studies IV 
Theological Studies I 

Ethical Studies 11 
New Testament IV 
New Testament IV 
Ministry Studies 11 
Ministry Studies IV 



New Testament III 
Ethical Studies 11 
Ethical Studies 11 
Ethical Studies 11 
Ministry Studies III 



Ministry Studies I 

Historical Studies 11 
Old Testament IV 
Ministry Studies 11 
Ministry Studies IV 
Ministry Studies V 



SPRING 
CTU T-351 Basic Principles of Worship in Hispanic Context 

LSTC M-416H Hispanic Pastoral Dynamics 

MTS T-437/LSTC T-456 

Liberation Theology: Comparative Perspectives 
MTS M-319H Fundamentos y Principios de la Educacion Cristiana 

NBTSB-311bH Hebreo II 

NBTS B-438aH Exegesis griego de Santiago 

NBTS M-377H Hacia una Teologfa Hispana de la Evangelizacion 

NBTS M-484bH Ministerio Educacional Juvenil II ... 

BLACK STUDIES 

FALL 
G-ETS 13-642 Sex and Race in American History 

LSTC T-434 Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

MTS E-406 Women, Race and Class 

NBTS C-345 History of the Black Church in America 



Ministry Studies III 
Ministry Studies 11 

Theological Studies III 
Ministry Studies V 
Old Testament IV 
New Testament IV 
Ministry Studies I 
Ministry Studies V 



Historical Studies V 
Theological Studies 11 
Ethical Studies III 
Historical Studies 11 



G-ETS 13-645 



WINTER 

Black Ministry: Confronting Historical Challenges 



Historical Studies V 



99 



G-ETS 22-611 Christian Ethics of Martin Luther King, Jr. and 

Reinhold Niebuhr 
G-ETS 22-614 Black Women and a Constructive Ethic 

LSTC T-469 Toward a Black Spirituality 

SPRING 
G-ETS 21-635 African Theology: Tradition and Liberation 

LSTC T-430 Black Theology and the Black Church 

MTS T-437/LSTC T-456 

Liberation Theology: Comparative Perspectives 



Ethical Studies III 
Ethical Studies III 

Theological Studies 11 

Theological Studies III 

Theological Studies III 

Theological Studies III 



JUDAIC STUDIES 

FALL 

CTU B-526 Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

CTU T-470/LSTC T-453 

Current Issues in Jewish-Christian Dialogue 
G-ETS 21-642 Judaism in the Early Christian Period 

NPTS B130 Jews, Christians and the Bible 

SCJ E-470 Spirituality in Action 



CTU B-529 
SCJ T-473 

G-ETS 21-644 
SCJ B-472 
SCJT-471 



G-ETS 21-636 
G-ETS 13-642 
MTS E-406 
NPTS B180 



CTSCH-310 
CTS TEC-491 
G-ETS 13/22-62! 
G-ETS 22-614 
LSTC E-535 



WINTER 

Jewish Mysticism and Messianism 
Encountering the Holocaust 

SPRING 

Contemporary Jewish Life and Literature 
Jewish Approaches to Hebrew Scriptures 
Hide and Seek: An Introduction to Jewish 
Spirituality 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 

FALL 

Feminist Theology: A Systematic Perspective 
Sex and Race in American History 
Women, Race and Class 
Women in Ministry 

WINTER 

Ruth, Esther and Other Heroines 

Women ck Religion: The Literary Imagination 

Church, Family and Gender Roles in Christianity 

Black Women and a Constructive Ethic 

Issues in Feminist Ethics 

SPRING 

Women Mystics from Hildegarde to Julian of Norwich 

Women in Crisis 

Pastoral Care of Women 

Human Sexuality in the Context of Pastoral Care 



CTU H-491 

CTS TEC-495 

G-ETS 32-602 

G-ETS 32-605 

MTS T-437/LSTC T-456 

Liberation Theology: Comparative Perspectives 
MTS M-430 Partnership in Ministry 

NBTS 1-400 Eve in Bible, Theology and Culture 

S-WTS 13-608 Women in Ministry 

TEDS NT 631 Women and the Church 

TEDS CE 875B Women in Missions 



New Testament III 

Theological Studies III 
Theological Studies 11 
Old Testament III 
Ethical Studies III 



Old Testament III 
Theological Studies III 

Theological Studies III 
Old Testament III 

Old Testament III 



Theological Studies III 
Historical Studies V 
Ethical Studies III 
New Testament III 



Old Testament 11 
Theological Studies I 
Historical Studies V 
Ethical Studies III 
Ethical Studies III 



Theological Studies IV 
Theological Studies III 
Ministry Studies 11 
Ministry Studies 11 

Theological Studies III 
Ministry Studies I 
Old Testament III 
Ethical Studies III 
Historical Studies V 
World Mission Studies 



100 



ACTS PERSONNEL 

FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 



Magdiel Alaniz (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

Bachillerato en Humanidades, Universidad 
Autonoma de Coahuila; Bachilleratro en Cien- 
cias and Licenciado en Ciencias de la Com- 
unicacion, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo 
Leon; M.A. (Th.S.), M.Div. cand., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Carol J. Allen (MTS) Assistant Professor of 
Ministry and Director of Field Based Programs 
B.A., Michigan State University; M.Div., Col- 
gate Rochester Divinity School; M.S.W., 
Tulane University, School of Social Work. 

C. Douglas Amidon (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

B.A., University of California at Los Angeles; 
M.Div., Trinity .Evangelical Divinity School. 

Delmar Anderson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Ministry 

B.A., Knox College; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Study: Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Frances M. Anderson (NPTS) Professor of Chris- 
tian Education 

B.S.N. , University of Nebraska; B.R.E., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.A., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett- 
Evangelical Seminary and Northwestern 
University. 

Glenn P. Anderson (NPTS) Professor of Church 
History 

A.B., University of California, Berkeley; B.D., 
S.T.M., Andover Newton Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Boston University; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Philip A. Anderson (CTS) Professor of Pastoral 
Theology 

B.A. Macalester College; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Edinburgh. 

Philip J. Anderson (NPTS) Assistant Professor 
of Church History 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; D.Phil., Regent's Park 
College, University of Oxford. 

Phyllis Anderson (LSTC) Director of Pastoral 
Studies 



B.A., Sacramento State College; M.Div., Wart- 
burg Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Aquinas In- 
stitute. Study at Durham University. 

Leslie A. Andrews (TEDS) Visiting Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Christian Education 
B.A., Nyack College; M.C.E., D.Min., Colum- 
bia Theological Seminary; Ph.D. Cand., 
Michigan State University. 

Ines Elmina Arauz (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Christian Education 

B.S., Philadelphia College; M.R.E., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; M.A., Roosevelt 
University; M.A., Chicago State University. 

Gleason L. Archer, Jr. (TEDS) Professor of Old 
Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard; LL. B., Suffolk; 
B.D., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Ruben Armendariz (MTS) Professor of Ministry 
and Director of the Hispanic Ministries Program 
B.A., University of Texas; B.D., Austin 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Study, 
Presbyterian Institute of Industrial Relations. 

Ruth Armstrong (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Ministry 

B.A., William Jewell College; Study: Nor- 
thwestern University; National College of 
Education; University of Iowa. 

Ronald C. Arnett (BTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Communication 

B.S., Manchester College; M.A., Ohio Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Ohio University; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary. 

James Barbour Ashbrook (G-ETS) Professor of 
Religion and Personality 

A.B., Denison University; B.D., Colgate 
Rochester Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio 
State University; LL.D., Denison University. 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) Assistant Profes- 
sor of Pastoral Care 

B.A., Princeton University; M.Th., D.Min., 
University of Chicago; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Raymond J. Bakke (NBTS) Professor of Ministry 
Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Seattle Pacific 
College; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School; S.T.M., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; D.Min., McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 



101 



Mark P. Bangert (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Associate Professor of Ministry (Worship 
and Music) 

B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., 
S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., 
Ph.D. cand., University of Minnesota. Study, 
Indiana University; Northwestern University; 
St. John's University. 

Deirdre Banks (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Education 

R.N., Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, 
Australia; Dip. Theo., Melbourne Bible In- 
stitute; N.A., College of Nursing, Melbourne; 
L.Th., College of Divinity, Melbourne; M.A. 
Ed., Simpson College. 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) Associate Professor 
of World Mission and Associate Director, World 
Mission Program 

S.T.M., New York Theological Seminary; 
S.T.D., Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Dorothy C. Bass (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.A., Union 
Theological Seminary and Columbia Universi- 
ty; Ph.D., Brown University. 

Paul J. Bauermeister (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Ministry (Pastoral Care and 
Counseling) 

B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota; Wheat Ridge 
Foundation Mental Health Fellow. 

Warren S. Benson (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Vice President of Academic Ad- 
ministration 

B.A., Northwestern College; Th.M., Dallas 
Theological Seminary; M.R.E., Southwestern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Loyola 
University (Chicago). 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) Associate Profes- 
sor of Old Testament Studies 
B.S., Marian College; M.A., Ph.D., St. Louis 
University. 

Robert W. Bertram (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Historical and Systematic 
Theology 

B.A., Diploma in Theology, Concordia 
Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago. 

Steven Bevans, S.V.D. (CTU) Instructor in 
Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Divine Word College; S.T.B., S.T.L., 



Pontifical Gregorian University; Ph.D. cand., 
University of Notre Dame. 

Phyllis A. Bird (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament Interpretation 
A.B., University of California at Berkeley; 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary, New York; 
Th.D., Harvard Divinity School; Study, 
University of Heidelberg. 

Reidar B. Bjornard (NBTS) Professor of Old 
Testament 

Cand. Theol., University of Oslo; Th.D., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Study, 
Uppsala University; American School of 
Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Karen L. Bloomquist (LSTC) Assistant Professor 
of Church and Society 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Pacific 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.Phil., 
Ph.D. cand., Union Theological Seminary, 
New York. 

Robert G. Boling (MTS) Professor of Old Testament 
B.S., Indiana State College; M.Div., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University; Study, American School 
of Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Raymond A. Bowden (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Ministry, Vice President for Seminary Relations 
and Director of Placement 

A.B., Hanover College; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Hanover College. 

Patrick J. Boyle, S.J. (SML) Instructor, Christian 
Life Department 

M.A., Loyola University of Chicago; Ph.L., 
S.T.L., West Baden College; Ph.D., Marquette 
University. 

Jean Bozeman (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Educational Ministry and Dean of Students 
A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.A., Temple 
University; M.A., University of Chicago; 
Study at Michigan State University, 
Millersville State College. 

Carl E. Braaten (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology 

A.B., St. Olaf College; B.Th., Luther 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Fulbright Scholar, University of Paris (Sor- 
bonne); Sinclair Kennedy Traveling Fellow, 
University of Heidelberg. 

Gerard T. Broccolo (SML) Instructor, 
Department of Systematic Theology 
S.T.L., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; S.T.D., 
Pontifical Gregorian University, Rome. 



102 



Dale W. Brown (BTS) Professor of Christian 
Theology 

B.A., McPherson College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe (M/L) Professor Emeritus 
of Theology and Science 

Sc.D., Meadville/Lombard Theological 
School. 

John E. Burkhart (MTS) Professor of Theology 
B.A., D.D., Occidental College; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Southern California; Study, University Col- 
lege, London. 

Elizabeth F. Caldwell (MTS) Assistant Professor 
of Educational Ministry 

B.A., Southwestern at Memphis; M.Ed., 
Vanderbilt University; Study, Presbyterian 
School of Christian Education; University of 
North Alabama. 

Louis J. Cameli (SML) Professor, Department 
of Christian Life 

S.T.D., Pontifical Gregorian University, 
Rome. 

Earnest T. Campbell (G-ETS) Professor of 
Preaching and Worship 

A.B., Bob Jones University; B.D., Th.M., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; D.D., 
Westminster College; D.D., Albright College; 
Litt.D., Grove City College; L.H.D., Drury 
College; L.L.D., Wartburg College. 

Edward F. Campbell (MTS) Francis A. McGaw 
Professor of Old Testament 
B.A., Yale University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

David E. Carlson (TEDS) Visiting Professor 
of Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.A., M.A., Northern Illinois University; B.D., 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School; M.S.W., 
University of Chicago. 

Richard W. Carlson (NPTS) Associate Professor 
of Ministries and Director of Field Education 
B.A., North Park College; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary, New York; D.Min., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary; Study: North 
Park Theological Seminary. 

Robert W. Carlson (S-WTS) Professor of 
Ministries and Director df Field Education 
B.A., M.Div., Drew University; D.Min., 
Wesley Theological Seminary. 



Donald A. Carson (TEDS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.S., McGill University; M.Div., Central Bap- 
tist Seminary; Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

J. Walter Cason (G-ETS) Mrs. E.M. Spreng 
Professor of Christian Missions 
B.Sc, Rice University; B.D., Perkins School of 
Theology; M.A., Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity; Ph.D., Columbia University-Union 
Seminary. 

Donald Franklin Chatfield (GETS) Professor 
of Preaching and Worship 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Edinburgh. 

Robert A. Chesnut (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., College of Wooster; M.Div., Harvard 
Divinity School Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Andriy Freishyn-Chirovsky (CTU) Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Church History and Eastern Christian 
Theology 

Ph.B., Pontifical Urban University, Rome; 
M.A., University of St. Michael's College, 
Toronto; S.T.D. cand., Saint Mary of the Lake 
Seminary. Study, University of Notre Dame. 

Pauline M. Coffman (MTS) Adjunct Lec- 
turer in Ministry, Dean of Student Life 
B.A., University of Minnesota; M.S., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; M.A., Johns 
Hopkins University; Study, Johns Hopkins 
University. 

Robert E. Coleman (TEDS) Professor of 
Evangelism and Director of the School of World 
Mission and Evangelism 

B.A., Southwestern University; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Iowa. 

Gary R. Collins (TEDS) Professor of Pastoral 
Counseling and Psychology 

B.A., McMaster University; M.A., University 
of Toronto; Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Robert L. Conrad (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Ministry (Christian Educa- 
tion) 

B.A., M.Div., S.T.M., Concordia Seminary, 
St. Louis; M.A. in Education, Washington 
University; Ph.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Charles H. Cosgrove (NBTS) Assistant Pro- 
fessor of New Testament 



103 



B.A., Bethel College; M.Div., Bethel 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Robert H. Craig (MTS) Professorial Lecturer 
in Ministry and Associate Director of the Doctor of 
Ministry Program 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.Div., 
S.T.M., D.Min., McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 

Winston F. Crum (S-WTS) Professor of Theology 
and Lecturer in Ascetical Theology 
B.A., Carleton College; M.A., University of 
Minnesota; B.D., S.T.M., Seabury-Western 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

Agnes Cunningham, S.S.C.M. (SML) Professor, 
Department of Church History 
M.A., Marquette University; S.T.D., Facultes 
Catholiques, Lyon, France. 

Frederick W. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Netc Testament 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. Study, 
Washington University. 

William J. Danker (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Missions, Emeritus 
Diploma, Concordia College, Milwaukee; 
Diploma, Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
M.A., Wheaton College; D.Theol., University 
of Heidelberg. Study, University of Chicago. 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

B.A., Houghton College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.S. in L.S., University of Kentucky; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; Study: Colum- 
bia University; Union Theological Seminary; 
American Institute of Holy Land Studies; 
Asbury Theological Seminary; University of 
Tubingen. 

David E. Deppe (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Associate Professor of Ministry (Preaching) 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 
cordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D. cand., 
St. Louis University. Study, University of Min- 
nesota; Academia Hispano Americana. 

Raymond Diesbourg, M.S.C. (CTU) Instructor in 
Ethics, Registrar and Director of Admissions 
B.A., DePaul University; M.Div., Catholic 
Theological Union; S.T.L., S.T.D., cand., 
Lateran University, Rome. 

Perry Downs (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Christian 



Education; (TEDS) Associate Professor of Chris- 
tian Education 

B.S., Philadelphia College of the Bible; M.A., 
Ph.D., New York University. 

Carl S. Dudley (MTS) Professor of Church and 
Community 

B.A., Cornell University; M.Div., Union 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Study, New York 
School of Social Work, Washington Universi- 
ty, Industrial Areas Foundation. 

David G. Dunbar (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Biblical and Systematic Theology 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.Div., 
Biblical School of Theology; Th.M., 
Westminster Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Drew University. 

Donald F. Durnbaugh (BTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Manchester College; M.A., University of 
Michigan; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

A. Royce Eckhardt (NPTS) Director of Develop- 
ment, Lecturer in Hymnology; B.M., North Park 
College; M.M., University of Hartford. 

W. Dow Edgerton (CTS) Dean of Student Life and 
Assistant Professor of Ministry 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University; M.Div., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 



Elizabeth G. Edwards 

tor in Ministry 

B.A., Asbury College 

University. 



(NBTS) Adjunct Instruc- 
M.A. (cand.), Loyola 



Hal L. Edwards (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Ministry 

B.A., Asbury College; B.D., North Western 
Lutheran Theological Seminary. 

O. C. Edwards (S-WTS) Professor of Preaching 
B.A., Centenary College of Louisiana; S.T.B., 
The General Theological Seminary; S.T.M., 
Southern Methodist University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; D.D., Nashotah House. 

Charles O. Ellenbaum (NBTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Ministry 

B.A., Illinois State University; M.A., Michigan 
State University; M.Div., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) Professor of Social 
Ethics 

A.B., Johns Hopkins University; B.D., Mead- 
ville/Lombard Theological School; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



104 



Olle Engstrom (NPTS) Visiting Professor of 
Theology 

Honorary Doctorate in Theology, Uppsala 
University, Sweden; Honorary Doctorate in 
Humane Letters, North Park Theological 
Seminary. 

Nancy R. Faus (BTS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology and Worship, Campus Minister 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Col- 
umbia University; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Thomas N. Finger (NBTS) Associate Professor of 
Systematic Theology 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Gordon Divini- 
ty School; Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School; 
Fulbright Scholar, University of Munich; 
Fellow, Institute for the Advanced Study of 
Religion (University of Chicago). 

Robert H. Fischer (LSTC) Professor of Church 
History 

A.B., Gettysburg College; B.D., Lutheran 
Theological Seminary, Gettysburg; Ph.D., Yale 
University. Study at Tubingen University. 



Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) Professor of Old 

Testament 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 
Central Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, 
University of Erlangen. 

Yoshio Fukuyama (CTS) Professor of Religion and 
Society and Academic Dean 
A.B., Doane College; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary and the University of 
Chicago; Ph.D., in Sociology of Religion, 
University of Chicago; D.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Doane College. 

Dorothy Jean Furnish (G-ETS) Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., Cornell College; M.A., Ph.D., North- 
western University (Joint Program with Garrett 
Theological Seminary). 

Ismael Garcia (MTS) Assistant Professor of Chris- 
tian Ethics and Assistant in the Hispanic Ministries 
Program 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 



Neal F. Fisher (G-ETS) President and Professor 
of Theology and Society 

A.B., De Pauw University; M.Div., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Boston 
University Graduate School; LL.D., De Pauw 
University. 

Edward Foley, O.F.M. Cap. (CTU) Lecturer in 

Liturgy 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.Div., St. Francis 
Seminary; M.Mus., University of Wisconsin; 
M.A., Ph.D. cand., University of Notre Dame. 

Jerald L. Folk (LSTC) Visiting Professor of Theology 
B.A., Capital University; B.D., Wartburg 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., University of 
Tubingen. 

Archimedes Fornasari, M.C.C.J. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of Ethics 

B.A., M.A., Xavier University; Ph.D., 
Catholic University of America. 



Richard B. Gardner (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Biblical Studies and Director of Education for a 
Shared Ministry Program 

B.A., Juniata College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; D.Theol., University 
of Wurzburg. 

Victoria L. Garvey, R.S.M. (S-WTS) Instructor 
of Old Testament and Biblical Languages 
B.A., Mount Saint Agnes College; M.L.A., 
The Johns Hopkins University; M.A., Ph.D. 
Cand., Vanderbilt University. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L) and (CTS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Chicago. 

Anthony Gittins, C.S.Sp. (CTU) Associate Profes- 
sor of Mission Theology 
M.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. 



Gerald E. Forshey (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

A.B., University of California; M.Th., Iliff 
School of Theology; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago. 

Nadine Pence Frantz (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Theology 

B.A., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary. 



John Charles Godbey (M/L) Professor of Church 
History 

A.B., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Federated Theological Faculty, University of 
Chicago; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Polish Academy of Sciences. 

Norma S. Goertzen (NPTS) Assistant Professor 
of Theological Bibliography and Director of 
Mellander Library 



105 



B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associated Men- 
nonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory University. 

Justo Gonzalez (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., University of Havana; S.T.B., Union 
Theological Seminary, Mantanzas, Cuba; 
S.T.M., M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; Study, 
Yale University. 



Karin Granberg-Michaelson (NPTS) Visiting 
Instructor in Theology 

B.A., Hope College; M.T.S., Wesley 
Theological Seminary. 

Warren F. Groff (BTS) President and Warren W. 
Slabaugh Professor of Theological Studies 
B.A., Juniata College; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Dennis E. Groh (G-ETS) Professor of the History 
of Christianity (Patristics) 

B.A., Illinois Wesleyan University; B.D., Gar- 
rett Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Nor- 
thwestern University. 

Mayer I. Gruber (SCJ) Visiting Professor of 
Biblical Studies 

A.B., Duke University; M.H.L., Jewish 
Theological Seminary o{ America; M.A., 
M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University; Study: 
Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Hebrew 
Union College, Jerusalem; Jewish Theological 
Seminary of America. 

Wayne A. Grudem (TEDS) Associate Professor 
of New Testament 

B.A., Harvard University; M.Div., 
Westminster Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of Cambridge. 

Stuart C. Hackett (TEDS) Professor of Philosophy 
of Religion 

A.B., Cornell University; A.M., Wheaton Col- 
lege; Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Emily S. Demme Haight (G-ETS) Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., University of Texas at Austin; M.Div., 
Garrett Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Nor- 
thwestern University (Joint Program with 
Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary.) 

Edwin A. Hallsten, Jr. (NPTS) Associate Pro- 
fessor of Pastoral Care and Counseling 
B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; B.D., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Illinois. 



Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Professorial Lecturer 
in Ministry and Area Group Coordinator in the 
Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., King College; B.D., Union Theological 
Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Frederic Hang, C.S.S.R. (CTU) Lecturer in 
Preaching and Communication 
B.A., Holy Redeemer College; M.Div., M.R.E., 
Mt. St. Alphonsus Seminary; M.A., Nor- 
thwestern University; M.P.S., Loyola Universi- 
ty- 
Adolf M. Hansen (G-ETS) Vice President for 
Student Affairs and Part-time Associate Professor 
of New Testament 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B. and S.T.M., 
New York Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University (Joint program with 
Garrett Evangelical Seminary). 

William P. Haugaard (S-WTS) Assistant Dean for 
Academic Affairs and Diocese of Chicago Professor 
of Church History 

B.A., Princeton University; M.Div., The 
General Theological Seminary; Th.D., The 
General Theological Seminary. 

William R. Hausman (NPTS) President 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ed.M., Harvard 
University; Study: North Park Theological 
Seminary; D.D., Trinity Evangelical Divinity 
School. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of 
Doctrinal Theology 

B.A, Quincy College; Dr. Theol., Friederich- 
Wilhelm University, Bonn; Litt.D., St. 
Bonaventure University. 

Herbert Hedstrom (NPTS) Visiting Instructor of 
Ministry 

B.A., Earlham College; M.A., Duke Universi- 
ty; M.Div., Yale University Divinity School; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological Seminary; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary. 

Philip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of Systematic 
Theology and Director of Graduate Studies 
A.B., Midland Lutheran College; M.Div., 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; L.H.D., 
Midland College; Fulbright Scholar at Univer- 
sity of Tubingen. 

Kurt K. Hendel (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Associate Professor of Historical Theology 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 



106 



cordia Seminary, St. Louis; M.A., Ph.D., Ohio 
State University. Fulbright Scholar at Univer- 
sity of Gottingen. 



Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary and Nor- 
thwestern University. 



Allegra Hess (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Colloquium 
B.A., Elizabethtown College; M.A., Indiana 
University; M.A., George Williams College. 

David J. Hesselgrave (TEDS) Professor of Mission 
Dip., Trinity Theological Seminary; B.A., 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Walla Walla College; B.D., Adventist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., University o( 
Chicago; D.Theol., University of Basel. 

John E. Hinkle, Jr. (G-ETS) Professor of 
Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Taylor University; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Nor- 
thwestern University (Joint Program with Gar- 
rett Theological Seminary); Diplomate, 
American Association of Pastoral Counselors. 

J. Robert Hjelm (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Studies 

A.B., Morningside College; M.Div., North 
Park Theological Seminary; D.Min., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Fredrick Holmgren (NPTS) Professor of Biblical 
Literature 

A.B., Calvin College; B.D., S.T.M., Th.D., 
Union Theological Seminary, New York; 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary. 

John Paul Holsey (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Ministry 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist University; M.Div., 
Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary; 
Th.M., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

Nancy Wiles Holsey (BTS/NBTS) Adjunct In- 
structor in Greek 

B.S., Texas Wesleyan Collge; M.A., (Th.S.), 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Old Testament Studies 

B.A., St. Francis College; M.A., Aquinas In- 
stitute of Theology; Ph.D., Northwestern 
University and Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Estella Boggs Horning (BTS/NBTS) Adjunct 
Faculty in Biblical Studies 

B.A., Manchester College; R.N., Presbyterian- 
St. Luke's Hospital; M.Div., Bethany 



Carol Diane Howard (NBTS) Assistant Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.Div., Gordon- 
Conwell Theological Seminary; Th.D. cand., 
Harvard Divinity School. 

John Huels, O.S.M. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Church Law 

B.A., St. Louis University; M.A., M.Div., 
Catholic Theological Union; J.C.B., J.C.L., 
J. CD., Catholic University of America. 

Kathleen Hughes, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of Liturgy 

B.A., Newton College; M.A., Catholic Univer- 
sity of America; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame. 

C. Michael Ideran (NBTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Pastoral Care and Counseling 
B.A., Luther College; M.Div., Wartburg Col- 
lege; D.Min., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

Willard F. Jabusch (SML) Professor, Department 
of Ministry 

M.A., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; M.A., 
Loyola University of Chicago; Ph.D., North- 
western University. 

Everett Jackson (NPTS) Visiting Instructor of 
Ministry 

B.S., Roosevelt University; M.Ed., Northern Il- 
linois University; M.Div., Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; CPE, Community 
Hospital of Evanston, St. Francis Hospital of 
Evanston; Study: Northern Illinois University. 

E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) Professor of Christian 
Education and Director of Doctoral Studies 
B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; Study: Harvard Univer- 
sity. CPE, Presbyterian-St. Luke's Hospital, 
Chicago. 

Robert Jewett (G-ETS) Professor of New Testament 
Interpretation 

B.A., Nebraska Wesleyan University; B.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary/University of 
Chicago; Dr. theol., University of Tubingen. 

Norbert Johnson (NPTS) Visiting Instructor of 
Ministry 
B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., North Park 



107 



Theological Seminary; Th.M., Union 
Theological Seminary, Virginia. 

Philip R. Johnson (LSTC) Instructor in Pastoral 
Care and Counseling 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther 
Theological Seminary. 

Everard Johnston (CTU) Visiting Lecturer in 
New Testament Studies 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Louvain. 

Robert K. Johnston (NPTS) Vice President and 
Dean of the Seminary, Associate Professor of 
Theology and Culture 

A.B., Stanford University; B.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University, 
Study: North Park Theological Seminary. 

Frank B. Jones (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Black Church Studies 

B.A., Lawrence University; M.DIv., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., In- 
diana University. 

James W. Jones (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor in 
Theology 

B.A., Taylor University; M.A., Western Ken- 
tucky University; M.Div., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. 

Emma J. Justes (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Psychology and Counseling 
B.A., Franklin College of Indiana; B.D., Col- 
gate Rochester Divinity School; Th.M., Ph.D., 
Princeton Theology Seminary. 

Walter C. Kaiser, Jr. (TEDS) Professor of Old 
Testament and Semitic Languages; Academic 
Dean and Vice President of Education 
A.B., Wheaton College; B.D., Wheaton 
Graduate School of Theology; M.A., Ph.D., 
Brandeis University. 

Augustine Kanjamala, S.V.D. (CTU) Visiting 
Lecturer in Mission Theology 
B.A., Christian College; Ph.L., S.T.L., Pon- 
tifical Athenaeum, Poona; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Lancaster. 

Kenneth S. Kantzer (TEDS) Dean Emeritus and 
Distinguished Professor of Biblical and Systematic 
Theology 

A.B., Ashland College; A.M., Ohio State 
University; B.D., S.T.M., Faith Theological 
Seminary, Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Robert Karris, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of New 
Testament Studies 
B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B., Pontifical 



Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; S.T.L., 
Catholic University of America; Th.D., Har- 
vard University. 

Ralph Keifer (CTU) Professor of Liturgy 

B.A., Providence College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Notre Dame. 

Gerald F. Kicanas (SML) Rector-President 

M.A., S.T.L., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary, 
M.Ed., Ph.D., Loyola University, Chicago; 
Study, St. Louis University; Institutes in 
Bethlehem, Israel; Lajolla, California; Lincoln, 
Nebraska. 

Ralph W. Klein (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of Old Testament 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 
cordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.D., Harvard 
University. Study, University of Michigan; 
University of Gottingen. 

Edgar M. Krentz (LSTC) Christ Seminary- 
Seminex Professor of New Testament 
B.A., M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
M.A., Ph.D., Washington University. Study, 
University of Chicago; American School of 
Classical Studies, Athens; University of Tub- 



Andre LaCocque (CTS) Professor of Old Testa- 
ment and Director, Center for Jewish-Christian 
Studies 
D.Litt., D.Theol., University of Strasbourg. 

David L. Larsen (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Practical Theology 

B.A., Stanford University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Darryl Larson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Church Growth 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; D.Min., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Study: Fuller 
Theological Seminary; University of the 
Pacific; Bethel Theological Seminary. 

Robert Larson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Pastoral Studies 

A.B., Lewis and Clark College; B.D., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.U.P., Ph.D., 
University of Washington; Study: Garrett 
Theological Seminary. 

Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU) Adjunct 
Professor of New Testament Studies 
M.A.John Carroll University; S.T.L., Univer- 
sity of Fribourg; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical In- 
stitute; Eleve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, 
Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 



108 



Bruce Lawson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Chnstian Education 

B.A., North Park College; M.C.E., 
Presbyterian School of Christian Education. 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor of Theology 
B.A., Harvard University; B.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

William E. Lesher (LSTC) President 

A.B., Wittenberg University; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; D.D., Califor- 
nia Lutheran College; D.D., Pacific Lutheran 
University. 

David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Director of Field Educa- 
tion 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) President and As- 
sociate Professor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Georgetown University; S.T.B., M.A., 
S.T.L., S.T.D., University of Louvain. 

Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Erlangen; Th.D., 
Boston University School of Theology; Study, 
University of Miinster; University of Michigan. 

Jerome E. Listecki (SML) Instructor, Department 
of Christian Life 

S.T.L., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; J. C.L., 
J. CD., Pontifical University of St. Thomas 
Aquinas, Rome; J.D., DePaul University. 

John G. Lodge (SML) Academic Dean and 
Assistant Professor, Bible Department 
M.Div., S.T.L., St. Mary of the Lake 
Seminary; M.A., University of Illinois, 
Chicago; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, 
Rome. 

John M. Lozano, C.M.F. (CTU) Professor of 
Spiritual Theology 

B.A., Claretian College; S.T.L., Universite 
Catholique de l'Ouest, Angers; S.S.L., Pon- 
tifical Biblical Institute, Rome; S.T.D., Univer- 
sity of St. Thomas, Rome. 



Thesis Administrator of the Doctor of Ministry Pro- 
gram 

B.A., University of Minnesota; B.D., North 
Park Theological Seminary; M.A., D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Simon S. Maimela (LSTC) Visiting Professor of 
Theology and Ethics; (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Theology 

B.A., University of South Africa; Th.M., 
Luther Theological Seminary; Th.D., Harvard 
University. 

Carl Malin (LSTC) Instructor in Pastoral Care 
and Counseling 

B.A., Upsala College; M.Div., Lutheran 
School of Theology at Chicago. 

Paul Manz (LSTC) Christ Seminary Seminex 
Professor of Ministry (Church Music) and Artist in 
Residence 

B.S. in Ed., Concordia College, River Forest; 
M.M., Northwestern University; Fulbright 
Scholar, First Prize in Organ and Improvisa- 
tion, Royal Flemish Conservatory at Antwerp, 
Belgium; Litt.D., Concordia College, Seward; 
D.Mus. (Hon.), Carthage College; L.H.D., 
Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

Marjorie S. Matthews (G-ETS) Bishop in Resi- 
dence and Visiting Professor of Old Testament In- 
terpretation 

B.A., Central Michigan University; M.Div., 
Colgate Rochester Divinity School; M.A., 
Ph.D., Florida State University; D.D., Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary. 

Marie McCarthy, S.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor 
of Pastoral Care 

B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.M., 
Butler University; M.A., Catholic Theological 
Union; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Taylor McConnell (G-ETS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.A., University of Denver; Th.M., Th.D., Iliff 
School of Theology; D.D., Westminster Col- 
lege. 

Kenneth M. Meyer (TEDS) President 

Dip., B.D., Trinity Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., Luther Rice University. 



Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) Instructor in Religious 
Education 

B.S., St. Mary of the Woods College; M.A., 
Mundelein College. 



Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) Associate Professor 
of Biblical Theology 

B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 



George P. Magnuson (MTS) Professorial Lecturer 
in Church and Ministry and Major Project and 



109 



Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament 

B.D. (equiv.), University of Vienna; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Study, Univer- 
sity of Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Western Michigan 
University; Yale University; Pontifical Biblical 
Institute; Loyola University. 

Donald E. Miller (BTS) Brightbill Professor of 
Ministry Studies and Ethics and Director of 
Graduate Studies 

M.A., University of Chicago; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity; Study, Yale University; Cambridge 
University. 

Leonel L. Mitchell (S-WTS) Registrar and 
Professor of Liturgies 

B.A., Trinity College; S.T.B., Berkeley Divini- 
ty School; S.T.M., Th.D., The General 
Theological Seminary. 

Douglas J. Moo (TEDS) Associate Professor of 

New Testament 

B.A., DePauw University; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of St. Andrews. 

Christopher Moore (M/L) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry of Music 

A.B., Harvard; B.D., Meadville/Lombard; 
S.T.M., Harvard University. 

Robert L. Moore (CTS) Professor of Theology 
and Personality 

B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., Southern 
Methodist University; M.Th., Duke Univer- 
sity; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Alfred Adler Institute, Chicago. 

Wilda W. Morris (NBTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., The American University; A.M., The 
University of Illinois; Ph.D., The University of 
Illinois; M.A. in C.E., M.Div., Northern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary. 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) Assistant Professor 
of Religion and Society and Director of Hispanic 
Studies 

B.S., Polytechnic Institute, Buenos Aires; L. 
Soc, University of Argentina; B.Th., Latin 
American Biblical Seminary, San Jose, Costa 
Rica; Th.M., Princeton Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D. cand., Emory University. Study, Inter- 
national Baptist Theological Seminary, Buenos 
Aires and Princeton University. 



Lewis S. Mudge (MTS) Dean of the Seminary 
and Professor of Theology 

B.A., Princeton University; B.A., M.A., Ox- 
ford University; B.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., 
Princeton University; Study, University of 
Marburg; University of Paris. 

Paul E. R. Mundey (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in 
Evangelism 

B.S., Towson State, University; M.Div., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Larry G. Murphy (G-ETS) Professor of the 
History of Christianity 

B.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., 
Graduate Theological Union. 

Steven Murphy (CTU) Dean of Students 

B.A., Boston College; M.A., Andover-Newton 
Theological Seminary; M.Ed., Loyola Universi- 
ty; Ed.D. cand., Northern Illinois University. 

William R. Myers (CTS) Assistant Professor of 
Christian Education and Director of Field Educa- 
tion 

M.Div., Pittsburgh Theological Seminary; 
M.Ed., Rhode Island College; Ed.D., Loyola 
University of Chicago. 

William R. Myers (NBTS) President and Charles 
W. Koller Professor of Preaching 
B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; D.D., Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; L.D.H., Sioux 
Empire College; Ed.D. (Hon.), Judson College; 
Study, Union Theological Seminary; Princeton 
Theological Seminary. 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., M.A., Catholic 
Theological Union; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

David Nasgowitz (BTS/NBTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Hebrew 

Th.B., North American Baptist Seminary; 
B.S., Marquette University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Peter T. Nash (G-ETS) Instructor of Old 
Testament Interpretation 

A.B., Concordia Sr. College, Ft. Wayne; 
M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Robert Navarro (LSTC) Director of Hispanic 
Ministries Program and Lecturer in Theology 
Escuela Nacional de Maestros; B.D., Wartburg 
Theological Seminary; M.S.T., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 



10 



Arthur A. R. Nelson (NPTS) Visiting Instructor 
of Ministry 

B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., North Park 
Theological Seminary; Study: McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Betty Nelson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Christian Education 

A.A., North Park College; B.A., Augustana 
College; M.A., Northwestern University. 

F. Burton Nelson (NPTS) Professor of Theology 
and Ethics 

A.B., Brown University; B.D., Yale University 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Northwestern Univer- 
sity and Garrett Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary; University 
of Chicago. 

William E. Nelson (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Ministry 
B.A., M.A., Western Illinois University. 

William R. Nelson (NBTS) Associate Professor 
of Ministry and Director of Field Education 
B.S., College of Charleston; B.D., Th.M., 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Fulbright 
Scholar, University of Heidelberg. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) Professor of 
Church History and Director of World Mission 
Program 

B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Techny; L.Miss., 
Gregorian University, Rome; M.A., Catholic 
University, Washington; Ph.D., Cambridge 
University. 

Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor of Preaching 
B.S., Northwestern University; M.Div., 
Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Union Theological Seminary; Fulbright 
Scholar at Manchester University. 

Eric H. Ohlmann (NBTS) Professor of Christian 
Heritage and Associate Dean 
B.A., University of Alberta; B.D., North 
American Baptist Seminary; Th.M., Southern 
Baptist Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Graduate Theological Union; Study, 
Predigerseminar, Hamburg. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Professor of 
Bibliography 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois; Study, University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint 
Louis University; Spalding College. 



Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) Associate Pro- 
fessor of New Testament Studies 
B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; M.A.T., 
Manhattanville College; Th.D., Harvard 
University. 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) Professor of 

Liturgy 

S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical Athenaeum 
Antonianum, Rome; Study, Harvard Universi- 
ty; University of California. 

Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Professor of Theology 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; B.D., San 
Francisco Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; Study, 
University of Munich. 

John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) Professor 
of Ethics and Director of M.A. Program 
A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chautauqua 
Professor of Jewish Studies 

B.A., McGill University, Montreal; M.H.L., 
Jewish Institute of Religion, New York; D.H.L., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of 
Religion; D.D., Hebrew Union College, Cin- 
cinnati. 

Arturo Perez (CTU) Lecturer in Liturgy 

B.A., Niles College; M.Div., St. Mary of the 
Lake Seminary; M.A., University of Notre 
Dame. 

Albert P. Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Associate Professor 
of Theology and Cross-Cultural Studies 
A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; B.Th., Con- 
cordia Theological Seminary, Springfield, IL; 
S.T.D., Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

James Persson (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of Ministry 
B.S., Mankato State University; M.Div., North 
Park Theological Seminary; Study: Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Richard I. Pervo (S-WTS) Associate Professor of 
New Testament and Patristics 
B.A., Concordia College; B.D., Episcopal 
Theological School; Th.D., Harvard Universi- 
ty- 
Douglas Edward Petersen (S-WTS) Director of 
Music and Organist; Adjunct Professor of Church 
Music 

MSM., B.D., Union Theological Seminary; 
Licentiate, Trinity College, London; American 
Conservatory of Music, Columbia University; 
Associate of the American Guild of Organists. 



Ill 



Rodney L. Petersen (TEDS) Assistant Professor of 
Church History and the History of Christian 
Thought 

B.A., M.Div., Th.M., Harvard University; 
Ph.D. Cand., Princeton Theological Seminary. 

John E. Phelan, Jr. (NPTS) Dean of Students, 
Assistant Professor in Biblical Liberature 
B.G.S., Trevecca College; M.A., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., Nor- 
thwestern University. 

Jamie Phelps, O.P. (CTU) Instructor in Doctrinal 
Theology 

B.A., Siena Heights College; M.S.W., Univer- 
sity of Illinois; M.A., St. John's University; 
Ph.D. cand., Catholic University of America. 



Jay C. Rochelle (LSTC) Assistant Professor of 
Worship and Dean of the Chapel 
B.A., Concordia Senior College; M.Div., Con- 
cordia Seminary, St. Louis; Th.M., Pittsburgh 
Theological Seminary; Study, Valparaiso 
University; Yale University. 

Charles A. Rogers (G-ETS) Professor of Historical 
Theology 

B.A., Southwestern University; B.D., Perkins 
School of Theology; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Eugene F. Roop (BTS) Professor of Biblical 
Studies 

B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School. 



Barbara Phillips (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Chrisitan Education 

B.A., North Park College; M.A., Northeastern 
Illinois University; Ph.D. Cand., Northwestern 
University. 

James N. Poling (BTS) Associate Professor of 
Pastoral Theology and Counseling 
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., School of 
Theology in Claremont. 

George Polk (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Pastoral 
Care and Counseling 

M.Div., Virginia Union University; S.T.M., 
New York Theological Seminary; Doctor of 
Sacred Literature, Christ Bible College, New 
York. 

Jerold Reed (NPTS) Visiting Instructor in 
Missiology 

B.S., University of California, Davis; B.D., 
D.Miss., Fuller Theological Seminary; Study: 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

Gene Reeves (M/L) Professor of Theology, Dean and 
Chief Executive 

A.B., University of New Hampshire; S.T.B., 
Boston University; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Thomas P. Reynolds, S.S.C. (CTU) Visiting 
Lecturer in Mission Theology 
B.A., University of Hull; M.A., University of 
Wisconsin; M.A., Ph.D., Marquette Universi- 
ty- 

V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., College of Wooster; B.D., Yale Divinity 
School; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; Study, 
Oxford University. 



Theodore C. Ross, S.J. (CTU) Lecturer in Church 
History 

Litt. B., Xavier University; Ph.D., West Baden 
College; M.A. (History), M.A. (Theology), 
Loyola University of Chicago; S.T.L., Bellar- 
mine School of Theology. 

Wolfgang Roth (G-ETS) Professor of Old 
Testament Interpretation and Director, joint Ph.D. 
Program (with Northwestern University) 
cand. rev. min., Universities of Marburg, 
Tubingen, Heidelberg; Th.M., Th.D., Victoria 
University /Toronto School of Theology. 

Byron P. Royer (BTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Pastoral Psychology 

B.S., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Rosemary Radford Ruether (GETS) Georgia 
Harkness Professor of Applied Theology 
B.A., Scripps College; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont 
Graduate School, L.H.D.: Denison University; 
Emmanuel College, Boston; Wittenberg 
University, Xavier University; Hamilton Col- 
lege; St. Olafs College; Walsh College. 

John H. Sailhamer (TEDS) Associate Professor of 
Old Testament and Semitic Languages 
B.A., University of California at Long Beach; 
Th.M., Dallas Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California at Long Beach. 

James Savolainen (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Greek 

A. A., Suomi College; B.A., Augsburg College; 
M.Div., Bethel Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. 



112 



Herman E. Schaalmann (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member 

B.A., M.A., University of Cincinnati; B.H.L., 
M.H.L., D.D., Hebrew Union College. 

Thomas A. Schafer (MTS) Professor of Church 
History 

B.A., Maryville College; B.D., Louisville 
Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
Duke University. 

Donna Schaper (UA) Executive Director; (CTS) 
Adjunct Professor of Church and Community 
B.A., Gettysburg College; M.A., University of 
Chicago; M.Div., Lutheran Theological 
Seminary at Gettysburg. 

James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor of Missions 
and Church History 

A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Study, Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; Columbia 
University; International Christian University, 
Japan; Oxford University. 

Daniel S. Schipani (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer 
in Educational Ministry 

Lie, Prof., Universidad de Buenos Aires; Dr., 
Universidad Catolica Argentina; M.A.R., 
Goshen Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study, University of 
California at Los Angeles. 

David M. Scholer (NBTS) Julius R. Mantey 
Professor of New Testament and Dean of the 
Seminary 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., Wheaton Col- 
lege Graduate School; B.D., Gordon Divinity 
School; Th.D., Harvard Divinity School. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.PP.S. (CTU) Professor 
of Doctrinal Theology and Dean 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., University 
of Nijmegen; Study, Oxford University. 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor of Religion 
and Society 

B.A., Bethel College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; B.D., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Robin J. Scroggs (CTS) Professor of New 
Testament 

B.A., B.Mus., University of North Carolina; 
B.D., Duke University; Ph.D., Princeton 
University. 

William L. Secor, Jr. (TEDS) Assistant Profes- 
sor of Pastoral Counseling and Psychology 
B.Th., Baptist Bible Seminary; M.A., Farleigh 



Dickinson University; Ph.D. Cand., Marquette 
University. 

Timothy F. Sedgwick (S-WTS) Associate Profes- 
sor of Ethics and Moral Theology 
A.B., Albion College; M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt 
University. 

Charles M. Sell (TEDS) Professor of Christian 
Education 

B.A., University of Pittsburg; Th.M., Th.D., 
Dallas Theological Seminary. 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) Professor of New 
Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; 
Baccalaureat en Theologie, S.T.L., S.T.D., 
University of Louvain. 

Neil H. Shadle (M/L) Associate Professor of 
Ministry and Dean of Students 
A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; B.D., Mead- 
ville/Lombard Theological School; D.Min., 
Pacific School of Religion. 

Douglas R. Sharp (NBTS) Registrar and 
Director of Admissions 

B.A., William Jewell College; M.Div., 
American Baptist Seminary of the West; Ph.D. 
cand., Graduate Theological Union. 

John J. Shea (SML) Assistant Professor, Department 
of Systematic Theology; Program Director, Doctor 
of Ministry Program 
S.T.D., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary. 

Franklin Sherman (LSTC) Professor of Christian 
Ethics and Dean 

A.B., Muhlenberg College; M.Div., Chicago 
Lutheran Theological Seminary; M.A., Oxford 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Byron L. Sherwin (SCJ) Vice-President for 
Academic Affairs and David C. Verson Professor 
of Jewish Philosophy and Mysticism 
B.S., Columbia University; M.A., New York 
University; Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
B.H.L., M.H.L., Jewish Theological Seminary 
of America. 

Henry Carl Simmons (G-ETS) Associate Profes- 
sor of Christian Education 

B.A., Passionist Seminary, Jamaica, NY; M.A., 
St. Michael's Seminary, Union City, NJ; 
M.Th., S.T.L., St. Paul University, Ottawa, 
Ontario; Ph.D., University of Ottawa; Diploma 
en catechese et pastorale, Lumen Vitae, 
Brussels. 



113 



Dick W. Simpson (UA) Executive Director, 
ICUIS. 

B.A., University of Texas; M.A., Indiana 
University; Ph.D., Indiana University; M.Div., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Mark S. Sisk (S-WTS) Dean and President 

B.S., University of Maryland; M.Div., The 
General Theological Seminary. 

Joseph Sittler (LSTC) Distinguished Professor in 
Residence 

A.B., LL.D., Wittenberg University; B.D., 
Hamma School of Theology; D.D., Wagner 
College; L.H.D., Alfred University; Litt.D., 
Meadville Theological School; Study, Get- 
tysburg College; University of Notre Dame; 
Loyola University, Chicago; Oberlin College; 
University of Chicago; Western Reserve 
University; University of Heidelberg. 

Newland F. Smith, 3rd. (S-WTS) Librarian, 
Secretary to the Faculty, Associate Professor of 
Bibliography; (NPTS) Visiting Professor of Library 
Science 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate 
Library School, University of Chicago; B.D., 
Garrett Theological Seminary. 

Klyne R. Snodgrass (NPTS) Professor of Biblical 
Literature 

B.A., Columbia Bible College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Ph.D., University 
of St. Andrews, Scotland. 

Graydon F. Snyder (BTS) Wieand Professor of 
New Testament Studies and Dean 
B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study, Pontifical In- 
stitute of Christian Archaeology, Rome; Cam- 
bridge University. 

Howard Snyder (NPTS) Adjunct Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., Greenville College; M.Div., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., University of 
Notre Dame. 

William Richard Stegner (G-ETS) Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., University of Cincinnati; B.D., Drew 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Drew University. 

K. James Stein (G-ETS) jubilee Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., Westmar College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; D.D., Westmar College. 



Philip N. Stenberg (NPTS) Visiting Instructor 
of Ministry 

B.A., Bethel College, Mishawaka, IN: M.Div., 
North Park Theological Seminary; D.Min., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

W. Taylor Stevenson (S-WTS) Professor of 
Philosophical Theology 

B.A., Princeton University; B.D. Virginia 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Durham Univer- 
sity. 

Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) Professor of 

Old Testament Studies 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic Institute, Chicago; 
S.T.L., Catholic University; S.S.L., S.S.D., 
Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome; D.H.L., St. 
Benedict College. 

Paul R. Swanson (LSTC) Professor of Pastoral 
Care 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., Augustana 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Andover- 
Newton Theological School; Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

John Paul Szura, O.S.A. (CTU) Associate Pro- 
fessor of Psychology and Theology and Director of 
M.DiV. Program 

B.A., Villanova University; M.A., St. Louis 
University; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois Institute of 
Technology; Ph.D., Fordham University. 

George J. Taylor (NBTS) Professor of Pastoral 
Care and Counseling 

Diploma, Escuela Artes y Oficios, Panama; 
Diploma Theology, Latin American Biblical 
Seminary, Costa Rica; B.A., Whitworth Col- 
lege; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University; 
Additional Studies, Fuller Theological 
Seminary. 

William D. Taylor (TEDS) Associate Professor 
of Latin American Studies 

B.A., North Texas State University; Th.M., 
Dallas Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Universi- 
ty of Texas. 

Susan B. Thistlethwaite (CTS) Assistant Professor 
of Theology and Culture 

B.A., Smith College; M.Div., Duke Divinity 
School; Ph.D., Duke University. 

Richard Tholin (G-ETS) Professor of Social Ethics 
and Academic Dean 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; S.T.M., Ph.D., Union 
Theological Seminary. 



114 



William G. Thompson, S.J. (MTS) Adjunct 
Lecturer in New Testament 

B.A., M.A., Loyola University; S.T.L., West 
Baden College; S.S.L., S.S.D., Pontifical 
Biblical Institute, Rome; Study, Xavier Univer- 
sity. 

John H. Tietjen (LSTC) Christ Seminary -Seminex 
Adjunct Professor of American Church History 
B.A., B.D., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
S.T.M., Th.D., Union Theological Seminary, 
New York. 

Robert I. Tobias (LSTC) Professor of Ecumenics 
A.B., Phillips University; M.A., Graduate 
School of Theology, Phillips University; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; Th.D., Universi- 
ty of Geneva and Graduate School of 
Ecumenical Studies. 

Emilie M. Townes (G-ETS) Adjunct Faculty 
Member; (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in Ethics 
B.A., M.A., D.Min., University of Chicago. 

Ruth A. Tucker (TEDS) Visiting Professor of 
Mission 

B.A., LeTourneau College; M.A., Baylor 
University; Ph.D., Northern Illinois Universi- 
ty- 
Robert G. Tuttle, Jr. (G-ETS) E. Stanley Jones 
Professor of Evangelism 

A.B., Duke University; B.D., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Wheaton 
Graduate School of Theology; Ph.D., Universi- 
ty of Bristol. 

Katherine B. Tyson (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Pastoral Care and Counseling 
B.A., Yale University; M.Div., Yale Divinity 
School; M.A., University of Chicago. 

David L. Vikner (LSTC) Adjunct Professor of 
World Mission 

A.B., Augustana College; B.D., D.D., 
Augustana Theological Seminary. Study, Yale 
Divinity School; University of California, 
Berkeley. 

Arthur Voobus (LSTC) Professor Emeritus of 
New Testament and Church History 
Cand. Theol., Mag. Theol., Dr. Theol., 
University of Tartu, Estonia. 

Donald M. Vorp (MTS and LSTC) Director, 
Jesuit'Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Drew 
University. 



Paul Wadell, C.P. (CTU) Assistant Professor of 
Ethics 

B.A., Bellarmine College; M.Div., M.A., 
Catholic Theological Union; Ph.D., University 
of Notre Dame. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Professor of Historical 
Research 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary Col- 
lege. 

Don Wardlaw (MTS) James G. K. McClure 
Professor of Preaching and Worship 
B.A., Columbia University; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; Ph.D., 
University of Aberdeen. 

Robert Webber (NBTS) Adjunct Professor of Chris- 
tian Heritage 

B.A., Bob Jones University; B.D., Reformed 
Episcopal Seminary; Th.M., Covenant 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Concordia 
Theological Seminary. 

C. John Weborg (NPTS) Associate Professor of 
Theology 

A.B., University of Nebraska; B.D., North 
Park Theological Seminary; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Garrett 
Evangelical Seminary and Northwestern 
University. 

Mark I. Wegener (LSTC) Instructor in Greek 
B.A., Concordia Senior College, Ft. Wayne; 
M.Div., Concordia Seminary, St. Louis; 
S.T.M., Christ Seminary-Seminex. 

Laurence L. Welborn (MTS) Instructor in Biblical 
Studies 

B.A., Harding College; M.A., Yale University 
Divinity School; M., Eberhard-Karl University 
Tubingen; M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D. 
(cand.), University of Chicago. 

Wayne C. Weld (NPTS) Professor of Missions 
A.B., University of Washington; B.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; M.A., D.Miss., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; Study: North Park 
Theological Seminary. 

David J. Wieand (BTS) Professor Emeritus of 
Biblical Studies 

B.A., Juniata College; M.A., New York 
University; B.D., Bethany Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Chicago Institute of Psychoanalysis; Na- 
tional Training Laboratory; National Protes- 
tant Laboratory, Green Lake; American 



115 



School of Oriental Research, Jerusalem; North- 
east Career Center, Princeton; Brook Lane 
Psychiatric Center, Hagerstown. 

John Wiens (NPTS) Visiting Instructor of Ministry 
Diploma, Moody Bible Institute; A.B., 
Wheaton College; A.M., Wheaton Graduate 
School; M.A., University of Chicago; M.Div., 
North Park Theological Seminary. 

James E. Will (G-ETS) Henry P.feiffer Professor 
of Systematic Theology 

B.A., North Central College; B.D., Evangelical 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia 
University and Union Theological Seminary. 

Gail B. Wilson (MTS) Lecturer in Speech 
Communications 

B.A., Roosevelt University; M.A., North- 
western University. 

Edward P. Wimberly (G-ETS) Associate Professor 
of Pastoral Care 

B.A., University of Arizona; S.T.B., S.T.M., 
Boston University School of Theology; Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

Douglas E. Wingeier (G-ETS) Professor of 
Christian Education 

B.A., Taylor University; S.T.B., Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

Richard J. Wojcik (SML) Professor, Department 
of Ministry and Director of Music 
M.A., S.T.L., St. Mary of the Lake Seminary; 
M.C.G., Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music, 
Rome. 

William J. Wood (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Philosophy of Religion 

B.A., Westmont College; M.A. and Ph.D. 
(cand.), University of Notre Dame. 

John D. Woodbridge (TEDS) Professor of Church 
History and The History of Christian Thought 
A.B., Wheaton College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; M.Div., Trinity Evangelical Divini- 
ty School; Ph.D., University of Toulouse. 

Robert C. Worley (MTS) Professor of Education 
and Ministry and Director of the Doctor of 
Ministry Program 

B.A., Oklahoma State University; D.D.S., 
M.S., Northwestern University; B.D., McCor- 
mick Theological Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 
University. 

Brian Wren (BTS) Adjunct Faculty in Worship 
M.A., D.Phil., Mansfield College, Oxford, 
England. 



Walter Wright, Jr. (NPTS) Adjunct Professor 
of Ministry 

B.A., Simpson College; M.Div., Ph.D., Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Henry James Young (G-ETS) Associate Professor of 
Theology and Ethics 

B.A., Tougaloo College; Th.M., Boston 
University School of Theology; Ph.D., Hart- 
ford Seminary Foundation. 

Warren Cameron Young (NBTS) Distinguished 
Professor of Theology and Christian Philosophy, 
Emeritus 

A.B., Gordon College; B.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., Boston 
University; Study: University of Heidelberg; 
University of Basel. 



LIBRARIANS 

Jacquelyn L. Allen (TEDS) Cataloging 
Librarian 

B.A., Bob Jones University; A.M.L.S., Univer- 
sity of Michigan. 

Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Librarian 

B.A., University of Redlands; M.A.L.S., 
Rosary College. 

Janet D. Boyle (CTU) Head of Technical 
Services 

B.A., Rosary college; M.S.L.S., University of Il- 
linois. 

Alva Caldwell (G-ETS) Librarian, The United 
Library, G-ETS/S-WTS 

B.A., Buena Vista College; M.Div., Garrett 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary Col- 
lege. 

Deborah J. Cocanig (CTU) Cataloger 

B.A., College of St. Francis; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Cheryl E. Dieter QKM) Acquisitions Librarian, 
Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., Valparaiso University; M.A., University 
of Notre Dame. 

Hedda Durnbaugh (BTS/NBTS) Catalog and 
Special Collections Librarian, The Seminary 
Library, BTS/NBTS 

B.A., equivalent, University of Vienna; M.A., 
Northwestern University; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; Study, Philipps University, Marburg. 



16 



Neil W. Gerdes (M/L and CTS) Librarian and 
Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., Harvard 
University; M.A., Columbia University; 
M.A.L.S., University of Chicago. 

Norma S. Goertzen (NPTS) Director of Mellander 
Library, Assistant Professor of Theological 
Bibliography 

B.S., Goshen College; M.Div., Associate Men- 
nonite Biblical Seminaries; M.A., University of 
Notre Dame; M.Ln., Emory University. 



Marlys Rudeen (NPTS) Head of Technical 
Services 

B.A., North Park College; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; M.Div., North Park Theological 
Seminary; Study at St. Andrews University, 
Edinburgh, Scotland. 

Kenneth M. Shaffer (BTS/NBTS) Director, 
The Seminary Library, BTS/NBTS 
A.B., Bridgewater College; M.Div., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; M.A.L.S., Northern Il- 
linois University. 



Elvire Hilgert OKM) Public Service Librarian, 
Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., Pacific Union College;" M.S. in L.S., 
Catholic University of America; Study, 
Adventist Theological Seminary; University of 
the Philippines, Manila; University of Basel. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Director of 
Library 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Illinois; Study, University of 
Detroit; Loyola University, Chicago; Saint 
Louis University, Spalding College. 

Brewster Porcella (TEDS) Librarian 

A.B., A.M., Wheaton College; B.D., Faith 
Theological Seminary; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Illinois. 

Gertrude Priester (JKM) Ecumenical Parish 
Resource Center Supervisor, Jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library 

B.S., Grove City College; Graduate Study, 
Case Western Reserve University. 

Emilie G. Pulver QKM) Principal Cataloging 
Librarian, Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., Case Western Reserve University, M.L.S., 
University of Chicago. 



Gloria Sieben (SML) Librarian 
J.L.S., Rosary College. 

Newland F. Smith, 3rd (S-WTS) Librarian 
for Collection Development, The United Library, 
G-ETS/S-WTS, and Associate Professor of 
Bibliography 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.A., Graduate 
Library School, University of Chicago; B.D., 
Garrett Theological Seminary. 

Gwendolyn R. Vandon (BTS/NBTS) Circulation 
and Serials Librarian, The Seminary Library, 
BTS/NBTS 
L.T.A., College of DuPage. 

Donald W. Vorp (JKM) Director, jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library 

B.A., Roberts Wesleyan College; B.D., Asbury 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. cand., Drew 
University. 

William M. Yount (TEDS) Reference Librarian 
B.A., Asbury College; M.A., M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; Th.M., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; M.L.S., University of 
Southern Mississippi. 



117 



LOCATIONS OF ACTS SCHOOLS 

Legend: 

BTS Bethany Theological Seminary 

CTU Catholic Theological Union 

CTS Chicago Theological Seminary 

G-ETS Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary 

LSTC Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

MTS McCormick Theological Seminary 

M/L Meadville Lombard Theological School 

NPTS North Park Theological Seminary 

NBTS Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 

SML St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 

S'WTS Seabury-Western Theological Seminary 

TEDS Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS TO GET TO EACH AREA OF THE MAP: 

1. To SML: SML is located in Mundelein, forty miles northwest of downtown Chicago, 
and may be reached by car via the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the Route 176 exit, 
176 west to Mundelein. SML is located on the north side of 176. 

2. To TEDS: TEDS is located in the northwest suburb of Deerfield and may be reached 
by car via the Tri-State Tollway (1-94) north to the Route 22 exit. TEDS is immediately 
to the east of the expressway off Route 22. 

3. To G-ETS and S-WTS: G-ETS and S-WTS are located respectively on the east and 
west sides of Sheridan Road on the Northwestern University campus in Evanston. They 
may be reached either by car via the Lake Shore Drive (North) to Sheridan Road or by 
public transportation with the CTA elevated train to the Noyes Street station. 

4. To NPTS: NPTS is located on the far north side of Chicago and may be reached by 
car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from the Lake Shore Drive 
(North) or the Kennedy Expressway (1-90/94), and by public transporation with CTA 
elevated Howard train to the Berwyn Street station and connecting bus or the 
Ravenswood line to Kimball Street station. 

5. To BTS and NBTS: BTS and NBTS are located on adjacent campuses in west- 
suburban Oak Brook and Lombard, and may be reached by car via the East- West 
Tollway (1-5), Highland Avenue north to Butterfield Road (Route 56), Butterfield Road 
east. NBTS is north of Butterfield Road just west of BTS, which is located in the north- 
west corner of the intersection of Butterfield and Myers Roads. 

6. To CTU, CTS, LSTC, M/L and MTS: All five schools are located in close proximity 
of the Hyde Park area of Chicago near The University of Chicago. They may be reached 
by car via the Chicago metropolitan expressway system either from the Lake Shore 
Drive (South) or the Dan Ryan Expressway (1-90/94), and by public transportation 
either with the CTA elevated train or IC (Illinois Central) to the respective 55th Street 
stations and connecting buses. 



120 



l—i 1 — ♦— l 

12 3 4 MILES